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Old 02-03-2015, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Denver
3,179 posts, read 2,620,552 times
Reputation: 2206

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Note, this thread is about opiates and NOT marijuana. Don't bring marijuana into the discussion.

Anyways, do you believe that softer opiates, such as hydrocodone and oxycodone lead to use of harder opiates: morphine, heroin, suboxone, or just really high tolerance usage of oxy and hydrocodone, even without the intention of going to harder usage before using the soft drugs at soft doses?

Do you believe that doctors should be more restrictive on giving prescriptions of opiates for non very intensive pain situations? Do you believe an oxycodone prescription is justified for a wisdom tooth surgery?

Do you think we educate people well enough on the effects of opiates? If not, what would you change?

Do you believe that restriction of access helps or hurts the opiate addiction problem? Do you think that some should be easy access while others should be tough access?


Alright, time for some fun facts I have learned while cruising other sites and forums about drugs (no hard sources for you guys here, sorry):

A lot of opiate users were occasional, recreational users for quite a while who turned to opiates when their lives turned to s***. Others were hooked from the get go. There doesn't seem to be a big group of recreational opiate users like there is those for users of marijuana and alcohol or even stimulants such as cocaine.

The preferred opiate of choice for euphoria was heroin by many, but there was a significant portion of people who would take oxycodone and hydrocodone (the easily available ones) over other opiates such as heroin. Morphine was not well liked. The "hard" ones like fetynol had a few likers, but many didn't care for them that much.

Opiates are some of the easiest drugs to use because they provide euphoria and for some incredible mental clarity, and still allow full functionality. There really is no hangover or comedown. However breaking an opiate addiction is incredibly hard. One user reported it was a full year before he could finally kick the excessive depression and inability to sleep after a heavy suboxone addiction.
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Old 02-04-2015, 06:58 AM
 
Location: On the "Left Coast", somewhere in "the Land of Fruits & Nuts"
8,367 posts, read 8,561,515 times
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Just judging from the 'popularity' of softer opiates, like hydrocodone and oxycodone, then by the 'gateway' logic we should be overrun with heroin addicts by now… which obviously isn't the case.

For example, my late brother in Florida (which has the highest use of prescription opiates in the country), had previously used cocaine for many years. But towards the end while struggling with severe arthritis, COPD, depression and other issues, he was pretty clearly addicted to the "softer opiates" to the exclusion of all others. And apparently they weren't that hard to obtain either.

Prescription Opioid Abusers Prefer to Get High on Oxycodone and Hydrocodone
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Old 02-04-2015, 08:54 AM
 
16,553 posts, read 11,464,890 times
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Most people who are addicted to opiates move to heroin because it is cheaper.
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Old 02-04-2015, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Denver
3,179 posts, read 2,620,552 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mateo45 View Post
Just judging from the 'popularity' of softer opiates, like hydrocodone and oxycodone, then by the 'gateway' logic we should be overrun with heroin addicts by now… which obviously isn't the case.

For example, my late brother in Florida (which has the highest use of prescription opiates in the country), had previously used cocaine for many years. But towards the end while struggling with severe arthritis, COPD, depression and other issues, he was pretty clearly addicted to the "softer opiates" to the exclusion of all others. And apparently they weren't that hard to obtain either.

Prescription Opioid Abusers Prefer to Get High on Oxycodone and Hydrocodone
Well, we do have significantly more heroin addicts now than we used to. Although I would judge that a lot of the oxy and hydro users just move up and up the tolerance ladder. So I guess they'd be a gateway drug to themselves...

Interesting article. Do you think the addition of acetaminophen to hydrocodone is justified? I don't, because it's an obvious health risk to the uninformed, who will most likely try hydrocodone first, and the desparate addicts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SourD View Post
Most people who are addicted to opiates move to heroin because it is cheaper.
It's cheaper but I wouldn't doubt that a significant portion of now heroin users would prefer heroin over the previous oxy or hydro that they were using.
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Old 02-04-2015, 09:47 AM
 
Location: St Paul
7,493 posts, read 3,503,969 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SourD View Post
Most people who are addicted to opiates move to heroin because it is cheaper.
That's right, and easier to get too. I've read of many stories where teenagers start using Oxy that they can steal from medicine cabinets or buy illegally. Once they get hooked, they don't have the money or prescription, a $20 bag of heroin will do the trick and so it begins.
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Old 02-04-2015, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Denver
3,179 posts, read 2,620,552 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mason3000 View Post
That's right, and easier to get too. I've read of many stories where teenagers start using Oxy that they can steal from medicine cabinets or buy illegally. Once they get hooked, they don't have the money or prescription, a $20 bag of heroin will do the trick and so it begins.
Hence gateway?
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Old 02-04-2015, 09:54 AM
 
3,792 posts, read 1,882,686 times
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No they are the end of the line drugs.
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Old 02-04-2015, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Illinois Delta
5,763 posts, read 4,341,479 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mason3000 View Post
That's right, and easier to get too. I've read of many stories where teenagers start using Oxy that they can steal from medicine cabinets or buy illegally. Once they get hooked, they don't have the money or prescription, a $20 bag of heroin will do the trick and so it begins.


According to most of the sources I could find, pharmaceutical drug addiction begins with alcohol, tobacco and yes, marijuana. However, alcohol is predominant as it's cheap and readily available.

Yale study: Alcohol’s gateway effect much larger than marijuana’s
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Old 02-04-2015, 09:58 AM
 
Location: The analog world
17,087 posts, read 9,800,340 times
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Opiates and opioids are extremely addictive, and they are prone to abuse and overdose. I also believe that some healthcare providers fail to advise patients about the dangers. The drugs you mentioned are not a kinder, gentler method of pain relief, and they must be treated with kid gloves. Too few people understand that.

Last edited by randomparent; 02-04-2015 at 10:06 AM..
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Old 02-04-2015, 10:05 AM
 
2,778 posts, read 1,420,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Evenstar51 View Post
According to most of the sources I could find, pharmaceutical drug addiction begins with alcohol, tobacco and yes, marijuana. However, alcohol is predominant as it's cheap and readily available.

Yale study: Alcohol’s gateway effect much larger than marijuana’s
This is one of the least surprising things I have ever heard.
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