U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 01-27-2014, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
9,219 posts, read 8,310,003 times
Reputation: 20027

Advertisements

When someone tells me "No problem" it drives me crazy.

It is actually passive aggressive and suggests that yes, there is a problem.

 
Old 01-27-2014, 02:43 PM
 
1,176 posts, read 2,045,811 times
Reputation: 1405
What? So you say "Can you pass the salt?" and I say "No problem", then I'm being passive-aggressive and implying that it IS a problem?
 
Old 01-27-2014, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
9,219 posts, read 8,310,003 times
Reputation: 20027
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleonidas View Post
What? So you say "Can you pass the salt?" and I say "No problem", then I'm being passive-aggressive and implying that it IS a problem?
Yes. I would take it as you being bothered because I asked you to do something.
 
Old 01-27-2014, 03:20 PM
 
Location: South Minneapolis
4,762 posts, read 5,438,479 times
Reputation: 7007
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons View Post
Yes. I would take it as you being bothered because I asked you to do something.
You have misinterpreted. It's just an expression.

Do you think " you're welcome" as a response to thank you means you are not welcome, that "certainly" in response to pass the salt means certainly not?

No problem is not one of my favorite expressions, but it most certainly not passive aggressive. What would you have people say?
 
Old 01-27-2014, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Florida -
8,767 posts, read 10,848,423 times
Reputation: 16640
"No problem"... the new "You're Welcome" --- for those who say struggle for words when "Thank you" is the appropriate response.
 
Old 01-27-2014, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
9,219 posts, read 8,310,003 times
Reputation: 20027
Quote:
Originally Posted by jghorton View Post
"No problem"... the new "You're Welcome" --- for those who say struggle for words when "Thank you" is the appropriate response.
It does seem to be.
 
Old 01-27-2014, 11:02 PM
 
Location: PA
2,109 posts, read 1,850,489 times
Reputation: 5408
You can't always control what other people say - only your reaction. It only drives you crazy if you let it.

There are a lot worse things that people can say-and do.
 
Old 01-28-2014, 05:15 AM
 
2,932 posts, read 4,016,238 times
Reputation: 1781
I've had people ask "would it be a problem for you to do me a favor and watch my house for the weekend"?
Should I just say "no" ? That would seem like you don't want to do the favor. "No problem" would seem more appropriate.
 
Old 01-28-2014, 08:00 AM
 
7,936 posts, read 5,045,305 times
Reputation: 13596
"No problem" is akin to the Australian "No worries". The latter does not mean, “I’m a flippant nonchalant fellow who ignores pressing concerns and who lives strictly in the moment, and I sincerely recommend the same breezy attitude to you as well”. Rather, it means “I’ve accorded due diligence to the matter, whence you can rest assured and without worry”.

Similarly, “No problem” means “Rest assured that your request has not in the least importuned me, and indeed, whatever the initial problem may have been, which first triggered your concern, I shall duly solve it with no particular hardship on my part, as the matter is really quite easy”.
 
Old 01-28-2014, 08:24 AM
 
Location: New York City
4,036 posts, read 8,943,879 times
Reputation: 3703
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons View Post
Yes. I would take it as you being bothered because I asked you to do something.
It is an idiomatic expression. The French use the same construction: Pas de problème. The implied meaning is “it’s easy” or “it’s no trouble.” I suspect the negative form is used out of politeness. You’re deconstructing the language too much. A person could use it in an ironic, passive-aggressive way, but the task involved would have to be comparatively onerous or complicated—much more than simply passing the salt.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top