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Old 06-13-2013, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Northern CA
12,770 posts, read 9,836,951 times
Reputation: 4243

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Thank you, Supreme Court. This ruling was unanimous.

Today's ruling also means that men and women will have access to far less expensive testing for gene sequences in their own bodies. Currently, women who want to test themselves for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes must pay as much as $4,000 for the test due to the monopoly "ownership" of those genes by Myriad Genetics. But now that the Supreme Court has ruled such patents are invalid, prices for the test should drastically fall over time as competition enters the picture. Ultimately, the test could eventually be offered for as little as $100.

The ruling also means that other companies can conduct research on those genes without first seeking permission from Myriad. This will actually spur more innovation, potentially leading to more advanced genetic analysis tests that might help people better understand their health risks (and hopefully encourage them to change their diets and lifestyle choices to avoid expressing those genes).

We must all thank the ACLU on this decision, as it was the ACLU which argued this to victory.

"Over the last 30 years, the U.S. Patent Office has issued patents on thousands of human genes, including genes associated with colon cancer, Alzheimer's disease, muscular dystrophy, and many other devastating diseases. The status quo meant that companies controlling gene patents had the right to stop all other scientists from examining, studying, testing, and researching

Learn more: Sanity prevails: US Supreme Court rules that human genes are not eligible for patent protection
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Old 06-13-2013, 05:24 PM
 
19,373 posts, read 17,476,403 times
Reputation: 10580
I wanted to patent the fraud gene. Milli Vanilli had it. Lance Armstrong had it. Barry Bonds had it. And Barack Obama has it.
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Old 06-13-2013, 09:34 PM
 
14,920 posts, read 11,161,316 times
Reputation: 4828
Another win for the ACLU
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Old 06-14-2013, 03:26 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,825 posts, read 20,219,764 times
Reputation: 6487
Quote:
Originally Posted by claudhopper View Post
Thank you, Supreme Court. This ruling was unanimous.

Today's ruling also means that men and women will have access to far less expensive testing for gene sequences in their own bodies. Currently, women who want to test themselves for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes must pay as much as $4,000 for the test due to the monopoly "ownership" of those genes by Myriad Genetics. But now that the Supreme Court has ruled such patents are invalid, prices for the test should drastically fall over time as competition enters the picture. Ultimately, the test could eventually be offered for as little as $100.

The ruling also means that other companies can conduct research on those genes without first seeking permission from Myriad. This will actually spur more innovation, potentially leading to more advanced genetic analysis tests that might help people better understand their health risks (and hopefully encourage them to change their diets and lifestyle choices to avoid expressing those genes).

We must all thank the ACLU on this decision, as it was the ACLU which argued this to victory.

"Over the last 30 years, the U.S. Patent Office has issued patents on thousands of human genes, including genes associated with colon cancer, Alzheimer's disease, muscular dystrophy, and many other devastating diseases. The status quo meant that companies controlling gene patents had the right to stop all other scientists from examining, studying, testing, and researching

Learn more: Sanity prevails: US Supreme Court rules that human genes are not eligible for patent protection
That is not entirely true. What the Supreme Court actually decided was that natural genes may not be patented. Artificially created genes, such a cDNA (complimentary DNA) can be patented.
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Old 06-14-2013, 04:36 AM
 
Location: Earth
24,639 posts, read 24,819,132 times
Reputation: 11318
Quote:
Originally Posted by claudhopper View Post
Thank you, Supreme Court. This ruling was unanimous.

Today's ruling also means that men and women will have access to far less expensive testing for gene sequences in their own bodies. Currently, women who want to test themselves for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes must pay as much as $4,000 for the test due to the monopoly "ownership" of those genes by Myriad Genetics. But now that the Supreme Court has ruled such patents are invalid, prices for the test should drastically fall over time as competition enters the picture. Ultimately, the test could eventually be offered for as little as $100.

The ruling also means that other companies can conduct research on those genes without first seeking permission from Myriad. This will actually spur more innovation, potentially leading to more advanced genetic analysis tests that might help people better understand their health risks (and hopefully encourage them to change their diets and lifestyle choices to avoid expressing those genes).

We must all thank the ACLU on this decision, as it was the ACLU which argued this to victory.

"Over the last 30 years, the U.S. Patent Office has issued patents on thousands of human genes, including genes associated with colon cancer, Alzheimer's disease, muscular dystrophy, and many other devastating diseases. The status quo meant that companies controlling gene patents had the right to stop all other scientists from examining, studying, testing, and researching

Learn more: Sanity prevails: US Supreme Court rules that human genes are not eligible for patent protection
I absolutely agree.
Next, I'd like to see Congress reverse themselves on Monsanto and food products.

After the Citizens United decision and the Monsanto garbage, I was surprised that good sense at a high level of government prevailed.
Unanimously.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Icy Tea View Post
I wanted to patent the fraud gene. Milli Vanilli had it. Lance Armstrong had it. Barry Bonds had it. And Barack Obama has it.
I believe you own it.
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Old 06-14-2013, 04:42 AM
 
Location: Lower east side of Toronto
10,586 posts, read 10,766,202 times
Reputation: 9292
Nice to know that the state and their corporate masters are clever enough to say they do not own you and the herd...When in their minds they lust for mastership of humanity..I never trust anything that has a title starting with "supreme"//
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Old 06-14-2013, 04:45 AM
 
8,487 posts, read 5,901,600 times
Reputation: 1114
Quote:
Originally Posted by claudhopper View Post
Thank you, Supreme Court. This ruling was unanimous.

Today's ruling also means that men and women will have access to far less expensive testing for gene sequences in their own bodies. Currently, women who want to test themselves for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes must pay as much as $4,000 for the test due to the monopoly "ownership" of those genes by Myriad Genetics. But now that the Supreme Court has ruled such patents are invalid, prices for the test should drastically fall over time as competition enters the picture. Ultimately, the test could eventually be offered for as little as $100.

The ruling also means that other companies can conduct research on those genes without first seeking permission from Myriad. This will actually spur more innovation, potentially leading to more advanced genetic analysis tests that might help people better understand their health risks (and hopefully encourage them to change their diets and lifestyle choices to avoid expressing those genes).

We must all thank the ACLU on this decision, as it was the ACLU which argued this to victory.

"Over the last 30 years, the U.S. Patent Office has issued patents on thousands of human genes, including genes associated with colon cancer, Alzheimer's disease, muscular dystrophy, and many other devastating diseases. The status quo meant that companies controlling gene patents had the right to stop all other scientists from examining, studying, testing, and researching

Learn more: Sanity prevails: US Supreme Court rules that human genes are not eligible for patent protection
Yeah, but the way I read it. If you alter DNA you can patent it. So I don't see this as much of a victory.
Interesting they just had a supreme court case on DNA swabbing and arrest also.
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Old 06-14-2013, 04:48 AM
 
8,487 posts, read 5,901,600 times
Reputation: 1114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
That is not entirely true. What the Supreme Court actually decided was that natural genes may not be patented. Artificially created genes, such a cDNA (complimentary DNA) can be patented.
Yeah, that is how I read it also.
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Old 06-14-2013, 04:51 AM
 
Location: Lower east side of Toronto
10,586 posts, read 10,766,202 times
Reputation: 9292
Quote:
Originally Posted by CDusr View Post
Yeah, but the way I read it. If you alter DNA you can patent it. So I don't see this as much of a victory.
Interesting they just had a supreme court case on DNA swabbing and arrest also.
Here in Canada law enforcement are rushing to get cheek swabs from every person arrested whether convicted or not. It's a trend- they seem to want a DNA sample from every human being they can.
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Old 06-15-2013, 06:54 AM
 
8,487 posts, read 5,901,600 times
Reputation: 1114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oleg Bach View Post
Here in Canada law enforcement are rushing to get cheek swabs from every person arrested whether convicted or not. It's a trend- they seem to want a DNA sample from every human being they can.
Yeah I thought it interesting that this is around the same time.
I disagree that DNA samples are the same as photos or fingerprints. One is part of your body the other 2 are an impression of it. They say this is ok just from arrest nm any kind of conviction.
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