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View Poll Results: Is this a representation of the "True America"
Yes 12 22.64%
No 41 77.36%
Voters: 53. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 08-06-2011, 10:12 AM
 
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Is the following video a representation of the "True America"?

http://youtu.be/MaAF_3WMJGM

Last edited by Bo; 08-08-2011 at 01:01 PM.. Reason: Thread moved from General US.
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Old 08-06-2011, 10:15 AM
 
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‪Toby Keith - Made In America‬‏ - YouTube
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Old 08-06-2011, 10:39 AM
 
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I would have agreed with you 20 years ago. Not anymore. The True America is no longer White, Protestant, and small town. I think that the lifestyles conveyed in the video are likely a thing of the past. Sure, some people my age still subscribe to it, but they are in the vast minority.
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Old 08-06-2011, 10:43 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nowincal11 View Post
I would have agreed with you 20 years ago. Not anymore. The True America is no longer White, Protestant, and small town. I think that the lifestyles conveyed in the video are likely a thing of the past. Sure, some people my age still subscribe to it, but they are in the vast minority.
However, aren't you in California? I know for a fact that California and the image of America, all coming from a California perspective, such as on the Disney Channel and the like, is also not indicative of most of the United States. For example, most of America is not 35% white, 35% mixed race, 20% black, and 10% Asian. In fact, California is really the only place that seems to display such an atmosphere to the extreme.

I'm not saying that most of the U.S. is small town. That said, I'm more or less talking about the mindset found in the video, you know, patriotism, love of God, love of country, love of family, and the things that go along with it.

By the way, most people in 1991 live in metro areas, just as they do today. You have to go back to around the 1950s, or sooner, I think, where the rural-urban balance tipped the 50% line. Saying "twenty years" makes me wonder if you're young.
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Old 08-06-2011, 10:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
However, aren't you in California? I know for a fact that California and the image of America, all coming from a California perspective, such as on the Disney Channel and the like, is also not indicative of most of the United States. For example, most of America is not 35% white, 35% mixed race, 20% black, and 10% Asian. In fact, California is really the only place that seems to display such an atmosphere to the extreme.

I'm not saying that most of the U.S. is small town. That said, I'm more or less talking about the mindset found in the video, you know, patriotism, love of God, love of country, love of family, and the things that go along with it.
California is certainly an outlier on diversity, but so is Alabama on the other side. I don't just use race. I use ethnicity too since "white" is too broad a term. Alabama whites really are English and Scotch-Irish.

California is more indicative of the new America demographically than Alabama or Arkansas. America is diversifying, every state, every city. In 25 years, there will be more who look like California than Alabama circa 1980.

The terms you use are very broad. Patriotism. I've yet to meet someone who wasn't happy they live in the US. Perhaps it isn't as widely displayed in Los Angeles or Boston as in rural Georgia, but it's there.

Religion. The Deep South has us all beat in that. The country has definitely become less enthused with the idea of a fusion between church and state except in more rural areas.

Love of family? Not really sure what that means. People my age tend to be moving across the country wherever there are ample jobs. That tends to be away from family. Now someone from a small town might be more apt to remain there.
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Old 08-06-2011, 11:03 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nowincal11 View Post
California is certainly an outlier on diversity, but so is Alabama on the other side. I don't just use race. I use ethnicity too since "white" is too broad a term. Alabama whites really are English and Scotch-Irish.
Alabama is less white than most of the states in America. I don't get your point. California is by far an outlier. It's not even within the realm of most states or areas, outside of parts of Texas, New York, the DC area, or south Florida.

Quote:
California is more indicative of the new America demographically than Alabama or Arkansas. America is diversifying, every state, every city. In 25 years, there will be more who look like California than Alabama circa 1980.
Alabama and Arkansas are far more black than the typical America. Both of these states are less white than most non-southern states, so I don't know why you chose southern states.

This video was filmed in Wisconsin, a midwestern state. It isn't the south. Why do you use 1980, when you can find such a scene in rural areas all over a large chunk of the United States?

In 25 years, places will likely be more diverse, but somewhat less than you're making. Most rural areas will still be fairly similar. Many of your suburban areas will see most of the change.

Quote:
The terms you use are very broad. Patriotism. I've yet to meet someone who wasn't happy they live in the US. Perhaps it isn't as widely displayed in Los Angeles or Boston as in rural Georgia, but it's there.
Certain regions display cultural marxist beliefs and ideas that have become entwined with their politician's political views and votes. These are at odds with America, both historically and politically. Thus, yes, some areas of the country, whose residents continue to vote cultural marxists into office, are less patriotic than others.

Even in suburban areas throughout the south and midwest, people are very patriotic. It isn't only a rural trait, though it seems to be universal for rural areas amongst all regions.

Quote:
Religion. The Deep South has us all beat in that. The country has definitely become less enthused with the idea of a fusion between church and state except in more rural areas.
The South as a whole is more religious, but so are rural areas all over the U.S. Furthermore, there is no separation of church and state in the constitution. Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion refers to no state church, or paying taxes to a state church. This is clearly seen in documents of early founders, not to mention the fact that congress opened with prayers, and many quoted God, even Jesus, on various occasions.

Quote:
Love of family? Not really sure what that means. People my age tend to be moving across the country wherever there are ample jobs. That tends to be away from family. Now someone from a small town might be more apt to remain there.
I mentioned nothing of moving away from family. I'm talking about showing love for family, honoring and respecting them, of which this song, showing scenes from a midwestern family and town, does.
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Old 08-06-2011, 11:11 AM
 
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The metros of NYC, LA, Chicago, DC, Philly, Boston, SF, Houston, Dallas, and Miami/Dade make up over 1/3 of the national US population. Add in smaller metros which are either already diverse (Cleveland, Detroit, STL) and metros that are diversifying (Charlotte, Austin, Phoenix), you get the picture. More of America looks like this than rural America which is simply either white or black.

The South and rural areas are more religious. I'll agree with that. There is a Separation of Church and State. You said it yourself. NO STATE CHURCH. Can't be any clearer than that. Regardless, that isn't the issue you presented. You asked about religiosity. In the public sphere, it's on the decline except in those areas. This is probably why no GOP candidate other than Romney can beat Obama all other things being equal (btw I don't like any of the candidates on either side).

So what do you mean "showing love for family." That is a really odd statement. Rural people are not the only ones who have family reunions, family get togethers, and take care of each other. That's been the Modus Operandi in ethnic neighborhoods throughout every major city since our people stepped off the boat.
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Old 08-06-2011, 11:28 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nowincal11 View Post
The metros of NYC, LA, Chicago, DC, Philly, Boston, SF, Houston, Dallas, and Miami/Dade make up over 1/3 of the national US population. Add in smaller metros which are either already diverse (Cleveland, Detroit, STL) and metros that are diversifying (Charlotte, Austin, Phoenix), you get the picture. More of America looks like this than rural America which is simply either white or black.
It's a tragedy that many of the major metros are like this. The landscape, however, if we're talking about square mileage of settle land, whether rural, urban, or suburban, isn't like your picture of America.

Quote:
The South and rural areas are more religious.
As should all areas be.

Quote:
There is a Separation of Church and State. You said it yourself. NO STATE CHURCH. Can't be any clearer than that. Regardless, that isn't the issue you presented. You asked about religiosity. In the public sphere, it's on the decline except in those areas. This is probably why no GOP candidate other than Romney can beat Obama all other things being equal (btw I don't like any of the candidates on either side).
So you're arguing that speaking about God in the political sphere doesn't constitute a violation of the mythological "separation of church and state". Or, are you saying, like I am, that having no state church is the only separation, meaning that any individual, politician or not, can speak in religious terms? After all, the constitution explicitly states, "or prohibiting the free exercise thereof".

Quote:
So what do you mean "showing love for family." That is a really odd statement. Rural people are not the only ones who have family reunions, family get togethers, and take care of each other. That's been the Modus Operandi in ethnic neighborhoods throughout every major city since our people stepped off the boat.
I didn't intend it to be taken that love for family was exclusive to only one area, only that it is a major part of what many view as the "true America".
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Old 08-06-2011, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Fishers, IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
Certain regions display cultural marxist beliefs and ideas that have become entwined with their politician's political views and votes. These are at odds with America, both historically and politically. Thus, yes, some areas of the country, whose residents continue to vote cultural marxists into office, are less patriotic than others.
I'm not exactly sure what "cultural marxism" is, but that's the thing about the U.S. -- you have a right to be one if you so wish. Being a non-conformist is very American, even if that means you're on the fringe. I don't see how that exactly equates to being less patriotic.

As for "love of family," there's a lot of bluster about it in this country, but less evidence to support its existence. For example, we divorce and re-marry like nobody else.
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Old 08-06-2011, 12:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
It's a tragedy that many of the major metros are like this. The landscape, however, if we're talking about square mileage of settle land, whether rural, urban, or suburban, isn't like your picture of America.



As should all areas be.



So you're arguing that speaking about God in the political sphere doesn't constitute a violation of the mythological "separation of church and state". Or, are you saying, like I am, that having no state church is the only separation, meaning that any individual, politician or not, can speak in religious terms? After all, the constitution explicitly states, "or prohibiting the free exercise thereof".



I didn't intend it to be taken that love for family was exclusive to only one area, only that it is a major part of what many view as the "true America".
So what is your view of the new America? Predominantly white and segregated?

As to your second point, why are you allowed to force religion on people who choose not to be religious? Isn't that a personal right for them? We don't live in Saudi Arabia.

Separation of church and state means only the government cannot inhibit nor advance the exercise of religion nor establish a state religion. If a politician wants to speak in religious terms, go ahead.

I'm pretty sure love of family transcends national boundaries.
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