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Old 10-22-2013, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Austin
29,546 posts, read 16,475,253 times
Reputation: 8087

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You would think the yahoos in government would learn some things. Whenever they impose oppressive taxes on a product, the black market for that product will thrive.

Most pot consumers would rather go to their local store, purchase their products and pay a reasonable tax. Since pot is a plant, (IMHO) it should be taxed just like green beans and tomatoes. If excessive taxes are levied, then consumers will quickly go to the black market for their products. Colorado and especially Washington are certainly in danger of losing millions in tax revenue due to their ill advised heavy handed tax policy.
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When Congress banned marijuana in 1937, it did so in the guise of taxation, imposing a prohibitive levy on cannabis and created criminal penalties for those who failed to pay it. Marijuana taxes also played a prominent role in what may be the beginning of the end for pot prohibition: the legalization measures that voters in Colorado and Washington approved last fall.

Supporters of Washington's I-502 and Colorado’s Amendment 64 emphasized the revenue that the government could reap by recognizing cannabis production and distribution as a legitimate business. The tricky part, as officials in both states will soon discover, is balancing the desire for tax revenue against the desire to eliminate the black market created by prohibition. Or as UCLA drug policy expert Mark Kleiman, an adviser to Washington’s marijuana regulators, puts it: “What if we gave a pot legalization and nobody came?”

The dilemma is especially clear in Washington, where I-502 specified a 25 percent excise tax at three levels: sales between producers and processors, between processors and retailers, and between retailers and consumers. That’s in addition to the standard state sales tax of 8.75 percent.

Will Legal Pot Cost More Than Black-Market Pot? - Reason.com

 
Old 10-22-2013, 03:34 PM
 
11,087 posts, read 6,987,070 times
Reputation: 6366
You didn't really think this would be cheap, did you?
 
Old 10-22-2013, 03:39 PM
 
39,450 posts, read 40,753,065 times
Reputation: 16253
I'm assuming that growing it for personal use is no longer illegal?

That will be the killer for both the legal and black market if they both remain expensive.
 
Old 10-22-2013, 03:40 PM
 
4,130 posts, read 3,854,852 times
Reputation: 3041
I'd rather pay more to have a pure product, and not one with faked crap or laced with junk.
 
Old 10-22-2013, 03:40 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,705,729 times
Reputation: 9029
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goinback2011 View Post
You didn't really think this would be cheap, did you?
Its a plant, there isnt much hard labor into planting something and watching it grow.
 
Old 10-22-2013, 03:43 PM
 
725 posts, read 483,231 times
Reputation: 549
The good people of CO and WA state have already considered that and are strongly focused on keeping the cost of the product at or near street level. So what you claim they will "soon discover" has already been factored in by people that write laws for a living. In fact its one of their main concerns. Even if it were to cost slightly more, people would still choose it over the possibility of getting arrested or fined. You bring up an interesting point, but have failed to consider people deeply immersed in this, for years now, have already thought of this and are dealing with it.
 
Old 10-22-2013, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,825 posts, read 20,217,314 times
Reputation: 6487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadking2003 View Post
You would think the yahoos in government would learn some things. Whenever they impose oppressive taxes on a product, the black market for that product will thrive.

Most pot consumers would rather go to their local store, purchase their products and pay a reasonable tax. Since pot is a plant, (IMHO) it should be taxed just like green beans and tomatoes. If excessive taxes are levied, then consumers will quickly go to the black market for their products. Colorado and especially Washington are certainly in danger of losing millions in tax revenue due to their ill advised heavy handed tax policy.
------
When Congress banned marijuana in 1937, it did so in the guise of taxation, imposing a prohibitive levy on cannabis and created criminal penalties for those who failed to pay it. Marijuana taxes also played a prominent role in what may be the beginning of the end for pot prohibition: the legalization measures that voters in Colorado and Washington approved last fall.

Supporters of Washington's I-502 and Colorado’s Amendment 64 emphasized the revenue that the government could reap by recognizing cannabis production and distribution as a legitimate business. The tricky part, as officials in both states will soon discover, is balancing the desire for tax revenue against the desire to eliminate the black market created by prohibition. Or as UCLA drug policy expert Mark Kleiman, an adviser to Washington’s marijuana regulators, puts it: “What if we gave a pot legalization and nobody came?”

The dilemma is especially clear in Washington, where I-502 specified a 25 percent excise tax at three levels: sales between producers and processors, between processors and retailers, and between retailers and consumers. That’s in addition to the standard state sales tax of 8.75 percent.

Will Legal Pot Cost More Than Black-Market Pot? - Reason.com
Congress did not ban marijuana in 1937, they taxed it. With the issuance of a marijuana tax stamp, farmers in mid-western States were growing marijuana legally until 1945. After 1945 no more marijuana tax stamps have been issued. The Boggs Act of 1952 and the Narcotics Control Act of 1956 is what made marijuana illegal at the federal level, not the Marijuana Tax Act of 1937.

Now you understand why legalization is a very bad idea. I will never pay a tax on a weed. That is like trying to tax dandelions.

Marijuana should be decriminalized, not legalized.
 
Old 10-22-2013, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Tyler, TX
15,202 posts, read 18,249,480 times
Reputation: 8032
Why not just check the prices yourself?

https://weedmaps.com/dispensaries/ne...c=dispensaries
 
Old 10-22-2013, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,825 posts, read 20,217,314 times
Reputation: 6487
Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
I'm assuming that growing it for personal use is no longer illegal?

That will be the killer for both the legal and black market if they both remain expensive.
Growing marijuana for personal use has been legal in Alaska since 1975. However, it is illegal to buy or sell marijuana. Once money changes hands it becomes "commercial use" and is no longer considered "personal use."
 
Old 10-22-2013, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
6,942 posts, read 7,773,903 times
Reputation: 5694
Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
Its a plant, there isnt much hard labor into planting something and watching it grow.
Yeah, try that and see how it works out for you. Just as an fyi, the process of growing quality marijuana isn't quite like growing a flower garden. Issues such as nutrients, hydration, light cycles, and others make it quite a bit more difficult than just planting it and watching it grow.

ETA: There's a reason why people spend thousands of dollars on grow-room setups, and it isn't just to hide their activity from the authorities.
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