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View Poll Results: Vote for somebody who doesn't have a degree?
Yes 153 72.51%
No 58 27.49%
Voters: 211. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-15-2015, 01:04 PM
 
1,825 posts, read 1,211,179 times
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It would depend on the person. With that said if this is a question of would I vote for Scott Walker the answer is no.

 
Old 02-15-2015, 01:09 PM
 
24,503 posts, read 35,420,732 times
Reputation: 12827
While not the only criteria, I would require someone I vote for to have some sort of Academic degree (as opposed to a professional degree) or have proven to have attained the same experience informally. With an undergraduate academic degree (from a decent school), you've proven your ability to submit papers, go through the peer-review process, and present new ideas at conferences and among peers. You've proven your ability to do research and provide sound arguments. You've proven your ability to learn (which is essentially all that an undergraduate degree does).

This doesn't mean that someone without a degree does not have these skills. But it's the de facto way to obtain these skills and they are incredibly important as a decision maker.
 
Old 02-15-2015, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Billings, MT
9,535 posts, read 7,829,050 times
Reputation: 13276
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
While not the only criteria, I would require someone I vote for to have some sort of Academic degree (as opposed to a professional degree) or have proven to have attained the same experience informally. With an undergraduate academic degree (from a decent school), you've proven your ability to submit papers, go through the peer-review process, and present new ideas at conferences and among peers. You've proven your ability to do research and provide sound arguments. You've proven your ability to learn (which is essentially all that an undergraduate degree does).

This doesn't mean that someone without a degree does not have these skills. But it's the de facto way to obtain these skills and they are incredibly important as a decision maker.
I simply can not agree with that.
I have known several people in my life who achieved a great deal of success in their chosen fields without any kind of degree. In fact, a few didn't even complete the eighth grade. Some were functionally illiterate. All were well endowed with basic common sense, and were excellent decision makers.
I have known entirely too many people who held degrees (Bachelor and above) who were pretty much useless.
Generally speaking, all generalizations can be proven true, including the next one.
Generally speaking, all generalizations can be proven false, including the previous one.
 
Old 02-15-2015, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,492 posts, read 51,354,718 times
Reputation: 24612
There are lots of people out there I would never vote for regardless of their education certification.
 
Old 02-15-2015, 01:28 PM
 
24,503 posts, read 35,420,732 times
Reputation: 12827
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redraven View Post
I simply can not agree with that.
I have known several people in my life who achieved a great deal of success in their chosen fields without any kind of degree. In fact, a few didn't even complete the eighth grade. Some were functionally illiterate. All were well endowed with basic common sense, and were excellent decision makers.
I have known entirely too many people who held degrees (Bachelor and above) who were pretty much useless.
Generally speaking, all generalizations can be proven true, including the next one.
Generally speaking, all generalizations can be proven false, including the previous one.
It seems that you may have failed to understand my post. I never said that a college degree was required to have these skills. In fact, I said "This doesn't mean that someone without a degree does not have these skills."

I'm sorry, but you cannot be "functionally illiterate" and be the president.

Majority of Americans that hold college degrees don't have college educations to go along with them. The vast majority go to diploma-mill-istic state schools that are pushing enrollments in the 10,000s with diluted educations (Penn State, Arizona State, etc). I made sure to point out that I was referring to those who got a good education from a decent school.
 
Old 02-15-2015, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Fredericksburg, Va
5,189 posts, read 13,347,698 times
Reputation: 7364
College doesn't make you "smart", or give you common sense.
 
Old 02-15-2015, 03:10 PM
 
14,193 posts, read 6,103,266 times
Reputation: 8847
Quote:
Originally Posted by wehotex View Post
Most jobs have a minimum education requirement. Why should this job be any different?
It's not a requirement according to the laws of this country.
 
Old 02-15-2015, 03:19 PM
 
Location: NE Ohio
30,193 posts, read 16,617,917 times
Reputation: 8850
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
While not the only criteria, I would require someone I vote for to have some sort of Academic degree (as opposed to a professional degree) or have proven to have attained the same experience informally. With an undergraduate academic degree (from a decent school), you've proven your ability to submit papers, go through the peer-review process, and present new ideas at conferences and among peers. You've proven your ability to do research and provide sound arguments. You've proven your ability to learn (which is essentially all that an undergraduate degree does).

This doesn't mean that someone without a degree does not have these skills. But it's the de facto way to obtain these skills and they are incredibly important as a decision maker.
So, how did Ronald Reagan measure up by that standard? He didn't finish college, yet became one of our greatest Presidents (best President in my lifetime).

You see your flawed standard? And what about Obama? He supposedly went to Harvard (but we have not been allowed to know how well he did or didn't do). And he is probably going to be remembered as the worst President in U.S. history.

And as far as writing goes, a President has everything written for him. He doesn't even write his own speeches.

Obama is a lousy speaker, if he goes off "script." He cannot speak extemporaneously.
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