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Old 01-25-2012, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Jewel Lake (Sagle) Idaho
27,487 posts, read 17,618,687 times
Reputation: 15585

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Most people will agree that the cost of a college education is excessive, making education inaccessible for some and plunging others deeply in debt. It occurs to me that the federal government dictates what may be charged for other services when it’s the federal taxpayer on the hook for payment. For example, Medicare reimbursement rates are dictated by the feds, not by the health care provider, regardless of the actual cost of those services.

Obama made a statement regarding education to the effect that colleges and universities must do their part. That those schools that keep raising tuition will see less from the government, or words to that effect. It got me thinking about this issue. It actually makes sense when taxpayers are paying (or guaranteeing) grants and student loans. There is plenty of precedent, Medicare reimbursement as mentioned being one, caps on hourly rates that businesses may charge for specific services are another.

My suggestion is that the federal government set a cap that schools may charge for tuition if they receive federal funds. Let’s say $6,000 per year for tuition (or in the case of state schools, tuition minus local/state taxpayer support). That certainly should provide funding for undergraduate programs. This will help limit the amount of debt a student can rack up, encourage schools to manage responsibly and offer a reasonable value.

Private institutions, supported with no federal funds, are a different story. But if you’re receiving the taxpayer’s dime, it’s fair that you be held to a level of accountability.


What say you?
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Old 01-25-2012, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
8,803 posts, read 7,577,630 times
Reputation: 4501
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toyman at Jewel Lake View Post
[SIZE=3]Most people will agree that the cost of a college education is excessive, making education inaccessible for some and plunging others deeply in debt. It occurs to me that the federal government dictates what may be charged for other services when itís the federal taxpayer on the hook for payment. For example, Medicare reimbursement rates are dictated by the feds, not by the health care provider, regardless of the actual cost of those services.[/SIZE]
[SIZE=3]Obama made a statement regarding education to the effect that colleges and universities must do their part. That those schools that keep raising tuition will see less from the government, or words to that effect. It got me thinking about this issue. It actually makes sense when taxpayers are paying (or guaranteeing) grants and student loans. There is plenty of precedent, Medicare reimbursement as mentioned being one, caps on hourly rates that businesses may charge for specific services are another.[/SIZE]
[SIZE=3]My suggestion is that the federal government set a cap that schools may charge for tuition if they receive federal funds. Letís say $6,000 per year for tuition (or in the case of state schools, tuition minus local/state taxpayer support). That certainly should provide funding for undergraduate programs.[/SIZE]
[SIZE=3]This will help limit the amount of debt a student can rack up, encourage schools to manage responsibly and offer a reasonable value.[/SIZE]
[SIZE=3]Private institutions, supported with no federal funds, are a different story. But if youíre receiving the taxpayerís dime, itís fair that you be held to a level of accountability.[/SIZE]
[SIZE=3]What say you?[/SIZE]
I say that's a bad idea because runaway costs are caused by the government. If you cap tuition, it will create a shortage of opportunities.
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Old 01-25-2012, 08:07 PM
 
20,976 posts, read 16,256,431 times
Reputation: 10270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toyman at Jewel Lake View Post
Most people will agree that the cost of a college education is excessive, making education inaccessible for some and plunging others deeply in debt. It occurs to me that the federal government dictates what may be charged for other services when itís the federal taxpayer on the hook for payment. For example, Medicare reimbursement rates are dictated by the feds, not by the health care provider, regardless of the actual cost of those services.

Obama made a statement regarding education to the effect that colleges and universities must do their part. That those schools that keep raising tuition will see less from the government, or words to that effect. It got me thinking about this issue. It actually makes sense when taxpayers are paying (or guaranteeing) grants and student loans. There is plenty of precedent, Medicare reimbursement as mentioned being one, caps on hourly rates that businesses may charge for specific services are another.

My suggestion is that the federal government set a cap that schools may charge for tuition if they receive federal funds. Letís say $6,000 per year for tuition (or in the case of state schools, tuition minus local/state taxpayer support). That certainly should provide funding for undergraduate programs. This will help limit the amount of debt a student can rack up, encourage schools to manage responsibly and offer a reasonable value.

Private institutions, supported with no federal funds, are a different story. But if youíre receiving the taxpayerís dime, itís fair that you be held to a level of accountability.


What say you?
The federal government is the reason that we're in this position.

The federal government never had and still doesn't have the authority to be involved.
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Old 01-25-2012, 08:09 PM
 
17,722 posts, read 19,785,288 times
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There is no such thing as "inaccessible" tuition... there are plenty of community colleges, technical schools, public universities, vocational schools, etc etc that have cheap tuition for the poorest of people... the reason it is so expensive is because there are too many people wanting to go to a specific "brand-name" university and majoring in "how to waste your money" degrees with an oversaturated job market... you don't have to look at schools to see this, the same can be said of large cities, hence higher costs of houses in these areas (and salaries)... I am not saying that capping tuition is a bad idea but I think only people who looked into the issue, anticipate future changes, and have more than a single idea to fix the issue should be the ones making those decisions... and who are these people... 1) not the government 2) not part of the education system or its unions 3) not stupid...
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Old 01-25-2012, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Jewel Lake (Sagle) Idaho
27,487 posts, read 17,618,687 times
Reputation: 15585
Quote:
Originally Posted by alphamale View Post
The federal government is the reason that we're in this position.

The federal government never had and still doesn't have the authority to be involved.

I don't disagree. However, the federal government has insisted on inserting themselves into the higher education industry. Between grants to schools, grants and aid to individual students and federally backed student loans, the feds have gotten the taxpayer deeply involved in this industry. They should be able to insist on how much a provider charges for their service. It's no different than shopping for any other service. Don't like it? Don't expect the taxpayer to support you.

If the government can dictate what health care providers that accept taxpayer funds can charge for their services, why not education providers?
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Old 01-25-2012, 08:14 PM
 
Location: mancos
7,176 posts, read 6,465,871 times
Reputation: 4946
tuition is only part of the problem.I know several professional students who live quite well and have never worked but just borrow for school plus living expenses every year.If they ever stop going to school the loans come due, so they just keep going to school hoping someday the gov will forgive the debt. OWC now!! one is 29 one is 37. so sad what loosers the game must end.
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Old 01-25-2012, 08:15 PM
 
27,903 posts, read 34,428,496 times
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The Federal Government shouldn't do a GD thing.

The Feds thinking they can control and guide the economy is what's wrong with this nation.
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Old 01-25-2012, 08:15 PM
 
50,508 posts, read 26,677,010 times
Reputation: 15775
College education shouldn't be for the elite, nor should it be something that forces kids to have to take out tens of thousands in loans.

I just finished dropping 60k on 4 years of school for my son, and now that he's in his Masters program as of this month, i've gotta come out of another 11 grand this year (thank God he'll be done in a year). I'm a working stiff and so if my wife. We aren't wealthy people. This is doable for one kid (for us), but if i had two kids, no way would i be able to do it.

The tuition wasn't even the worst of it....the fees, books, meal plan, and dorm room were crippling all by themselves.

All i'm saying is that if college is for the elite, then let's just say so. But let's stop pretending that it's easily within reach for everyone.
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Old 01-25-2012, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Jewel Lake (Sagle) Idaho
27,487 posts, read 17,618,687 times
Reputation: 15585
Quote:
Originally Posted by parfleche View Post
tuition is only part of the problem.I know several professional students who live quite well and have never worked but just borrow for school plus living expenses every year.If they ever stop going to school the loans come due, so they just keep going to school hoping someday the gov will forgive the debt. OWC now!! one is 29 one is 37. so sad what loosers the game must end.
Fair enough, good point. Their absolutely should be a cap on how many credit hours are supported on the backs of the taxpayer. A typical undergrad degree is what, 140 credit hours (was 180 where I went to school). Lets cap support at that level. After 140 credits, no more loans or grants, and tuition at public schools, supported by the taxpayer, reverts to "out of state" rates.

Masters and PHd programs need to be looked at differently. Med school or particle physics have more demands for facilities than say English majors.
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Old 01-25-2012, 08:37 PM
 
Location: CHicago, United States
6,936 posts, read 7,256,578 times
Reputation: 3490
Supply and demand determine prices. If the costs are too high parents should send the kids to community and less expensive schools. The high-priced schools will either then compete, or cease to exist. Prices will drop. Maybe the schoosl get smaller, leaner. That'll be okay.
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