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Old 05-17-2015, 10:35 AM
 
5,097 posts, read 2,487,494 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinguina View Post
And it would have been entirely appropriate for Michelle Obama or any other commencement speaker to give a speech at an all-women's college acknowledging struggles that pertain (although not uniquely) to all women. It's actually quite often the case. But we don't hear about it on CD because it's not about black people.

Remember - if you'd bothered to read the prior posts, that the the point of Mrs. Obama bringing up this subject was to say that none of the slights or hardships they faced is an excuse to give up, get angry, or lash out, but to become productive members of society.
Obviously the fact that students work hard to achieve their goals is not an excuse to give up, but that point is also not relevant at a convocation speech. Convocations are about the future hopes and dreams, not about being mistakenly perceived as "the help".
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Old 05-17-2015, 10:39 AM
 
86 posts, read 65,382 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lieneke View Post
Obviously the fact that students work hard to achieve their goals is not an excuse to give up, but that point is also not relevant at a convocation speech. Convocations are about the future hopes and dreams, not about being mistakenly perceived as "the help".
What about the analogy that was brought up before - a speaker at an all-female college acknowledging the struggles that pertain to women and encouraging them to overcome it and succeed?

Edit: Just saw your last post. I would respectfully disagree with that. I think convocation/commencement speeches should "know" the audience and the collective experiences of that audience. Acknowledging their obstacles in the past and future helps the speaker connect with them and validates their experience. This gives them hope - to know that someone that is considered successful and intelligent gets what they're going through. I think that kind of message is inspirational.
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Old 05-17-2015, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Suffolk, Va
3,029 posts, read 2,116,862 times
Reputation: 1961
Quote:
Originally Posted by WaldoKitty View Post
A pointless fallacious generalization. Let's get to the nitty gritty.....

Are you saying, that Michelle Obama, the First Lady of the United States of America, IS NOT proud of a country that elected her husband not once, but twice to office in this a majority White country?

If YES, then I have two other questions for you.

  1. In what majority White country on the planet Earth aside from the USA would it be possible for her to hold a similar position?
  2. Are you really saying that Michelle Obama is upset because she isn't accepted a White person would be by Whites?
lol. this post does not matter, because this entire topic doesn't matter. the fact is in America she has the freedom to never be proud of this country. this attack is about applying otherness to the Obamas and nothing more. where could she be the first lady or equivalent? pretty much anywhere in western europe. I won't go as far to day that these countries are ready for black presidents/prime ministers, but I have no doubt that a white man with a black wife could get elected.

where do you get that I am saying she is upset thst she is not accepted by white society? for me, I don't care if white society ever accepts me, I just want equality and respect. but that's me.
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Old 05-17-2015, 10:46 AM
 
5,097 posts, read 2,487,494 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinguina View Post
What about the analogy that was brought up before - a speaker at an all-female college acknowledging the struggles that pertain to women and encouraging them to overcome it and succeed?
A speaker at an all female convocation should think twice about discussing being mistaken for the help. Chances are that speaker would be boo-ed off the stage for talking irrelevant nonsense.

Convocations are different than other speeches in that they are meant to be about the future, not the past, they are intended to be positive, not negative, they are a send off to great things to come, not nonsense about perceived victimization.
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Old 05-17-2015, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Suffolk, Va
3,029 posts, read 2,116,862 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lieneke View Post
I listened to what she had to say as a non-black female, and everything she said is true of non-black females. We cross the street because we see something ahead that may not be a safe situation, we are mistaken for the help, no one sees the sacrifices we made to achieve our accomplishments, blah blah blah.

Do black people really think that their life experiences are unique, and a direct result of the colour of their skin? If so, I think there needs to be some serious psychological help for those egocentric people, and given that it appears to be systemic problem, that help needs to start in kindergarten.
oh yeah, it's all in our heads. there is no statistical evidence to back up what we're saying. your anecdotal evidence is all we need.
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Old 05-17-2015, 10:55 AM
 
86 posts, read 65,382 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lieneke View Post
A speaker at an all female convocation should think twice about discussing being mistaken for the help. Chances are that speaker would be boo-ed off the stage for talking irrelevant nonsense.

Convocations are different than other speeches in that they are meant to be about the future, not the past, they are intended to be positive, not negative, they are a send off to great things to come, not nonsense about perceived victimization.
That's because "being mistaken for the help" is something likely to happen to people of color, not women in general. Someone posted several pages back about Justice O'Connor's commencement speech regarding the obstacles put in her way as one of the female trailblazers in the legal world. Despite being a top law graduate, she could only find a job as a secretary, etc. Was that inappropriate, because it doesn't focus on the "future"? She most certainly was not booed offstage.
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Old 05-17-2015, 10:55 AM
 
11,758 posts, read 5,548,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lieneke View Post
If Michelle's remarks are intended to give people with black skin the understanding that people with black skin are treated differently than others, or that their life experiences are unique to their skin colour, then she is a foolish woman who is a "race baitor" (never heard that term before!).
By the time they are 22, all African-Americans know already that they are sometimes treated differently than similarly situated white people. I can't fathom how white people are able to dispute this in good faith? How do you even know? Did you wear a black face in public for a week, or something? lol

Mick
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Old 05-17-2015, 10:58 AM
 
5,097 posts, read 2,487,494 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinguina View Post
That's because "being mistaken for the help" is something likely to happen to people of color, not women in general. Someone posted several pages back about Justice O'Connor's commencement speech regarding the obstacles put in her way as one of the female trailblazers in the legal world. Was that inappropriate, because it doesn't focus on the "future"? She most certainly was not booed offstage.
Being mistaken for the help has happened to me so many times I can't count them anymore. That has absolutely nothing to do with skin colour. If black people think that they are asked for directions to the change room, or more serviettes, only because of the colour of their skin, then they need psychological help.
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Old 05-17-2015, 11:00 AM
 
5,097 posts, read 2,487,494 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MTQ3000 View Post
By the time they are 22, all African-Americans know already that they are sometimes treated differently than similarly situated white people. I can't fathom how white people are able to dispute this in good faith? How do you even know? Did you wear a black face in public for a week, or something? lol

Mick
By the time they are 22, all women know already that they are sometimes treated differently than similarly situated men (regardless of skin colour). I can't fathom how people are able to dispute this in good faith.

Is that a reason to have a chip on one's shoulder? Obviously not.
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Old 05-17-2015, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Hyrule
8,398 posts, read 9,891,547 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinguina View Post
And it would have been entirely appropriate for Michelle Obama or any other commencement speaker to give a speech at an all-women's college acknowledging struggles that pertain (although not uniquely) to all women. It's actually quite often the case. But we don't hear about it on CD because it's not about black people.

Remember - if you'd bothered to read the prior posts, that the the point of Mrs. Obama bringing up this subject was to say that none of the slights or hardships they faced is an excuse to give up, get angry, or lash out, but to become productive members of society.
I get it,, I know what she was going for but I don't think she did a good job at it. That's what this thread is about, did we like her speech. No, I thought she did a terrible job and I though she was off the mark.

She should apply her own advice. But,,,,it seems racism is the "new black" and I don't mean skin color.
I'm thinking black people don't realize this happens to all of us. It's not a black only party.
The Obamas: How We Deal with Our Own Racist Experiences - Ferguson, politics, Barack Obama, Michelle Obama : People.com

Everyone experiences prejudice. "Open your eyes man, the world is full of possibilities"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hPioJP39dW4

Nobody denies some people are stupid and treat people badly based on prejudice, but in this day and age it happens to everyone. It's not just a black thing, it's a human thing. Please, don't make it fashionable to be a victim.

Whites do it, blacks do it, hispanics do it, everyone makes fun of, stereotypes and avoids someone, based on something one can find offensive and hurtful. It's not just a black thing. I think she should have left out the "future" bashing bound to come from the white man. The rest of her speech was good.
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