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Old 02-05-2013, 03:35 AM
 
Location: Where they serve real ale.
7,249 posts, read 6,646,883 times
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When the 1994 Federal assault weapon ban was passed, gun manufacturers took immediate action to 'sporterize' assault weapons that were banned. These changes enabled them to circumvent the law with new models that were legal. Opponents of the assault weapon (AW) argue that kept the law from being a useful tool for crime.

Critics point to FBI crime statistics before and after the AW ban as evidence it was ineffective. But that's a not so clever attempt to show cause and effect. It diverts attention from data that shows the ban was effective.

To get an accurate picture of the effect of the assault weapon ban, you have to look at data about assault weapons used in crimes, not overall crime trends. The relevant set of data is gun traces by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) -- guns that were used in crimes, including assault weapons.

The Department of Justice funded a study of ATF gun trace data to produce a report on the effectiveness of the assault weapons ban. The report is "Updated Assessment of the Federal Assault Weapons Ban: Impacts on Gun Markets and Gun Violence, 1994-2003", July 2004.

Figure 6-1 is Police Recoveries of Assault Weapons Reported to ATF (1990-2002). Section 6.2.2.1 has a further explanation of figure 6-1: Quote:
Quote:
6.2.2.1 As shown in Figure 6-1, AWs declined from 5.4% of crime gun traces in 1992-1993 to 1.6% in 2001-2002, a decline of 70%.
Crime Gun Solutions LLC, a firm of former law enforcement officials, is a leading source of crime-gun expertise. It reported
Quote:
In the five year period (1990-1994) before enactment of the Federal Assault Weapons Act, assault weapons named in the Act constituted 4.82% of the crime gun traces ATF conducted nationwide. Since the law's enactment, however, these assault weapons have made up only 1.61% of the guns ATF has traced to crime - a drop of 66% from the pre-ban rate.
The government funded an earlier study of the AW ban that issued a report in 2001. It said deaths from firearms were increasing during the the 1980s and peaked in 1993 at 39,595. The Brady Law and the Assault Weapons Act went into effect in 1994. Following that, firearm deaths per year dropped to 29,573 in 2001, a drop of 25% from the 1994 level.

Data points (1999 and 2000 gun traces)

ATF 2000 general findings
Quote:
The imported North China Industries 7.62mm rifle constitutes 6 percent (1,151) of all long gun trace requests and ranks third for long guns among all age groups.
ATF 1999 general findings
Quote:
The imported North China Industries 7.62mm rifle constituted 6 percent (873) of all long gun trace requests, the third most frequent trace requests for long guns among all age groups.

Table 8b shows that for all age groups, the North China Industries Model SKS 7.62mm caliber rifle is the rifle model most frequently encountered by law enforcement officers. The North China Industries Model MAK90 7.62mm caliber rifle is also encountered in significant numbers, and the Colt Model AR15 .223 caliber rifle is among the long guns most frequently recovered from adult possessors. These rifles, as well as most other rifles, will pose an enhanced threat to law enforcement, in part, because of their ability to expel projectiles at velocities that are capable of penetrating the type of soft body armor typically worn by the average police officer.
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Old 02-05-2013, 04:08 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
648 posts, read 520,498 times
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Neat.

Ban them again. See what happens.
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Old 02-05-2013, 05:05 AM
 
Location: Old Bellevue, WA
18,794 posts, read 14,225,380 times
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whole thing is an "alice in wonderland" exercise. I have 2 Springfield M1A rifles, both purchased in the 1990's. One is an "assault weapon" under the 1994 'AWB' law. The other isn't. They are fully identical, except that the 'assault weapon' gun has a bayonet attachment point.

Now would you be less likely to be shot with the M1A with the bayonet lug after 1994? Arguably, yes, because it went up in value, and was much more likely to be stored away, rather than taken out and shot. I have never fired mine. I have several other M1A's that I take when I go shooting.

So statistically, yes, I can see where the AWB did tend to remove the pre-ban guns from circulation. But only a delusional, raving, IMBECILE would define "effectiveness" as getting shot with an M1A w/o bayonet lug, as opposed to with. And that is exactly what this purported analysis does.

So instead of a 'myth,' now we've got a raving delusion...I'm not sure that's progress.
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Old 02-05-2013, 05:13 AM
 
Location: 77441
3,161 posts, read 3,818,161 times
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blah blah blah
you havent done anything but cherry pick information to suite your purpose.
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Old 02-05-2013, 05:20 AM
 
Location: Sango, TN
24,889 posts, read 21,009,027 times
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This is not a one to one correlation.

Yes, after the assault weapons ban, violence decreased. Also, it was after the first gulf war, did that have the same effect on violence?

The decrease in crime in the mid 90s into the 21st century was about economic growth. Its why crime is increasing now.
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Old 02-05-2013, 05:21 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
10,032 posts, read 7,108,901 times
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This was an assault weapon under the previous federal ban:




This was not:





Please explain again how the ban was effective. Thanks.
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Old 02-05-2013, 05:27 AM
 
Location: somewhere in the woods
16,885 posts, read 13,000,772 times
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Quote:
The imported North China Industries 7.62mm rifle constituted 6 percent (873) of all long gun trace requests, the third most frequent trace requests for long guns among all age groups.

Table 8b shows that for all age groups, the North China Industries Model SKS 7.62mm caliber rifle is the rifle model most frequently encountered by law enforcement officers. The North China Industries Model MAK90 7.62mm caliber rifle is also encountered in significant numbers, and the Colt Model AR15 .223 caliber rifle is among the long guns most frequently recovered from adult possessors. These rifles, as well as most other rifles, will pose an enhanced threat to law enforcement, in part, because of their ability to expel projectiles at velocities that are capable of penetrating the type of soft body armor typically worn by the average police officer.

guess what, the smaller the caliber of the bullet, the more likely it is to go through body armor. so 22 LR is more likely than 556 to go through a cops or private citizens body armor. I do notice that you like to pick and choose what information you have in your OP.

no matter what rifle a person shoots, some calibers will always go through body armor. I have more than 1 rifle at home that will go through level 3 body armor with level 4 plates very easily.
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Old 02-05-2013, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
10,032 posts, read 7,108,901 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeywrenching View Post
guess what, the smaller the caliber of the bullet, the more likely it is to go through body armor. so 22 LR is more likely than 556 to go through a cops or private citizens body armor. I do notice that you like to pick and choose what information you have in your OP.

no matter what rifle a person shoots, some calibers will always go through body armor. I have more than 1 rifle at home that will go through level 3 body armor with level 4 plates very easily.
You do know that caliber refers to the diameter of the bullet- right? Go to a unit converter and convert 5.56 mm to inches and see what you get.
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Old 02-05-2013, 05:37 AM
 
16,438 posts, read 19,088,771 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeywrenching View Post
guess what, the smaller the caliber of the bullet, the more likely it is to go through body armor. so 22 LR is more likely than 556 to go through a cops or private citizens body armor..
The 5.56mm you refer to is also .22 caliber in diameter, but it has a heavier bullet and much more powder in the cartridge and is thus much more likely to penetrate body armor than a .22LR.
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Old 02-05-2013, 05:42 AM
 
Location: somewhere in the woods
16,885 posts, read 13,000,772 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
The 5.56mm you refer to is also .22 caliber in diameter, but it has a heavier bullet and much more powder in the cartridge and is thus much more likely to penetrate body armor than a .22LR.


not actually, the 5.56 bullet is actually a .224 inch bullet, whereas a 22lr bullet is a .22 -.223 diameter bullet depending on the manufacturer. most tend to be on the .221 inch for a 22LR round. not much of a difference, but still a difference.

most reloaders that reload .223/5.56 would have already known this.

yes it can penetrate body armor, but any round can penetrate body armor if used properly. this is just an attempt by feinstein to get more type of crap banned. sort of like the bullet and plane debate, what a crock it is.
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