U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-12-2015, 11:02 AM
 
Location: NJ
16,812 posts, read 11,755,818 times
Reputation: 10810

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by KRAMERCAT View Post
Recovery... what recovery?

'the average age of a minimum wage worker in this country is 36.

only 44 percent of all U.S. adults are employed for 30 or more hours each week

more than 100 million working age Americansare not employed.

millions of good paying American jobs have been shipped overseas'

The Average Age of a Minimum Wage Worker in America Is 36 | The Daily Sheeple
Pew research
"People at or below the federal minimum are:"
  • Disproportionately young: 50.4% are ages 16 to 24; 24% are teenagers (ages 16 to 19).
  • Mostly (77%) white; nearly half are white women.
  • Largely part-time workers (64% of the total).""
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-12-2015, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Barrington
45,619 posts, read 33,883,136 times
Reputation: 15185
In 2004, Congress declared a tax holiday for multinationals to encourage them to bring their profits back to the U.S. Corporations were prohibited from using the windfall to increase executive compensation. It was believed at the time that corporations would use their windfalls to invest in R&D and hire more U.S. Workers. The reality is that the 15 corporations who repatriated the most cash, laid off more than 20,000 people and reduced R&D spending.

There has been no shortage of bipartisan bills introduced to declare another tax holiday with similar restrictions on executive compensation. All have gone nowhere, fast.

Corporations do not hire more people because they have extra cash. There has to be a business need to hire more people. It increasingly makes more sense to use tech to increase productivity and reduce costs. It makes more sense to outsource certain job functions to lower cost markets than to hire in the U.S. These multinational corporations have a long history of providing their U.S. employees with solid benefits, including substantially subsidized healthcare. The ACA did not make a difference for large scale corporate employers with the most offshore profits.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-12-2015, 11:11 AM
 
2,778 posts, read 1,420,920 times
Reputation: 2418
Quote:
Originally Posted by PedroMartinez View Post
Is it a shock that jobs which have a very low and/or easily learned skill pay very little?

This may be a shocker for some people, but the more common something is, the less value it has.

The value of fresh water is much less in Minnesota than the Sahara (not Sarah, lol).

The value of ice is much less in Greenland than in Mexico.

If you want to have more value, which translates into better pay and better job security, you must gain skills that are less common or take longer to learn.

Yes, I know, this SHOULD be common sense.
You're assuming that low paying work is merely a fact of life that should never be challenged, simply because it's the way the market works.

You're also assuming not only that everyone is financially, physically and intellectually capable of developing skills that are less common or take longer to learn, but that developing those skills isn't simply going to destroy demand in those sectors as well, effectively pushing the surplus back to the bottom.

There is plenty of demand in the low-paying fields... otherwise these jobs wouldn't be the most popular. The problem is that the supply of job candidates is even higher... because of unskilled workers but also because of a surplus of skilled workers.

The problem is bigger than what your patronizing and unnecessary lesson in kindergarten economics would suggest.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-12-2015, 11:13 AM
 
2,778 posts, read 1,420,920 times
Reputation: 2418
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kracer View Post
Pew research
"People at or below the federal minimum are:"
  • Disproportionately young: 50.4% are ages 16 to 24; 24% are teenagers (ages 16 to 19).
  • Mostly (77%) white; nearly half are white women.
  • Largely part-time workers (64% of the total).""
You left out people above the minimum, but still barely scraping by.

And considering how low the minimum is, that's not exactly a ringing endorsement of the widespread prosperity narrative.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-12-2015, 11:27 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
2,161 posts, read 2,064,974 times
Reputation: 2588
Quote:
Originally Posted by greywar View Post
Corporate taxes are actually amazing low...despite which more jobs haven't occur ed. So thats pretty blatantly wrong.
Not really.

The top statutory tax rate in the U.S. is the highest in the world:



Some will claim that various credits, carve outs etc. reduce that to the point where the U.S. doesn't stand out as much. Well, here's a link to a study that shows that the average effective tax rate in the U.S. is 27%, compared to 20% in the rest of the world.

There is little doubt that our corporate tax structure is among the highest in the world. You can show correlation between countries that have lower corporate tax structures and higher rates of growth in those countries.

The policies of the left create significant impediments to growth in the country.

Dave
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-12-2015, 11:31 AM
 
Location: USA
6,220 posts, read 5,330,545 times
Reputation: 10632
In my area it's mostly the mom and pop joints that pay minimum wage. Fast food and retail jobs generally start out at $9-10 per hour. There are advancement opportunities if one wants to make more.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-12-2015, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Unperson Everyman Land
30,392 posts, read 20,039,792 times
Reputation: 8321
Quote:
Originally Posted by burdell View Post
I guess all other things are far from the same considering Honda, Toyota, Nissan, Hyundai, Mercedes Benz, BMW, VW, et al seem quite content with their manufacturing plants in the US.

Or, perhaps the reality is the US is a pretty good place to do business despite the whining of corporate shills who despite having a sandwich in each hand continue to cry ' I'm hungry '.

Meanwhile, incomes have been falling since about 2002.

Out competing third world peasants with our falling wages doesn`t feel like winning to me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-12-2015, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Chattanooga, TN
2,791 posts, read 3,878,939 times
Reputation: 4296
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Eagle View Post
I think one of the big problems is going to school is expensive. I went to a community college took one of the most basic courses and it cost me $500. That is a lot of money for someone especially if they have other things they have to pay for. We need to make education more affordable.
This is a key problem with the modern workforce... people erroneously assume "education" means "school" or "college".

Yes, there are schools for welding (you can't ship a building overseas and weld it in China), or truck driving, or pipe fitting. But there are also apprenticeship programs. The only thing most of these programs require is worth ethic, trainability, and a desire to learn. Some require passing basic tests on mathematics and English (learning basic trigonometry is necessary for laying out materials for welding, etc.), but you can learn those things at your local library. You know, the building full of free books.

Apprenticeship - U.S. Department of Labor
TVA: Lineman Apprentice Program
United Association
Pipefitters Apprenticeship
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-12-2015, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Barrington
45,619 posts, read 33,883,136 times
Reputation: 15185
Quote:
Originally Posted by jojajn View Post
Hard to move up when wages stink for almost all middle class jobs now.


Wages stink at America's most common jobs - Apr. 1, 2013
Walmart overtook IBM as the largest U.S. employer back in the 80's. McDonalds, then Yum Brands ( Taco Bell) pushed IBM to 4th place. This all happened almost 30 years ago.

Tech eliminated millions of middle class jobs in banking as Direct Deposits, ATMs, automated check clearance and electronic banking matured.

15% of US manufacturing jobs were permanently eliminated by tech, between 2000-2010.

Thus far this year, McDonands has shuttered 700 underperforming corporate- owned restaurants in Japan, China and the U.S. The cycle of never ending domestic and global expansion for McDonalds appears to have matured.

Tech became too costly so jobs were outsourced. Why should an employer pay $250,000 for a job function that can be performed by capable people in India for $50,000? The guy making $50,000 in India now has more money available for discretionary spending, creating an emerging economy.

Employment during the 2000's was a blip in time enabled by the housing bubble. Contrary to popular opinion, the housing bubble was global. Temporary inflation of housing values in New Zealand and South Africa was substantially more profound than in the U.S. Most markets in the U.S. and the rest of the world have not recovered. The uber wealthy have been investing in select US housing markets and do so as a safe haven.

Politicians blame because they don't have any concrete plans. Expecting government, any government, to make it all better is a fool's paradise.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-12-2015, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Barrington
45,619 posts, read 33,883,136 times
Reputation: 15185
Quote:
Originally Posted by jwkilgore View Post
This is a key problem with the modern workforce... people erroneously assume "education" means "school" or "college".

Yes, there are schools for welding (you can't ship a building overseas and weld it in China), or truck driving, or pipe fitting. But there are also apprenticeship programs. The only thing most of these programs require is worth ethic, trainability, and a desire to learn. Some require passing basic tests on mathematics and English (learning basic trigonometry is necessary for laying out materials for welding, etc.), but you can learn those things at your local library. You know, the building full of free books.

Apprenticeship - U.S. Department of Labor
TVA: Lineman Apprentice Program
United Association
Pipefitters Apprenticeship
Many find it easier to light up a joint to take the edge off ( of what, I do not know) while blaming government for what ails them, instead of taking responsibility for themselves and their own outcomes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:23 AM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top