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Old 02-17-2013, 04:21 PM
 
Location: La lune et les étoiles
17,611 posts, read 18,999,465 times
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The first black-owned film company was The Lincoln Motion Picture Company, founded by the famous Missourian actor Noble Johnson in 1916



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Old 02-17-2013, 04:29 PM
 
Location: La lune et les étoiles
17,611 posts, read 18,999,465 times
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Oscar Devereaux Micheaux (January 2, 1884 – March 25, 1951) was an American author, film director and independent producer of more than 44 films. Although the short-lived Lincoln Motion Picture Company produced some films, he is regarded as the first major African-American feature filmmaker, the most successful African-American filmmaker of the first half of the twentieth century and the most prominent producer of race films. He produced both silent films and "talkies" after the industry changed to incorporate speaking actors.





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Old 02-17-2013, 04:34 PM
 
Location: La lune et les étoiles
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Clara Belle Williams (1885-1994) - First African American graduate of New Mexico State University



Clara Belle Drisdale was born in Plum, Texas in October 1885. She attended Prairie View Normal and Independent College (now Prairie View A & M University) in Prairie View, Texas beginning in 1903, and was valedictorian of her 1908 graduating class.

She married Jasper Williams in 1917, and had three sons: Jasper, James, and Charles. Mr. Williams died in 1946.

Williams took courses at the University of Chicago, and then enrolled at the New Mexico College of Agriculture & Mechanic Arts in the fall of 1928.

Mrs. Williams taught at the Booker T. Washington School in Las Cruces, New Mexico for more than 20 years, during a time when Las Cruces’s public schools were segregated. While teaching she was taking courses only offered during the summer and graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in English from NMCA&MA in 1937 at the age of 51.

Clara Belle Williams continued her education well beyond her graduation date, taking graduate level classes into the 1950s. Mrs. Williams provided a shining example of overcoming adversity and served as an inspiration to her family and the people she met throughout her life.
Mrs. Williams’ three sons all went to college and graduated with medical degrees. Charles attended Howard University Medical School in Washington D.C.; Jasper and James graduated from Creighton University Medical School in Omaha, Nebraska. They went on to found the Williams Clinic in Chicago, Illinois. Mrs. Williams always urged her sons to succeed in higher education – and they did just that.

Clara Belle Williams went on to receive many honors during her lifetime. She succeeded despite significant obstacles of discrimination placed before her while pursuing her higher education. In 1961, New Mexico State University named Williams Street on the main campus in her honor. She received an Honorary Doctorate of Laws degree from NMSU in 1980.

Mrs. Williams passed away July 3, 1994 at the age of 108.
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Old 02-20-2013, 03:55 AM
 
Location: Midwest City, Oklahoma
8,090 posts, read 4,699,735 times
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Who gives a crap? Why does it matter? I'm going to have to agree with Morgan Freeman in regards to black history month. It needs to be gotten rid of it. The whole concept of it is ridiculous. And only exists because of a combination of guilt and insecurity. And solves nothing.

I promise you, white people don't give a flying crap about black history month. Everyone who isn't black, is basically annoyed that it even exists, and while they appreciate history, they don't think it matters to hear about the first black person to graduate from New Mexico state university. Anymore than it might be interesting to hear about the first Jew or Muslim to graduate from that university. The only people it matters to, are the insecure groups, that see themselves as separate from the rest of society. And the existence of things like black history month, simply reminds of us our difference. And thus, perpetuates such divisions.


I don't believe that black history month has had any benefit to America. I think it has done far more harm than good, and needs to be eliminated.
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Old 02-20-2013, 06:47 AM
 
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There is no picture of him that I can find to post, so I'll just tell my story. His name is Benjamin Campbell. Around Charleston S.C. he was known as the Peanut Man. He walked around downtown for over forty years selling peanuts to people. He wore a top hat, suspenders, and a bow tie. He sang and danced and put on a show for families and children. He would educate the crowd on how peanuts were grown and cooked and talk about his family's farm and history. He was truly an entertainer! Every time we went downtown, I always wanted to see the Peanut Man, I would sit and listen intently each time, captivated by his voice and smile. Everyday was National Peanut Day! He always remembered me, and would pat me on the head and give me a bag of boiled peanuts.

"Hey! Hey! What I say? Got some boiled and I got some toasted, got some greened and I got some roasted! Oh yeah! Peanut Man! Uh huh! Catch em if ya can! Got some hot and I got some cold, got some dig down deep into ya soul! Oh yeah! It's the Peanut Man! Uh huh! Catch em if ya can!"
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Old 02-20-2013, 08:12 AM
 
Location: La lune et les étoiles
17,611 posts, read 18,999,465 times
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Florence Mills



She was born in 1895, to ex-slaves in a Washington, D.C. slum. By the age of four, she was performing on stage. By the 1920s, she was the toast of Broadway and London and the first black woman featured in Vogue. Her trademark song, ‘I'm a Little Blackbird Looking for a Bluebird’ was a protest against racial inequality. Mills died in 1927, aged only 31.
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Old 02-20-2013, 08:13 AM
 
Location: La lune et les étoiles
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Elizabeth Freeman (c.1742 – December 28, 1829)



In early life known as Bett and later Mum Bett, was among the first black slaves in Massachusetts to file a "freedom suit" and win in court under the 1780 constitution, with a ruling that slavery was illegal. The ruling was considered to have informally ended slavery in the state. After winning her freedom, she worked for her attorney, Theodore Sedgwick, whose daughter Catharine wrote an account of her life.
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Old 02-20-2013, 08:18 AM
 
Location: La lune et les étoiles
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Constance Baker Motley was born on September 14, 1921 in New Haven, Connecticut. In 1964 Judge Motley entered politics. She was the first woman to be elected into the New York State Senate in 1964 and in 1965 became the first woman to hold the position of Manhattan Borough President. President Lyndon B. Johnson appointed Motley to the United States District Court in 1966, making her the first African American woman to hold a Federal Judgeship.

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Old 02-20-2013, 08:21 AM
 
Location: La lune et les étoiles
17,611 posts, read 18,999,465 times
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Patricia Roberts Harris (May 31, 1924 – March 23, 1985)



She served in the administration of President Jimmy Carter as United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, and United States Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare (which office was renamed Secretary of Health and Human Services during her tenure). She was the first African American woman to serve in the United States Cabinet, and the first to enter the line of succession to the Presidency. She previously served as United States Ambassador to Luxembourg under President Lyndon B. Johnson, and was the first African-American woman to represent the United States as an ambassador.
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Old 02-20-2013, 08:23 AM
 
Location: La lune et les étoiles
17,611 posts, read 18,999,465 times
Reputation: 18918
Charlotte Forten was born on August 17, 1837, in Philadelphia, PA. She kept a diary of her involvement with the abolition movement and became the first African-American hired to teach white students in Salem, MA. In 1862, Forten participated in the Port Royal Experiment, educating ex-slaves on St. Helena Island, South Carolina and recording her experiences in a series of essays. She died in 1914.

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