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Old 12-05-2013, 09:12 AM
 
Location: East St. Paul 651 forever (or North St. Paul) .
2,869 posts, read 2,718,873 times
Reputation: 1446

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amy1190 View Post
Why is there so much bashing of the under 25's on here? You sound like a bunch of disgruntled old farts.
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedneksRdum View Post
Why does it seem so many of the older generation are so paranoid? Paranoid of everything from taking guns, to immigrants, to college professors "bending" history, to the EPA, to education agencies, to an intruder standing on every corner waiting to rob you, to countries wanting to attack us all the time . Good lord, would you people get a grip? That's not freedom, that's being a prisoner of paranoia. It's like we are in a perpetual state of war against the govt, against other countries, against ourselves
I'm 32 and I'm as paranoid as anyone when it comes to the government. In fact probably more so than a lot of people older than me.
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Old 12-05-2013, 09:31 AM
 
44,699 posts, read 43,237,894 times
Reputation: 14435
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedneksRdum View Post
Generation Y checking in here.. (30 y/o male). Good job (same one since I was 21), been working since I was 15. But, because I don't buy some of the bigoted views of my elder generations (namely boomers) I am whiney, need to grow up, etc. sweeping generalizations of a whole generation....although I will say, there are plenty enough slackers to go around in my generation no doubt. See them every day. But not everyone is. Maybe because I am the older part of the millennials, I don't know.
I'm on the other side of the millennials (I was born in 1986). I know many people who are hard workers, who are doing well. That is also I reason I don't buy the idea of millennials being "whiney". It was a millennial that started facebook (Mark Zuckerberg is 29 years old, and started it when he was barely 20).

I've been around places like McDonalds, Wendy's and other fast food places(places I never want to eat at ever again). I saw my share of millennials working there.

I think at this point in time, however, there are fewer jobs to go around that before for the number of people around. And there is less emphasis on many blue collar jobs. I don't think this has anything to do with be "a slacker". I believe this has more to do with trying to get those in Generation Y out of the blue collar industry and into the white collar industry. Ever since I was young, there has been an emphasis on getting a white collar job.
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Old 12-05-2013, 09:33 AM
 
44,699 posts, read 43,237,894 times
Reputation: 14435
Quote:
Originally Posted by Govie View Post
I'm 32 and I'm as paranoid as anyone when it comes to the government. In fact probably more so than a lot of people older than me.
My father is 59 years old, and I've never seen any kind of paranoia from him about the government. Somewhat distrustful? Yes. However, he doesn't seem at all paranoid of the government.
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Old 12-05-2013, 09:35 AM
 
Location: East St. Paul 651 forever (or North St. Paul) .
2,869 posts, read 2,718,873 times
Reputation: 1446
Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
My father is 59 years old, and I've never seen any kind of paranoia from him about the government. Somewhat distrustful? Yes. However, he doesn't seem at all paranoid of the government.
Exactly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RedneksRdum View Post
I don't like politicians, they lie period. But the govt as a whole, no, not scared. Not paranoid in the least. I couldn't live in a perpetual state of paranoia Of course I disagree with certain things the govt does, but that's, in my opinion anyway, part of me being an adult. Accepting some things I disagree with.
I just don't trust 'em...at all.
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Old 12-05-2013, 09:38 AM
 
2,836 posts, read 3,010,602 times
Reputation: 1399
Why can't "Millenials" grow up? Because they're not kicked out of the house!
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Old 12-05-2013, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Middle of nowhere
19,463 posts, read 9,779,260 times
Reputation: 7550
My two oldest children are millennials. One went into the navy right out of HS, and is training to be an aircraft mechanic. The other is in college, on a full ride scholarship, and works full time to pay his living expenses. He even refused our offers to pay his rent for a couple of months after his recent surgery.

Yep, both of them are lazy children who refuse to grow up.
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Old 12-05-2013, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Wherever I happen to be at the moment
1,229 posts, read 1,090,146 times
Reputation: 1836
Quote:
Originally Posted by Govie View Post
We should be blaming the baby boomers - they are the generation that created us.
Absolutely! Blame them old farts. Or take a clue from Washington and blame Bush for all the ills of the Millennial generation. But also blame the "Greatest (WW II) Generation" while you're at it. After all, they created the Boomers. And who created them?

Oh my! Just keep going back and pretty soon, Adam and Eve who created Cain and Abel will be the villains.

Now then, as the parent of some pretty darn successful children ranging in age from 26 to 43, all of whom have made their own way in life, I'm not real sympathetic to all the whining and blaming I read here. And, yes! I'm a Boomer. In fact, having been born in 1946 I'm one of the first, bona fide, original Boomers. Big deal!
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Old 12-05-2013, 09:54 AM
 
44,699 posts, read 43,237,894 times
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Quote:
This is my thoughts. My generation was sold a lie that we heard enough that we believed it. Doesn't help that we heard it from many different voices and from different authorities whether it was parents, politicians, educators or guidance counselors. Now we go in and get out doing what we want and can't find it and then complained when we don't want to do labor because we didn't cultivate those skills. I rarely touched a drill after shop class in 8th grade. I am sure others in my age group have similar experiences.
I will chime in on my thoughts. I don't think we were so much sold a lie as things were never really thought out. No one ever saw the economy tanking in the late 2000s. I was taught that a college education was very helpful in getting a decent paying job. The main pusher for this was not my teachers, but my father. He has a college degree(2 of them actually), and he has a very good job as an engineer. However, even he had a few brushes with layoffs. That being said, I looked to him as an example.

When an example of someone with a university degree is your own father, it makes it easier to understand that a college education is important. He frequently told me that if I didn't want to do hard manual labor for the remainder of my life, I should get an education. I was a small guy in high school(5'5" and weighed between 115-120 lbs), so for me, I dreaded the idea of doing such things.

Another thing to consider was this. In my high school, there were two tracks, the college prep and the tech prep. One thing I saw with the persons who entered the tech prep track was this: Many chose it because it was easy, because they didn't see themselves as ever going to college. Many kids never entered any kind of technical work or developed a skill of any kind. It was more or less "do enough to get by". Some kids planned on doing something like going on to technical school. Some, however, chose that track because they didn't really want to do any work, and the way it was designed, the college prep track is harder.

It also goes to the way things were designed in high school. There were many kids who were in school who really had no interest in being in school. I am of the high school graduating class of 2004. My graduation class went from over 400 at the start, to 244 the day of graduation(it would have been 245, but one person died just before graduation). Most of my graduation class now has kids and are working blue collar jobs. However, there are many who did just enough to get by in high school, or dropped out altogether. Tech prep was suppose to prepare people for vocational training and/or technical school. However, some students took it as an easy way out.
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Old 12-05-2013, 09:57 AM
 
44,699 posts, read 43,237,894 times
Reputation: 14435
I look at this way. Being unemployed is not a sign of being a slacker. Not trying at all is a sign of being a slacker.
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Old 12-05-2013, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Buckeye, AZ
25,465 posts, read 14,563,377 times
Reputation: 9231
Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
I will chime in on my thoughts. I don't think we were so much sold a lie as things were never really thought out. No one ever saw the economy tanking in the late 2000s. I was taught that a college education was very helpful in getting a decent paying job. The main pusher for this was not my teachers, but my father. He has a college degree(2 of them actually), and he has a very good job as an engineer. However, even he had a few brushes with layoffs. That being said, I looked to him as an example.

When an example of someone with a university degree is your own father, it makes it easier to understand that a college education is important. He frequently told me that if I didn't want to do hard manual labor for the remainder of my life, I should get an education. I was a small guy in high school(5'5" and weighed between 115-120 lbs), so for me, I dreaded the idea of doing such things.

Another thing to consider was this. In my high school, there were two tracks, the college prep and the tech prep. One thing I saw with the persons who entered the tech prep track was this: Many chose it because it was easy, because they didn't see themselves as ever going to college. Many kids never entered any kind of technical work or developed a skill of any kind. It was more or less "do enough to get by". Some kids planned on doing something like going on to technical school. Some, however, chose that track because they didn't really want to do any work, and the way it was designed, the college prep track is harder.

It also goes to the way things were designed in high school. There were many kids who were in school who really had no interest in being in school. I am of the high school graduating class of 2004. My graduation class went from over 400 at the start, to 244 the day of graduation(it would have been 245, but one person died just before graduation). Most of my graduation class now has kids and are working blue collar jobs. However, there are many who did just enough to get by in high school, or dropped out altogether. Tech prep was suppose to prepare people for vocational training and/or technical school. However, some students took it as an easy way out.
I graduated one year later in 2005, I went to a high school in suburban New York and you basically had to fight to get into the trade program. A majority of my school's 200+ class graduated (I think one moved) and most went to college of some sort with most going to universities (I think one went into the Army right out of it.) I know in New York, a big reason for this were the regents which you were done with by the end of junior year (if you passed them all.) I hardly knew anyone from my school that couldn't pass them, even if they hated the subject. However with that, it left maybe two years to do BOCES (our trade program) if you fought for it. I only knew one person from my graduating class to take that route. The large majority took the traditional route because that's what they knew and didn't press for it. Had I been good at a trade at the time, I would have pushed to go into BOCES. I didn't and still don't. Not whining, just stating the truth with me.

Last edited by mkpunk; 12-05-2013 at 11:18 AM..
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