U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Hip Hop-Art or Poison?
Art 23 44.23%
Poison 29 55.77%
Voters: 52. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-21-2013, 10:27 PM
 
2,665 posts, read 4,700,116 times
Reputation: 842

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by BMOREBOY View Post
In my opinion, to a degree it has caused a uprising amongst the black youth that can either be positive or negative; example: Lupe Fiasco is the type of hip-hop artist that has garnished an intellectual audience whom will protest against wars, don't believe in the US gov't, and whatever else anarchist are against while a rapper (notice the distinction between Hip-Hop artist and Rapper) such as Gucci Mane has a audience that are deeply intertwined with poverty, wouldn't mind shooting someone without a reason, and etc. Now I'm in the middle, my taste in music is very eclectic therefore I can listen to Gucci Mane for hours on in and switch to Cyndi Lauper's 'Girl Just Want To Have Fun'. As stated in my last sentence I can listen to Gucci Mane and listen to his message yet I won't follow through with his message because I'm not ignorant, obtuse, or oblivious to the dangers of the lifestyle he speaks on, with Lupe Fiasco there's a different story; I can listen to his message and take a few pieces of the message and apply it to my life because at times his message just seems so close to home such as the message in his song "He Say, She Say".

Rap can encourage criminal behavior at times, hip-hop artist such as Eminem, Tupac, Etc. have been in legal trouble for their very anti-establishment messages that may provoke one to do something such as take up arms at law enforcement agents (I think the song claimed to have provoked it was "I Just Don't Give A ****" by Tupac). And even lesser offenses such as drug use (which isn't limited to hip-hop) can originate from rap, look at the latest fad, Mollies, I had caucasian friends years back that were taking them but since some rapper said it in a song many of the youth regardless of race have now decided to try a molly. Influence from musicians isn't limited to Rap/Hip-Hop, but its by far the most influential genre now and anyone who denies that just won't admit that it is. I went to a baseball game the other day and they were playing some rap in the stadium and people of all races, ages, and etc. were actually bobbing their heads to it, maybe they didn't hear the lyrics but nonetheless they heard the beat.

Now on to your journey as a hip-hop artist, I wish you luck with that because I use to be a hip-hop artist myself that received acclaim amongst my classmates and I tell you its tough. I didn't do the little 'swag' thing, I spoke on racial, economic, political, etc. issues, while my peers were talking about guns; I sort of gave up on the dream of becoming a hip-hop artist although today if I made a song I'd probably be at the top of my game with all I know about music now.

So hip-hop as any musical genre can be poison, but its just as much an art. I think Jay-Z sums it up well on how I see hip-hop:

Hip-hop has done so much for racial relations, and I don't think it's given the proper credit. It has changed America immensely. I'm going to make a very bold statement: Hip-hop has done more than any leader, politician, or anyone to improve race relations.-Jay-Z
best post on here so far, agree completely
and im not really tryin to make a career out of it plus i rap in russian mostly anyway
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-21-2013, 10:28 PM
 
3,939 posts, read 7,495,820 times
Reputation: 1492
Someone who says they are a big hip hop listener should know the difference between hip hop (life stories of the streets and hard lives) and rap (gangstas with guns and cars).

Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2013, 10:32 PM
 
2,665 posts, read 4,700,116 times
Reputation: 842
Quote:
Originally Posted by kayfouroh View Post
Someone who says they are a big hip hop listener should know the difference between hip hop (life stories of the streets and hard lives) and rap (gangstas with guns and cars).

Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2
well, its all rap technically, rapping is one of the elements of hip hop, even tho i kno wat u sayin
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2013, 10:44 PM
 
39 posts, read 55,265 times
Reputation: 33
True hip hop is an art form and started as an outlet for young African Americans to express themselves in a positive manner instead of fighting it out. If you have ever seen a rap battle, two dudes will go at each other talking about the other ones clothes or appearance it was a way to settle who was the better man. Somewhere along the line hip hop started becoming violent as rappers began portraying everyday street life in the ghetto. However it became so popular that people who weren't associated with crime and drugs were portraying that in their music referred to as a studio gangster. Things have gone downhill from there the industry is now full of imposters and people trying to make some money. Hip Hop is slowly dying on the mainstream level. All people care about now is money so they are more concerned with making hit singles with catchy choruses that will attract the attention of suburban kids willing to buy ringtones and songs from itunes. The hip hop of today sucks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2013, 11:05 PM
 
259 posts, read 197,416 times
Reputation: 101
The melody in Hip Hop is neutral. It's neither good or evil. Moral or immoral. Art or poison.

It's the message that always takes it from one to the other. And the messages over time have become more and more saturated in negativity.

The people it affects the most are those from low income environments and broken families where they don't have any positive role models to counterbalance those harmful themes.

The message in Hip Hop like many messages in forms of entertainment is moral relativism. There's basically no redeeming value whatsoever in the dominant message that is pushed by the corporate owners of music.

The modern version of Hip Hop is one of the major contributors to the decline of true manhood and womanhood and the family.

Destroying the family may not be the end goal of those who culture the pop culture, but it sure is the byproduct.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2013, 11:13 PM
 
259 posts, read 197,416 times
Reputation: 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by BMOREBOY View Post
So hip-hop as any musical genre can be poison, but its just as much an art. I think Jay-Z sums it up well on how I see hip-hop:

Hip-hop has done so much for racial relations, and I don't think it's given the proper credit. It has changed America immensely. I'm going to make a very bold statement: Hip-hop has done more than any leader, politician, or anyone to improve race relations.-Jay-Z
That might be one of the most ignorant statements ever uttered in the history of humanity.

But of course he would say something like that which is a slap in the face to every leader of the past like a Frederick Douglas, WEB DuBois, or a Martin Luther King Jr.

In fact if they were alive today, they would probably think that Hip Hop was a deliberate plot to destroy the black community. They probably would think this was some sort of sick minstrel show enjoyed by a racist audience. They would be astounded to think that this was a legitimate form of entertainment that was even enjoyed by blacks.

You think just because white people buy rap albums that means that Jay-Z has bridged the gap between whites and blacks? If anything those kids who buy that music are even more disassociated from reality
and believe the stereotypes in music are reflective of reality.

BTW, how's the bridging the gap in terms of wealth, health, or any other category that Jay-Z the corporate mouthpiece doesn't seem too concerned about?

But I don't blame him. Just like he said in one of his albums, the rap game is like the crack game.

He's just the equivalent of a drug dealer
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2013, 01:39 AM
 
910 posts, read 1,135,515 times
Reputation: 594
Quote:
Originally Posted by desertdetroiter View Post
Ewwwwww....that's a toughie.

Crouch and Marsalis are traditionalists. Like them, i recognize that traditional jazz is superior, but I don't get so bogged down in it that I don't appreciate the later stuff.

Look, B*tches Brew isn't ever gonna be considered to be as great as Kind of Blue or Birth of the Cool. That's because it isn't. But B*tches Brew is still one hell of an album. But I sympathize somewhat with the traditionalists in that a bunch of post 1969 stuff is horrible. They also hate the fact that guys like Donald Byrd and Hubert Laws started making quasi-funk/rhythm and blues based jazz. My dad hates that stuff too. But I really love a lot of stuff that came out on labels like CTI and Blue Note in the 70's. That stuff is funky.

But I do agree that Stanley Crouch can be overbearing in his traditionalism. Some of the jazz debates he participates in are hilarious, but he comes off like a fool half the time. A cranky ass fool.
Yeah I mean Crouch knows his stuff and I can see his point. A lot of fusion is terrible, but nobody can deny that Billy Cobham absolutely destroys behind the kit or that Herbie Hancock's Sextant is still ahead of the times. And that's not even getting into AACM or the NYC Downtown guys. But critical ossification is what killed classical music, and it's pretty much killed jazz.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2013, 02:29 AM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
19,398 posts, read 13,067,655 times
Reputation: 14120
Hip hop is just another pop music. All pop music is like eating cotton candy- it looks big and fluffy, but it's gone in an instant, never to rise again.

However, as with all pop music, there's always just enough meaningful stuff that will survive. Some of it shows real songcraft to me, and who knows? Our American list of evergreen music- the music that never grows old- is always growing longer. The Great American Songbook has a unique way of touching hearts all over the world.

The best hip hop will take it's place alongside all the other forms of once popular music that was once only cotton candy to earlier generations. Most of it will be forgotten in a few years.

And, as always, older people will be sure the music that replaces hip hop will drag the kids straight down to hell. That's a part of our music that is always the same. The fact is, most folks prefer the music they liked best when they were 18 for the rest of their lives.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2013, 09:17 AM
 
47,314 posts, read 24,684,686 times
Reputation: 14471
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATTC View Post
That might be one of the most ignorant statements ever uttered in the history of humanity.

But of course he would say something like that which is a slap in the face to every leader of the past like a Frederick Douglas, WEB DuBois, or a Martin Luther King Jr.

In fact if they were alive today, they would probably think that Hip Hop was a deliberate plot to destroy the black community. They probably would think this was some sort of sick minstrel show enjoyed by a racist audience. They would be astounded to think that this was a legitimate form of entertainment that was even enjoyed by blacks.

You think just because white people buy rap albums that means that Jay-Z has bridged the gap between whites and blacks? If anything those kids who buy that music are even more disassociated from reality
and believe the stereotypes in music are reflective of reality.

BTW, how's the bridging the gap in terms of wealth, health, or any other category that Jay-Z the corporate mouthpiece doesn't seem too concerned about?

But I don't blame him. Just like he said in one of his albums, the rap game is like the crack game.

He's just the equivalent of a drug dealer
Jay might be bloviating a good bit, but he's not entirely wrong either.

I do believe that the rock and roll era (an era under which rap falls), has done a lot to unite people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2013, 09:30 AM
 
17,497 posts, read 10,145,789 times
Reputation: 6744
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldawg82 View Post
I hate hip-hop and rap - but it is protected speech and expression.
Too bad some don't get even protected speech is offensive and can be very poisionious.....I think the problem with some of the music is the way they speak about women. The music does seem to glamorize gun violence and legal gun owners are taking the heat.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top