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View Poll Results: walmart good bad or over
EVIL WALLYWORD 29 38.16%
GOOD WALLYWORLD 28 36.84%
I just go elsewhere 19 25.00%
Voters: 76. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-15-2006, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
14,506 posts, read 23,238,392 times
Reputation: 8833

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Quote:
Originally Posted by slkate View Post
Sure, that's great if you want to live with your head in the sand and completely ignore Wal-Mart's flagrant abuse of its employees and the communities it violates. My father-in-law is 72 years old and just underwent quadruple bypass surgery two days ago. His manager at Wal-Mart is threatening to fire him and thinks he has the right to do so because the store is in a right-to-work state. Fortunately, my husband and I are familiar with FMLA protection and are doing everything possible to ensure that his job will be protected while he recovers.

I'm tired of hearing the overtly simplistic, ignorant argument that people don't like Wal-Mart because it was founded by a Christian and isn't "liberal" enough. I don't think Jesus would make a sick man and his wheelchair-bound wife lose income and insurance benefits. The only thing "Christian" about Wal-Mart is their shameless support of Religious Right policies that undermine state's rights, have no regard for the middle class, and ensure that large corporations run roughshod over this nation and the lives of its citizens. Quit using Jesus as an excuse for this decidedly immoral behavior. It's insulting to real Christians.

Very well said. Since when did Jesus advocate fascism?
People who only see the black and white issue are the ones who will ultimately pay the price- they have no money, and support Bush's "crackdown"" on American minimum wage workers No wonder this country is in such a mess.
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Old 12-15-2006, 04:12 PM
 
Location: PHILIPINES/ USA
17 posts, read 108,280 times
Reputation: 86
well if most people are dont like to shop in wal-mart then why i seen a lot of people go there and shop. and the wal-mart seems has continue of it successful and still growing and growing...
i dont hate wal-mart nor like. i always go to shop in publix or in costco thier product is alot better in quality.
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Old 12-15-2006, 05:02 PM
 
Location: SF, CA
431 posts, read 294,076 times
Reputation: 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark6052 View Post
i dont think the founder of wal-mart would recognize the company he left behind, GOD rest his soul. i think the fanatics are in charge now. funny how people will justify buying there even knowing it hurts our economy and screws its employees. i think W-M should sell american made products, yes they would cost more but they would be of higher quality and last alot longer.

Do you drive an American made vehicle? Do you think they are better quality and last longer?
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Old 12-15-2006, 05:27 PM
 
Location: SF, CA
431 posts, read 294,076 times
Reputation: 198
Default Poll results

Despite all the negative posts about Wal-Mart and how evil it is, the poll shows "Good Wallyworld" in the lead.

I shop at Wal-Mart on a regular basis for sundries, canned goods, bottled water, soft drinks, cleaning products, personal care items, etc. I don't buy clothes there. The quality isn't there and I prefer Ralph Lauren and Calvin Klein for my business clothes.

People make a choice to apply at Wal-Mart. They make a choice to accept a job if offered. They COULD have made a choice to further their education and possibly not having to take a lower paying job (for some employees, not all.) I think it's great that Wal-Mart hires seniors who still want to work and students who want gas/spending money (sure beats them roaming the streets like many youth) and a lot of moms enjoy working a few hours a day while the kids are in school. Sure it has it's problems, but doesn't every MAMMOTH business? Yes. Look at Ford and GM....
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Old 12-15-2006, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
29,636 posts, read 65,791,564 times
Reputation: 15133
Unhappy Big-Box Evils: Part I

Quote:
Originally Posted by pslOldTimer View Post
The next week, I found the exact same model in a Walmart for $34.88.
Now, if you had that knowledge ahead of time, where would you buy it?
Neither. I'd pay an extra $15 to head to a mom-and-pop appliance store near me that we've faithfully done our business with for the past two decades. Why, may you ask? Well, as an employee of a big-box store (Lowe's) and the brother of an ex-Wal-Mart employee, I've now had two personal experiences to relate to on how poorly big-box retailers, in general, treat their employees. Now, there are a few exceptions (I hear Wegman's Foods gets very high marks from their employees), but overall, the big-box retail environment is littered with avarice; many managers are given bonuses based upon how profitable they make their stores look. They have two options to secure these bonuses:
1.) Increase revenues
2.) Reduce expenses

My Lowe's store has done both, regardless of the mental anguish these actions inflict upon employees. For example, last week one of our head cashiers made the page "Attention all Lowe's employees and customers: The time is now 10 PM and our Wilkes-Barre Lowe's store is now closed. Please bring your final purchases up to register 14 at this time. We'll be open at 6 AM tomorrow morning for your shopping convenience. Thank you for shopping at Lowe's; Let's Build Something Together." (Or something very similar to that generic page I hear every evening). After she did this, a manager reprimanded her for making the closing page, saying "we're $5,000 below budget for today and those doors are staying open." Sure, we'll gain an additional sale or two from having the doors left unlocked until 10:30 PM instead of 10:00 PM on a Wednesday night, but at what cost? The morale of your employees slips into decline, as they think management cares more about their bonuses than their employees (which is true and has created mass resentment throughout the store), and the cost to keep employees there must surely outweigh any marginal benefits gained from an extra two or three sales, I'd imagine. This happened again on another night. As the loader (the guy responsible for pushing carts in and helping to load purchases into customers' vehicles), I noticed it was already 10:14 PM and a manager hadn't yet locked the front doors, so I took it upon myself to do so, assuming that they had simply forgotten to do so. When they found out about it, one went and unlocked the door again.
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Old 12-15-2006, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
29,636 posts, read 65,791,564 times
Reputation: 15133
Default Part II

On the other end, the "reducing expenses" side of things, we have problems in our store with intentional understaffing. Some department employees are already alone at times and asked to cover an additional department on top of that, even on weekends! I can recall a woman from flooring who was visibly-distraught from the stress of being yelled at repeatedly by customers (Scrantonians are apparently quite hostile people) as she struggled to cover flooring, kitchens, AND appliances! I felt so very badly for her, but I have no knowledge of any of those departments, so I figured it would be better to avoid the situation instead of getting involved in the mess.

As a loader, I've watched in shock as three loaders quit within a two-month span recently. Now, on weekends, I'm frequently working alone outside, overstressed with moral dillemas---Do I help the "regular" contractor at the lumber exit load 20 sheets of drywall into his pick-up truck, the Back Mountain socialite in stelletos who just emerged from the main entrance of the store with a "heavy" light fixture, or the elderly couple who I see struggling to push a flatbed full of 20 bags of peat moss out of the garden center exit? Do I try to push in a row of carts to meet the demand, or just give up and assume that people in this area are intelligent enough to grab one from the parking lot if none are available inside? Do I take returns back to departments or allow them to pile up, becoming a potential liability? Do I hop onto a register for a "Code 3" or risk getting dirty glares from people as I walk by them as if they're automatically "entitled" to have me open up just so they can get home in time to watch Oprah? (They don't give out dirty glares when in line at the bank or the DMV, do they? Why then are we so magically "different?") Do I empty the trash cans as they're nearing capacity? Do I keep an eye on potential shoplifters? Do I help the throngs of people who stop me inside the store en route to helping someone else to ask me how to rewire their homes? If you were in my situation with all of these variable flying at you all at once, what would you do? Due to this insane stress put on my body, I've asked the manager if we can hire another loader, just for Saturdays, so that the store's budget wouldn't be "dented" more than like $70 per week on account of this new hire (even though the three fresh vacancies created from the three who recently quit should have left MORE than enough room in the budget). Apparently, it did not. I was told there was "no room on the payroll", and "there's 174 loaders on our payroll right now; we don't need any more." Well, what manager would like to explain to me why I'm seeing customers leaving irate left and right due to a "lack of service" if there's 174 other people available to tend to their concerns?

Wal-Mart. Lowe's. They're all the same. As long as managers are given the "incentive" to screw their employees over in any way they can with the promise of a hefty annual bonus for doing so, then you'll continue to have distressed employees (I'm now depressed and sick for the third time in two months; I suspect this major stress on my body has a lot to do with it), high turnover rates (leading to inexperienced staff), and irate customers (they still have the mindset that this is the day of "big mom-and-pops", and they flip out when they have to wait more than two minutes for the one overburdened employee to find time to tend to THEM amid a sea of people, as if they're somehow more important than those who have already been waiting longer). As for me, I REFUSE to support businesses that treat their employees in this manner. If it means paying more to shop at small, family-friendly businesses, then so be it. Don't any of you Wal-Mart and Lowe's shop-a-holics ever feel like cattle as you struggle your way through these stores? Don't you want to patronize a place that APPRECIATES you choosing THEM to spend your hard-earned dollars at? I guess "saving a few bucks in the short-run" means much more to many of you people. It's sad, really. Will we ever see the return of traditional "Main Streets" in America, or at least in PA, where there are none?
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Old 12-15-2006, 11:40 PM
 
Location: 78218
1,151 posts, read 3,064,810 times
Reputation: 642
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lannie View Post
Despite all the negative posts about Wal-Mart and how evil it is, the poll shows "Good Wallyworld" in the lead.

I shop at Wal-Mart on a regular basis for sundries, canned goods, bottled water, soft drinks, cleaning products, personal care items, etc. I don't buy clothes there. The quality isn't there and I prefer Ralph Lauren and Calvin Klein for my business clothes.

People make a choice to apply at Wal-Mart. They make a choice to accept a job if offered. They COULD have made a choice to further their education and possibly not having to take a lower paying job (for some employees, not all.) I think it's great that Wal-Mart hires seniors who still want to work and students who want gas/spending money (sure beats them roaming the streets like many youth) and a lot of moms enjoy working a few hours a day while the kids are in school. Sure it has it's problems, but doesn't every MAMMOTH business? Yes. Look at Ford and GM....
Amen! My blinded hatred towards Wallyworld, made me forgot GM and FORD.
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Old 12-16-2006, 03:38 AM
 
Location: Thumb of Michigan
4,489 posts, read 6,669,800 times
Reputation: 2522
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lannie View Post
Do you drive an American made vehicle? Do you think they are better quality and last longer?
Technically, Toyota is made by Americans, so are many other vehicles that aren't "american" per se!

BTW: There is no such thing as an "All-American Vehicle"...a plastic piece made in Canada, motor assembled in Mexico, suspension parts made in Germany, computer parts made in China.(etc)

Last edited by Blue Grass Fever; 12-16-2006 at 04:35 AM..
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Old 12-16-2006, 11:35 AM
 
Location: SF, CA
431 posts, read 294,076 times
Reputation: 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Grass Fever View Post
Technically, Toyota is made by Americans, so are many other vehicles that aren't "american" per se!

BTW: There is no such thing as an "All-American Vehicle"...a plastic piece made in Canada, motor assembled in Mexico, suspension parts made in Germany, computer parts made in China.(etc)

Maybe I asked my question wrong - Ford and General Motors: Their plants are right here in America and their unionized workers are paid on average $40-45/hr plus benefits. Do you buy a Ford or GM product to support American labor? A motor may be built in Mexico (Mexicans WORK in Mexico? I thought they all came here??) but it's sent here to be assembled by American workers; same with plastic from Canada. Do you buy from motor companies here in the United States?
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Old 12-16-2006, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Thumb of Michigan
4,489 posts, read 6,669,800 times
Reputation: 2522
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lannie View Post
Maybe I asked my question wrong - Ford and General Motors: Their plants are right here in America and their unionized workers are paid on average $40-45/hr plus benefits. Do you buy a Ford or GM product to support American labor? A motor may be built in Mexico (Mexicans WORK in Mexico? I thought they all came here??) but it's sent here to be assembled by American workers; same with plastic from Canada. Do you buy from motor companies here in the United States?
Yes i do...DaimerChrysler! It supports American labor...(or U.A.W.-if that's what you mean?)
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