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Old 04-05-2012, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, Louisiana
14,095 posts, read 23,696,719 times
Reputation: 7984

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I've seen some very slim and healthy nurses start working at the hospital. Several years of working their hard schedule and eating what they can while on the job, many of them have gotten fat. Very few are able to keep slim. They can bring only so much food from home. Once that food's gone, all that's left is the vending machine, cafeteria, or restaurant food. You ever tried bringing enough food from home for three whole days on the job? All floor staff share one single refrigerator. They do try to find healthy restaurant food to eat but even the healthiest restaurant food isn't very healthy. High stress causes the body to increase cortisol production which increases body fat storage around the midsection. Working such long hours in which people's lives depend on you raises your stress levels and that's not including the verbal and physical abuse they must endure from problem patients. Sometimes they must deal with elderly patients with dementia who begin finger painting or having a mud fight with their own poop. Some patients become violent. We had one nurse beaten up by a patient before we could get there to hold him down for the police and hospital security. On nights and weekends, there's only one person in my job covering the entire hospital for general maintenance, boiler room, HVAC, elevators, emergency generators, medical gas system, and fire alarm monitoring (we're the first responders for non-medical emergencies). We must make decisions that impact patient comfort and safety without management input or approval. We don't just cover the main hospital. We also cover several other buildings owned by the hospital.
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Old 04-05-2012, 05:19 PM
 
18,852 posts, read 31,737,753 times
Reputation: 26119
Consider the irony of an obese diabetic nurse educator providing information on weight management and type 2 diabetes. If you can't do it, don't teach it.

While there are many generalizations and stereo types about obese people, it is true that obesity is dirctly linked to many costly health issues, including diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, and depression. In addition, a large staff person puts more weight on items of every use, like chairs, and leads to replacement of equipment more frequently. Obese people are slower, and less fit than thinner counterparts. In a safety drill, or even emergency when patients need to be evacuated, do you want an obese nurse getting you to safety, or a thiiner, faster nurse helping you?

I see the fat coming closer and closer to being a "protected" class. That will be interesting.
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Old 04-05-2012, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, Louisiana
14,095 posts, read 23,696,719 times
Reputation: 7984
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Health care professionals are not hired for their looks, or to attract patients with their looks.

I wonder if this extends to doctors? I've seen a fair number of them with pot bellies.
More likely not since most of the doctors you see at hospitals don't work for the hospital. Most have their own private practice. The more doctors with hospital access a hospital has, the more patients and surgeries a hospital can have. I've seen some extremely large doctors. One was so large she thought the operating room was way too hot. It was 62 degrees.
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Old 04-05-2012, 05:35 PM
 
6,659 posts, read 6,836,348 times
Reputation: 10048
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailordave View Post
I've seen some very slim and healthy nurses start working at the hospital. Several years of working their hard schedule and eating what they can while on the job, many of them have gotten fat. Very few are able to keep slim. They can bring only so much food from home. Once that food's gone, all that's left is the vending machine, cafeteria, or restaurant food. You ever tried bringing enough food from home for three whole days on the job? All floor staff share one single refrigerator. They do try to find healthy restaurant food to eat but even the healthiest restaurant food isn't very healthy. High stress causes the body to increase cortisol production which increases body fat storage around the midsection. Working such long hours in which people's lives depend on you raises your stress levels and that's not including the verbal and physical abuse they must endure from problem patients. Sometimes they must deal with elderly patients with dementia who begin finger painting or having a mud fight with their own poop. Some patients become violent. We had one nurse beaten up by a patient before we could get there to hold him down for the police and hospital security. On nights and weekends, there's only one person in my job covering the entire hospital for general maintenance, boiler room, HVAC, elevators, emergency generators, medical gas system, and fire alarm monitoring (we're the first responders for non-medical emergencies). We must make decisions that impact patient comfort and safety without management input or approval. We don't just cover the main hospital. We also cover several other buildings owned by the hospital.
This is true, and the stress of the job is rarely considered to be a factor by the administrators and others. My sister is a nurse, and worked for years with Alzheimer's patients. She seemed to thrive on the stress, but eventually had to leave nursing due to rheumatoid arthritis ... which is exacerbated by stress. Now she's disabled due to the disease. She never became obese, but she was not working the kind of shifts that would have limited her food choices.
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Old 04-05-2012, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Austin
2,173 posts, read 2,878,707 times
Reputation: 2186
Quote:
Originally Posted by tluv00 View Post
What if the person is disabled because they are fat and is fully qualified for the job?
They may be qualified, but will their body limit them in their job functions?
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Old 04-05-2012, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, Louisiana
14,095 posts, read 23,696,719 times
Reputation: 7984
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasper12 View Post
Consider the irony of an obese diabetic nurse educator providing information on weight management and type 2 diabetes. If you can't do it, don't teach it.

While there are many generalizations and stereo types about obese people, it is true that obesity is directly linked to many costly health issues, including diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, and depression. In addition, a large staff person puts more weight on items of every use, like chairs, and leads to replacement of equipment more frequently. Obese people are slower, and less fit than thinner counterparts. In a safety drill, or even emergency when patients need to be evacuated, do you want an obese nurse getting you to safety, or a thinner, faster nurse helping you?

I see the fat coming closer and closer to being a "protected" class. That will be interesting.
I personally know of some chain smoking respiratory therapist.
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Old 04-05-2012, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, Louisiana
14,095 posts, read 23,696,719 times
Reputation: 7984
Quote:
Originally Posted by redvelvet709 View Post
They may be qualified, but will their body limit them in their job functions?
A job specific fitness requirement would be more fair than a blanket policy based upon a BMI rating. Instead of making such a blanket policy, they could provide staff with the means to help them get in better physical shape (dieticians, test for diabetes, access to or discount to health club). They could also work with staff to make work hours to reduce stress to the body. Our hospital has it's own gym with discount memberships to hospital employees. However, it's not open 24/7 and some staff hours make it near impossible to go work out a minimum of 3 days a week.
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Old 04-05-2012, 05:44 PM
 
5,527 posts, read 8,971,559 times
Reputation: 1860
Quote:
Originally Posted by redvelvet709 View Post
They may be qualified, but will their body limit them in their job functions?
Depends on the job.
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Old 04-05-2012, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest
1,754 posts, read 1,590,334 times
Reputation: 3449
Quote:
Originally Posted by gallowsCalibrator View Post




Well color me teal.



Pass the crayons.

Look, your disdain for the overweight comes across loud and clear through your posts. Now you think they shouldn't have jobs as well as what they suffer on a daily basis. If you had expressed this same disdain for a minority you'd be busy the next 20 years picking pitchforks out of your ass.

Last edited by CaseyB; 04-06-2012 at 05:40 AM.. Reason: discuss the topic, not other members
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Old 04-05-2012, 05:59 PM
 
Location: SWFL
22,884 posts, read 19,320,177 times
Reputation: 21343
My goodness! I have never seen such out and out bigotry towards fat people as I have here!

I'm a "burger bunny" and am now overweight but I can run circles around the skinnier, more svelte co-workers. There are customers who come in and look down their nose at me because I am fat but my regular customers who have gotten to know me over the years love me for my nice personality. I have been a "stick figure" too and noticed the difference (in men) (and some women!) towards me when I gained weight....from Prednisone. Didn't take but 5 days after hubby died to have one of my regulars to "hit on me"! Thanks, I'm flattered but eeewww.

My Mom was an RN, she got heavy from her job too but damned, she was the bestest nurse I ever knew! She wasn't obese but heavy. I can't tell you how many times she worked day and night. I remember spending many a day and half the nigh in either the witing room ofr the OR theater waiting for Dad to get off work. (before I started school) If they needed someone, they would always call her first and she would dutifly go.

I have to admit I see lots of people who make me feel still skinny! I feel sorry for them. Being fat is difficult for me now. I can't bend like I used to. I was horrified at myself at Disney World! So give the fat people a break. They feel bad enough as it is.
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