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Old 10-16-2007, 11:24 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
44 posts, read 23,752 times
Reputation: 27

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Traditionally in most societies, it's considered the responsibility of the older generations to act as mentors for younger generations. However, in times of late, I'm not really certain that the U.S.'s older generations, particularly the WWII and Boomer generations, care at all about we younger folks.

When I was young, I was taught that anytime I use something that doesn't belong to me personally, I need to leave it in at least as good a condition as I found it. This notion applies to many things one encounters throughout their day, and throughout their life. However, I wonder where the older generations are in their concern to leave behind a society as good as the one they had? It seems older people these days are concerned with not much else other than their prescription drugs, Social Security, and senior's discount at Denny's or some other place.

What of the nation that's being left to me, or my peers? Is it really acceptable to dump all these troubles on my generation, such as multiculturalism, nihilism, and all the other social ills that leave the U.S., and Western Civilization in general, without a moral compass and cultural identity? Why do the older generations seem content to just leave our society alone and not speak out against the dramatic changes that are leading to our demise?
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Old 10-16-2007, 11:30 PM
 
1,572 posts, read 3,610,101 times
Reputation: 510
Mostly alot of older people just don't get it. My grandfather is a perfect example. He is on me and my cousin's case all the time because we are all around age 30-ish and still single with no plans to marry soon and busy either unemployed or underemployed, living at home. At that age he already had 5 children and a house.

I don't believe most of the seniors and older people realized how deeply screwed up the country is. Their generation had either the GI bill, or the prosperity of the 50's and 60's in their favor. My generation and the ones around it (Generation Y) have globalization, outsourcing, lots of immigration and crowding.... that the older generation ismply did not have.
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Old 10-16-2007, 11:45 PM
 
Location: Boise
4,425 posts, read 5,143,699 times
Reputation: 1695
you know, I believe that the WWII generation was america's greatest generation... and I think those of them that are alive, really do care. They wouldn't have put so much on the line like they did. Very honourable generation.. and nothing can be taken away from them. unfortunately there aren't many left to defend anything. I will say, that I think the Babyboomer generation is where your issues come from. Working with the public you can clearly see that. They are the product of "times of plenty" and in turn has caused the shift in our society to be all about #1. They were able to bask in a new dominant victorious America as a superpower..and wreap the rewards of their parents.In turn they have had children who are my generation, who lack good values, stable upbringings, responsibility, work ethics, sense of community, and the list goes on.. My generation has some serious issues to deal with when the steering wheel of power is passed on to us... of course there are exceptions to the rule.. and not everyone who is a member of any generation is guilty by default... but in a general "big picture"... that is how I see it. so.. if you are upset... and feel cheated... look to your parents...
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Old 10-17-2007, 12:00 AM
 
1,572 posts, read 3,610,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boiseguy View Post
.In turn they have had children who are my generation, who lack good values, stable upbringings, responsibility, work ethics, sense of community, and the list goes on.. My generation has some serious issues to deal with when the steering wheel of power is passed on to us....
I wouldn't say Generation X or Y has bad values, they are just a product of their times. I'd agree though, that more of us have had instability in our lives and a certain groundlessness and cynicism. You can blame that on the Baby Boomers, though, not the 20 and 30 somethings. Baby boomers reaped alot of the rewards of the policies, and they are dumping the costs on the younger generation. Globalization and outsourcing have produced cheaper goods and services for themselves, but after they had aquired a good career insulated from alot of the effects of their choices. In essence the Baby Boomers have sold off the birthright, as much as it is, to fund their own welfare and lifestyles. Buying things at Wal-Mart/China in the 80's and 90's was not value neutral. Heck, even letting these monstrosities develope in the first place was not value-neutral. People always had a choice, and they sided with instant profits over long-term economic stability.
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Old 10-17-2007, 12:11 AM
 
Location: Boise
4,425 posts, read 5,143,699 times
Reputation: 1695
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnulus View Post
I wouldn't say Generation X or Y has bad values, they are just a product of their times. I'd agree though, that more of us have had instability in our lives and a certain groundlessness and cynicism. You can blame that on the Baby Boomers, though, not the 20 and 30 somethings. Baby boomers reaped alot of the rewards of the policies, and they are dumping the costs on the younger generation. Globalization and outsourcing have produced cheaper goods and services for themselves, but after they had aquired a good career insulated from alot of the effects of their choices. In essence the Baby Boomers have sold off the birthright, as much as it is, to fund their own welfare and lifestyles. Buying things at Wal-Mart/China in the 80's and 90's was not value neutral. Heck, even letting these monstrosities develope in the first place was not value-neutral. People always had a choice, and they sided with instant profits over long-term economic stability.
selling off the birthright... good way of puting it... I couldn't agree more..
everyone that has recently graduated from college knows all too well how waiting for them to retire so you can get a decent job works... sadly I don't think those good paying jobs are going to be left for them... this was the generation that used american dominence and power to start non defensive wars....and they continue to do so... ask any WWII generation member what they think of this iraq war... and you'll get an earful.. I live in one of the most conservative states.. and every one I have had the opportunity to talk to about the war seems to share the same sentiments... funny how opinions differ when you ask the "majority" baby boomer generation though...
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Old 10-17-2007, 12:14 AM
 
5,767 posts, read 10,034,016 times
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I do think it's shameful how STUDENT DEBT is one of the only kinds of debt that can't be extinguished through bankruptcy - they'll just garnish your paycheck. For whatever reason, the older generations have rigged the system so that members of the younger generation have to plunge into debt to secure an education. This might be because the Boomers commoditized so many things - the idea of a 'public trust' is always put up against 'market realities.'
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Old 10-17-2007, 01:57 AM
 
Location: On a back country trail just toodling along...
38 posts, read 32,284 times
Reputation: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnulus View Post
Mostly alot of older people just don't get it. My grandfather is a perfect example. He is on me and my cousin's case all the time because we are all around age 30-ish and still single with no plans to marry soon and busy either unemployed or underemployed, living at home. At that age he already had 5 children and a house.

I don't believe most of the seniors and older people realized how deeply screwed up the country is. Their generation had either the GI bill, or the prosperity of the 50's and 60's in their favor. My generation and the ones around it (Generation Y) have globalization, outsourcing, lots of immigration and crowding.... that the older generation ismply did not have.
That's still no excuse to be living at home at 30!!! For crying out loud, get an education and get a job. I wouldn't let my kid live at home like that. He's 18 and I already told him it's off to college. If he drops out, it's his problem, he's not coming back to the nest. Time to kick the fledglings out on their own.

The younger generation is 'anti-work' and doesn't want to listen to the older generation. I am 39 years old, and I cannot imagine a 30 year old who is supposed to be a man, and a responsible ADULT, living at home. I guess potty training comes later these days.
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Old 10-17-2007, 02:27 AM
 
Location: Boise
4,425 posts, read 5,143,699 times
Reputation: 1695
Quote:
Originally Posted by Green Man View Post
That's still no excuse to be living at home at 30!!! For crying out loud, get an education and get a job. I wouldn't let my kid live at home like that. He's 18 and I already told him it's off to college. If he drops out, it's his problem, he's not coming back to the nest. Time to kick the fledglings out on their own.

The younger generation is 'anti-work' and doesn't want to listen to the older generation. I am 39 years old, and I cannot imagine a 30 year old who is supposed to be a man, and a responsible ADULT, living at home. I guess potty training comes later these days.
get real.. I know of 40 year olds that have gotten a divorce and ended up with nowhere to go but back to their parents house for a spell.. your touting of ideals are great.. but the reality of it is.. I have many friends who are in their mid 20's that went to college and cannot get a job to pay them more than 10 dollars per hour... given cost of transportation.. rents.. health costs.. food costs.. the percentages of wages to cost of living are NOT in the same favour it was when you were this age... and your jobs were not being outsourced to graduates in india for 1/10 of what you're able to do it for...
I'm lucky in that my profession I chose makes me a state employee.. but I'm not going to stand on any high horse and degrade anyone that is trying to make it in the "free market" and struggling... if you aren't upper middle class... and your kids are around 18... come talk to us when they're 26-30.. and tell us how things are going...
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Old 10-17-2007, 04:23 AM
 
Location: On a back country trail just toodling along...
38 posts, read 32,284 times
Reputation: 24
I would hardly call unemployed and living at home "Trying to make it", or "Struggling". I went from NOTHING at 18 to having a good deal at 39. It was ALL HARD WORK.
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Old 10-17-2007, 04:46 AM
 
2,775 posts, read 2,585,989 times
Reputation: 2967
All the bickering aside about living at home at age 30 (which does seem ridiculous but not unfathomable due to temporary unemployment issues or other personal things which happen all too often) the main question by the OP was whether the older generations cares about the younger ones. I think the obvious answer about the wwii generation was already mentioned - yes they care, and they care very much. They put their lives on the line for the future generations, and most I've known were so deeply affected by the war they have never forgotten why they did what they did. The following generations of folks including the boomers just seem to have been taken by surprise regarding all the things which have happened in the last 20 years. They had very high hopes for the economy and everything else regarding their own children but have been barely able to deal with the surprise of their own old age much less being able to help the younger generations. I theorize that they care but they just haven't figured out what to do and many of them simply don't have the time to do anything (unlike previous generations they won't be retiring at age 40 or even 50... but likely not retiring at all).
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