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Old 11-30-2012, 08:25 AM
 
33,046 posts, read 21,944,895 times
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(You think YOUR property taxes are too high?)

In fiscal year 2010, state and local governments collected $441.6 billion in property taxes, comprising 23.5 percent of state and local own-source revenue. Because the tax is so unpopular with homeowners, many people have pushed to shift more of the tax burden on commercial and industrial properties, says Joseph Henchman of the Tax Foundation.

Commercial properties face higher tax rates than residential properties in 39 states

Overall, commercial property paid 1.724 times what a homestead paid in 2010.

State and Local Property Taxes Target Commercial and Industrial Property
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Old 11-30-2012, 08:42 AM
 
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How 'bout Churches?

Jesus paid his taxes, and advised folks to do the same.
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Old 11-30-2012, 09:04 AM
 
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Some states show that they receive more tax revenue from residential properties. However, that data may be misleading since there may be more residential properties than commercial and industrial properties, like in New Jersey.
What kind of dumb ass study wouldn't adjust for the number of res vs. com vs. industrial properties ?
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Old 11-30-2012, 09:11 AM
 
691 posts, read 662,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
(You think YOUR property taxes are too high?)

In fiscal year 2010, state and local governments collected $441.6 billion in property taxes, comprising 23.5 percent of state and local own-source revenue. Because the tax is so unpopular with homeowners, many people have pushed to shift more of the tax burden on commercial and industrial properties, says Joseph Henchman of the Tax Foundation.

Commercial properties face higher tax rates than residential properties in 39 states

Overall, commercial property paid 1.724 times what a homestead paid in 2010.

State and Local Property Taxes Target Commercial and Industrial Property

And people wonder why there aren't more jobs close to home.
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Old 12-01-2012, 07:21 AM
 
33,046 posts, read 21,944,895 times
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Originally Posted by le roi View Post
What kind of dumb ass study wouldn't adjust for the number of res vs. com vs. industrial properties ?

Studies that are poorly designed or which have a political axe to grind, usually.

I'd like to see a tax comparison between owner-occupied and rental property, which we don't have here. Rental property can be residential (single-family homes and 2-4 unit properties) or commercial (apartment buildings greater than 4 units are usually classified as commercial)
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Old 12-01-2012, 07:43 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,510 posts, read 54,051,619 times
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Higher taxes on commercial/industrial makes sense to me. They are properties that are generating a profit for the owners, while residential is providing places for people to live.
When you consider the "services" provided by those taxes, commercial/industrial properties are costing the state/local government more than residential.
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Old 12-01-2012, 07:59 AM
 
33,046 posts, read 21,944,895 times
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Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Higher taxes on commercial/industrial makes sense to me. They are properties that are generating a profit for the owners, while residential is providing places for people to live.
When you consider the "services" provided by those taxes, commercial/industrial properties are costing the state/local government more than residential.

But apartment buildings provide places for people to live and usually (when greater than 4 units) are taxed at higher commercial rates.

Also, rental property (which can be residential (single family houses) or commercial (apartments)) is taxed at higher rates in many states.

The National Multi Housing Council (nmhc.org), a nationwide organization of apartment owners and managers, notes that single family homes generate more than 2x as many school kids per 100 units than apartments.

And since K12 education is usually the largest local tax consumer, it's incorrect to say that commercial/industrial properties cost governments more than residential.
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