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Old 08-21-2015, 05:25 AM
 
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During my time on the road this week, I happened to notice that most of the woman driving really nice SUVs (Lexus, Audi, Mercedes, etc) happened to be very attractive, at least from what I could tell.
On the other hand, there was a distinct difference in appearance in the woman driving minivans or similar cars.

With all the talk of white privilege, is there also a cultural bias towards very attractive people, particularly women?
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Old 08-21-2015, 07:09 AM
 
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Of course there is.

Talk about "white privilege" to toothless, homeless and dirt poor white people in Eastern Kentucky is a bit of an insult. The corporate elites who run the country couldnt give a rats a** about them and never have.
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Old 08-21-2015, 07:34 AM
 
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Originally Posted by PCALMike View Post
Of course there is.

Talk about "white privilege" to toothless, homeless and dirt poor white people in Eastern Kentucky is a bit of an insult. The corporate elites who run the country couldnt give a rats a** about them and never have.
You all just don't get it do you. Hint: There is white privileged in the CONTEXT of Appalachia.


Q: Who are the poor in Appalachia?

MS. GLASMEIER: Women, children, and the elderly. The percentage of children living in poverty in the Region goes from probably 14 up to 50 percent. So in some counties, every other child is living in a family that lives in poverty.

MR. BISCHAK: The poor are principally concentrated in the central region of Appalachia. And even though Appalachia has a smaller share of blacks than the nation as a whole, the Region's black population is two-and-a-half times more likely to be poor than the white population.

MS. GLASMEIER: White Appalachians have one experience, and black Appalachians have another. Some of the defining characteristics of poverty in the Region have to do with geography. I also think you have differences in length of time in poverty. In the central Appalachian core, you have generations of families that have lived in poverty, whereas in the south, I think you have people that have gone in and out of the labor market and in and out of being really poor.

MR. ELLER: The poor in Appalachia are often what I might call a "placed population," often tied to a specific geographic place. The larger society, especially in the late twentieth century, assumes that jobs are available anywhere in the country and that people are free to move wherever the jobs may be. That simply is not the case for many of the poor in Appalachia. They don't have the education to be mobile. In many cases they are tied because of a need to take care of a disabled or older relative or tied emotionally to their place. It means that we must design and direct programs that are much more place-oriented than nationally designed programs often are. We need to look at programs that reach people where they live.


Appalachian Regional Commission
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Old 08-21-2015, 07:39 AM
 
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Pretty people problems.
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Old 08-21-2015, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Inland Northwest
1,793 posts, read 1,148,005 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lenniel View Post
During my time on the road this week, I happened to notice that most of the woman driving really nice SUVs (Lexus, Audi, Mercedes, etc) happened to be very attractive, at least from what I could tell.
On the other hand, there was a distinct difference in appearance in the woman driving minivans or similar cars.

With all the talk of white privilege, is there also a cultural bias towards very attractive people, particularly women?
Um, pretty white women marry up. And drive nice SUV's. Have more time and disposable income for things like blond hair dye, fingernails, facials, and eyebrow tattos. Average women take what they can get marrying equally and thus drive minivans and drink McDonalds coffee.
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Old 08-21-2015, 07:47 AM
 
12,843 posts, read 4,651,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indentured Servant View Post
You all just don't get it do you. Hint: There is white privileged in the CONTEXT of Appalachia.


Q: Who are the poor in Appalachia?

MS. GLASMEIER: Women, children, and the elderly. The percentage of children living in poverty in the Region goes from probably 14 up to 50 percent. So in some counties, every other child is living in a family that lives in poverty.

MR. BISCHAK: The poor are principally concentrated in the central region of Appalachia. And even though Appalachia has a smaller share of blacks than the nation as a whole, the Region's black population is two-and-a-half times more likely to be poor than the white population.

MS. GLASMEIER: White Appalachians have one experience, and black Appalachians have another. Some of the defining characteristics of poverty in the Region have to do with geography. I also think you have differences in length of time in poverty. In the central Appalachian core, you have generations of families that have lived in poverty, whereas in the south, I think you have people that have gone in and out of the labor market and in and out of being really poor.

MR. ELLER: The poor in Appalachia are often what I might call a "placed population," often tied to a specific geographic place. The larger society, especially in the late twentieth century, assumes that jobs are available anywhere in the country and that people are free to move wherever the jobs may be. That simply is not the case for many of the poor in Appalachia. They don't have the education to be mobile. In many cases they are tied because of a need to take care of a disabled or older relative or tied emotionally to their place. It means that we must design and direct programs that are much more place-oriented than nationally designed programs often are. We need to look at programs that reach people where they live.


Appalachian Regional Commission
It's still ridiculous to talk about privilege to a toothless, homeless white person in Eastern Kentucky who is laughed at and ignored by the ruling classes. And Eastern Kentucky counties have like 99% white population. Martin county for example has 12600 people and only 4 black people. They are statistically irrelevant. Life expectancy of people in this region is lower than some of the poorest black communities in the country like the Mississppi delta.

Last edited by PCALMike; 08-21-2015 at 07:55 AM..
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Old 08-21-2015, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Inland Northwest
1,793 posts, read 1,148,005 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PCALMike View Post
It's still ridiculous to talk about privilege to a toothless, homeless white person in Eastern Kentucky who is laughed at and ignored by the ruling classes. And Eastern Kentucky counties have like 99% white population. Life expectancy of people in this region is lower than some of the poorest black communities in the country like the Mississppi delta.
It's of no use. You're talking to a brick wall. A black-black-blackety-black brick wall.

Any attempts at "discussing race" will be met with the same intellectually bland and tired arguements. His version of the "conversation about race" is nothing from than, yet another, sermon and monologue.
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Old 08-21-2015, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Fairfax, VA
3,829 posts, read 2,793,404 times
Reputation: 3680
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenniel View Post
During my time on the road this week, I happened to notice that most of the woman driving really nice SUVs (Lexus, Audi, Mercedes, etc) happened to be very attractive, at least from what I could tell.
On the other hand, there was a distinct difference in appearance in the woman driving minivans or similar cars.

With all the talk of white privilege, is there also a cultural bias towards very attractive people, particularly women?

Wealthy men do not choose ugly spouses.
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Old 08-21-2015, 07:53 AM
 
9,948 posts, read 6,890,314 times
Reputation: 4221
Quote:
Originally Posted by PCALMike View Post
It's still ridiculous to talk about privilege to a toothless, homeless white person in Eastern Kentucky who is laughed at and ignored by the ruling classes. And Eastern Kentucky counties have like 99% white population. Life expectancy of people in this region is lower than some of the poorest black communities in the country like the Mississppi delta.
White privilege is about CONTEXT. In the context of Appalachia its still generally true that whites have it better than blacks. In the context of Mississippi, its still true that whites have it better than blacks, notwithstanding the fact that blacks in Prince George county, Maryland have it better than whites in Appalachia. It's all about context.
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Old 08-21-2015, 07:53 AM
 
Location: St Louis, MO
4,677 posts, read 4,821,991 times
Reputation: 2971
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenniel View Post
During my time on the road this week, I happened to notice that most of the woman driving really nice SUVs (Lexus, Audi, Mercedes, etc) happened to be very attractive, at least from what I could tell.
On the other hand, there was a distinct difference in appearance in the woman driving minivans or similar cars.
Or maybe women driving luxury SUVs just have time to dress up, do their hair, and put on makeup, whereas the women driving minivans are sinking all their time into the kids that the minivan is used to cart around.
(Even if the women in luxury SUVs have kids, money can buy time by paying other people to assist with aspects of childcare. Plus the simple fact that money can buy appearance, in the form of professional beauty treatments, expensive hair care, and expensive clothes.)
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