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Old 10-13-2011, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Southcentral Kansas
44,924 posts, read 28,064,899 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TurtleCreek80 View Post
Like it or not, Congress are federal employees, just like post office workers, the military, and your local social security office workers.

Are we going to selectively decide which federal employees are eligible for federal healthcare plan coverage and which are sol? Should we hold a special election for that? Should it be the proposed 29th Ammendement, "Citizens will vote on all federal pay and benefits for all federal workers?"
Why not just repeal the law that made all this available to them and start over again?
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Old 10-13-2011, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Southcentral Kansas
44,924 posts, read 28,064,899 times
Reputation: 4269
Quote:
Originally Posted by TurtleCreek80 View Post
They are all a bit different, but they're all very rich in terms of payback @ retirement. All are qualified for federal employee pensions. The average American isn't working with pension benefits in 2011, so any federal employee has a "leg up" there, whether they're military, your senator, or your letter carrier!

Military Retirment Pension:
20 years of active service = 50% of final salary for life with 2.5% COL adjustment annually. This can be collected as early as age 37, leaving the serviceman/woman another 30 years to work as a civilian.

40 years active service = 100% of final salary for life with 2.5% COL adjustment annually.

Congress Retirment Pension:
20 years of service = 34-42% (depends on what date they started as the rates are lower now) of avg of last 3 years salary. MUST be age 50 or greater to collect.

30 years of service = 44-71% of avg of last 3 years salary. MUST be age 55 or greater to collect.

10 years of service, but age 60 or greater = 15-25% of avg of last 3 years salary

5 years of service, but age 62 or greater = 8.5-12.5% of avg of last 3 years salary.

Congress also pays 7% of their salaries into their pension/retirement fund.

Average Congressional retirement payout = $35,000 per year or about 19% of their annual salary.

Postal Service
Paid 1% of avg 3 high years pay x years of service. So let's say a postal worker's 3 highest years average $60,000 (Avg postal worker makes $52k so at retirment you'd be a bit over average). He works for 30 years and retires "on time" @ 62. His monthly benefit for life is $18,000 (30% of his high years and 35% of average years). If he works past 62 and takes "late retirment", his monthly benefit is 1.1% avg 3 high years x years of service. At age 64, he'd be getting $21,120 (35% of his high years and 41% of average).

They pay in 7% each year towards their pension, same as congress. Average contribution for average salary is $3.6k per year towards an $18-21k payout with 30+ years service--> $108k avg pay in towards $300-400k retirement payout for a 15-20 year retirement. Live into your 90's and payout could top $600k - a 6X payback is pretty good!

All of these federal workers in each case also pay into & collect Social Security benefits.
I need a link about Congressional salary and retirement. I know that they are paid $175,000 per annum and after one term in office (2yrs) for HOuse they collect the same $175,000 for life. Maybe if you look at your source it might be pretty old.
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Old 10-15-2011, 08:33 PM
 
1 posts, read 291 times
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Originally Posted by roysoldboy View Post
I have all kinds of friends and relatives who keep asking me about that and always give the same answer I will give you. There are two ways to propost an amendment, by Congress or by a Constitutional Convention. The last time a constitutional convention was called the members agreed at the very start to write a whole new document and the Constitution we have now was the result. What would happen if we got a convention with even a slight majority of progressives and they decided to propose a whole new document? I really am afraid of that happening for what may result.

Congress is never going to propose such an amendment so we are left with the Convention. BTW, the Congress has to call the Convention so it won't likely ever happen.
Article V Convention

Whenever you're talking about law, especially constitutional law, accuracy must come to the forefront. Article V, a one-sentence constitutional law, read simply without construction (adding to, enhancing), does not mention a "Constitutional" convention, but merely a convention -- so it is an Article V Convention (proper noun), not a constitutional convention.

Moreover, in order for "We The People" to PROPOSE making sweeping changes to the U.S. Constitution, 34 of the several states or 66.7% would have to agree to that goal in their applications (virtually impossible!). The Article V Convention or proposal phase comes to an end. Congress forwards the PROPOSED amendment to all 50 states to be RATIFIED (approved) by 38 state legislatures or 75% majority. IF it appeared to be moving toward approval, Congress would get real tricky to avoid that succeeding -- perhaps by adding "states" to the 50 current states to circumvent the 75% majority, or some other means.

Meanwhile, while we're waiting, consider this: Definition of 28th Amendment via Article V Convention June 7, 2011
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