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Old 03-10-2012, 12:31 PM
 
Location: One of the 13 original colonies.
10,162 posts, read 6,491,939 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LuckyGem View Post
Who said it was allright to make fun of anybody because of their ethnicity in America?


Exactly! Only the ignorant make fun of others.
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Old 03-10-2012, 12:47 PM
 
50,642 posts, read 26,718,760 times
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I'm quite partial to racial jokes myself. Love 'em. Especially the ones about black folks. My only requirement is that they be funny. Please don't tell me one that's gonna fall flat. That's a problem.

Don't know why Indians/Asians should be exempt.
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Old 03-10-2012, 12:50 PM
 
3,337 posts, read 2,571,029 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fanman72 View Post
No one will bat an eye if someone makes another corny 7-11 or taxi-cab joke, but god forbid you say anything even remotely offensive to blacks and you'll be dragged through the mud by society. Even further exacerbating the ridiculousness is that it's very likely the indian/asian has done well for themself in america, all without the help of "white privilege" and the "good ol boy's network"


Double standards, anyone?



Note - this is NOT meant to attack blacks. This message is intended to ask why it's acceptable for anyone of any race - white, black, hispanic in America etc to casually make a curry joke without any reprecussions?
Because it was once a free country and you can say what you want, when you want?
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Old 03-10-2012, 03:09 PM
 
50,642 posts, read 26,718,760 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by modeerf View Post
Because it was once a free country and you can say what you want, when you want?
True. But there are complications with that. There are also repercussions.
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Old 03-10-2012, 04:55 PM
 
3,337 posts, read 2,571,029 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desertdetroiter View Post
True. But there are complications with that. There are also repercussions.
Absolutely, it's a complicated world.

We will all be judged by every thought and act.
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Old 03-14-2012, 08:25 AM
 
985 posts, read 3,262,613 times
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Cool big america

Quote:
Quote:
In contrast to common media stereotypes of black people as uneducated, violent and angry at white people, news and entertainment media often portray Asians as “model minorities” who aren’t prone to kick up a fuss about discriminatory treatment. When we are confronted with racist remarks or incidents, Asians, with our supposedly introverted tendencies, are expected to “take it.”

“It might be true that Asian-Americans, who have historically suffered from explicit discriminatory policies, may have learned to ‘take it,’ but ‘taking it’ is a cultural reaction for survival in a place where we were (and still are!) welcome to work but not to live or identify with,” Isaac Louie, a diversity committee board member at Simon Fraser University, told WIMN’s Voices.
I guess Asians "taking it" is their way of surviving.
Also, considering their relatively low number percentagewise, the most effective way for them to survive is through kind of a silent revolution, using their brain and skills whilst swallowing attacks of humiliation in a country that has defined itself as the antithet of the East and in a society that takes pride in being big, strong, aggressive and praises outspokenness.

It is quite interesting how America values bigness in so many things, like:
big country,
big cars,
big b00bs,
big 4$$,
big money,
big buildings,
big mouth [with silence, associated with Asians, being perceived as weakness.]
men are extoled for being big, tall, taking pride in having big balls and big dix, and being the antithet of the East, relegating Asian men to the opposite of "big".
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Old 03-14-2012, 10:29 AM
 
15,449 posts, read 7,883,440 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neutre View Post
Jeremy Lin reinforces the stereotypes associated with Asian men, like for example being silent even when you're obviously being treated with injustice [thus seen as weak & effeminate by the general American psyche], and at the same time he shows that it doesn't have to make you less American.
He's broadened what a lot of Americans think of what it means to be an American man. Cause if we're being honest, the traits of being Asian [male] and being American have been seen as contradictive in a lot of people's minds.

Personally, I feel that the bolded area is right on. An abundance of people don't listen to the few protests of Asians and Asian Indians due to this bolded section. This segment of the population is considered weak and silent and so people say whatever they want about them thinking that they will just sit around and take it. They do not "fear" them so to speak. Ironically, black people sat silent for a long time as well, as did Jews and Hispanics in this country until these groups got sick of being ill treated and started being louder.

I actually do see this happening more often with Asians in particular. There are some Asian groups, especially on the west coast who are vocal about stereotypes of Asians. Even here in Atlanta, which is now considered an "Asian Mecca" (large amounts of Koreans in particular are moving here) there was a forray of sorts a few years ago with our public transit system naming the section of the train system that goes to where the majority of the Asian population live, the "Yellow Line." The Asian population was very vocal about that and it was renamed the "Gold Line."

I actually also know of some Asians who do not like the "smart, quiet, meek" Asian stereotypes and there are Asian writers who speak out against these stereotypes as well even though many who are not Asian see them as "positives" of Asians.


Quote:
Originally Posted by desertdetroiter View Post
I'm quite partial to racial jokes myself. Love 'em. Especially the ones about black folks. My only requirement is that they be funny. Please don't tell me one that's gonna fall flat. That's a problem.

Don't know why Indians/Asians should be exempt.
I am black and agree with the above. I love black racial jokes but they HAVE to be funny. If they aren't funny then that is the issue, like Kramer with his N word rant...not funny, but other white comedians know how to make fun of black people in a funny way. Ralphie May and Gary Owen come to mind.
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