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Old 07-30-2016, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
22,477 posts, read 10,408,804 times
Reputation: 20327

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Quote:
Originally Posted by InformedConsent View Post
The KKK were Dems.

Democrat Senator Byrd ring a bell?

And this...
Rise of the Ku Klux Klan . U.S. Grant: Warrior . WGBH American Experience | PBS
It's 2016, not the late 1800s or early 1900s.
Ring a bell?
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Old 07-30-2016, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
22,477 posts, read 10,408,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kirdik View Post
Reversed roles? What do you mean by that?
If you don't know the answer to that, then you belong discussing race in America.
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Old 07-30-2016, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
22,477 posts, read 10,408,804 times
Reputation: 20327
Quote:
Originally Posted by PullMyFinger View Post
By today's standards. I have news for you. There were slave owners that were really good people. The practice was abhorrent much like many practices of those days....like open season on Indians.

Look at how murdering liberals defend abortion and I guarantee you that practice will be considered abhorrent by future people. At least slaves got a chance to live, be baptized and go home to God after leading as good a life as possible. These murdering, soulless liberals don't even give babies that much humanity.
You can't own people and be "really good". PERIOD.
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Old 07-30-2016, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
22,477 posts, read 10,408,804 times
Reputation: 20327
Quote:
Originally Posted by Propulser View Post
I tried to help you, but as always you'd rather wallow in your Hate and Excuse Making. One day it will drown you, spirit, soul and....! Too bad.
Please keep talking down to Blacks. The Democrat Party needs people just like you to do that.
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Old 07-30-2016, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Miami, FL
8,088 posts, read 7,740,314 times
Reputation: 6650
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
You can't own people and be "really good". PERIOD.
Not today. But there was a time.... anyone who reads history knows this.

No apologizes for the past. If we lived then we would do what we needed to survive, then to prosper, then accept what we believed in as the order of things,etc. Much as we do now. Different world. But not so different at its roots.

I recall reading how the Spanish court held a debate on how to consider the New World native peoples. Illuminating the debates. A bit modern, a bit ancient, a bit not from the realm of our understanding. As would be expected in the mid 1500s. Slavery and other social constructs not so different.
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Old 07-30-2016, 02:11 PM
 
Location: *
8,096 posts, read 2,416,063 times
Reputation: 2215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loveshiscountry View Post
Who is saying it was unsuccessful? Unless you mean his personal movement.
What I'm trying to convey is, historically speaking, the slave rebellions were not enough to end race-based slavery in the United States of America:

"1663: First serious slave conspiracy in Colonial America
White servants and black slaves conspire to revolt in Gloucester County, VA, but are betrayed by a fellow servant.

1739: The Stono Rebellion
The deadliest revolt in Colonial America takes place in Stono, SC. Armed slaves start marching to Florida and towards freedom, but the insurrection is put down and at least 20 whites and more than 40 blacks are killed.

1791: Haiti slave revolt
Former slave Toussaint L'Ouverture leads a slave revolt in Haiti, West Indies. He is captured in 1802, but the revolt continues and Haitian independence is declared. Southerners are terrified by these events as they discourage the importation of slaves into the United States.

1800: Gabriel Prosser’s rebellion
In the spring of 1800, Prosser, a deeply religious man, begins plotting an invasion of Richmond, Virginia and an attack on its armory. By summer he has enlisted more than 1,000 slaves and collected an armory of weapons, organizing the first large-scale slave revolt in the U.S. On the day of the revolt, the bridges leading to Richmond are destroyed in a flood, and Prosser is betrayed. The state militia attacks, and Prosser and 35 of his men are hanged.

1811: Louisiana revolt
Louisiana slaves revolt in two parishes near New Orleans. The revolt is suppressed by U.S. troops.

1816: Fort Blount revolt
Three hundred slaves and about 20 Native American allies hold Fort Blount on Apalachicola Bay, Florida for several days before being attacked by U.S. troops.

1822: Denmark Vesey’s revolt
A freed man, Vesey had won a lottery and purchased his emancipation in 1800. He is working as a carpenter in Charleston, South Carolina when he starts to plan a massive slave rebellion—one of the most elaborate plots in American history—involving thousands of slaves on surrounding plantations, organized into cells. They would start a major fire at night, and then kill the slave owners and their families. Vesey is betrayed and hanged, but the cell structure prevents officials from identifying other leaders.

1831: Nat Turner’s revolt
Nat Turner plans a slave revolt in Southampton County, Virginia, the only effective, sustained slave rebellion in U.S. history. Sixty whites are killed before Turner and his followers are captured and hanged.

1831–1862: The Underground Railroad
Approximately 75,000 slaves escape to the North and to freedom via the Underground Railroad, a system in which free African American and white "conductors," abolitionists and sympathizers help guide and shelter the escapees.

1838: Frederick Douglass escapes
Frederick Douglass escapes from slavery in Baltimore. He later publishes his autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Written by Himself, and becomes a leading abolitionist.

1839: The Amistad mutiny
Led by a West African named Cinque, slaves transported aboard the Spanish ship Amistad stage a mutiny, killing the entire crew except for the captain and first mate and demanding to be sailed back to Africa. Instead, the captain sails to New York. The rebels eventually win their freedom in a landmark Supreme Court case in which they are defended by former president John Quincy Adams.

1841: Creole revolt
Slaves revolt on the Creole, a slave trading ship sailing from Virginia to Louisiana. The rebels overpower the crew and successfully sail to the Bahamas, where they are granted asylum and freedom.

1849: Harriet Tubman escapes
Harriet Tubman escapes from slavery in Maryland. She becomes one of the best-known "conductors" on the Underground Railroad, returning to the South 19 times and helping more than 300 slaves escape to freedom.

1859: Harper’s Ferry Attack
Led by abolitionist John Brown, a group of slaves and white abolitionists stage an attack on Harper’s Ferry, Virginia. They capture the federal armory and arsenal before the insurrection is halted by local militia. Brown and the other captives are tried and executed. The raid hastens the advent of the Civil War, which starts two years later."

Independent Lens . NAT TURNER: A Troublesome Property . Slave Rebellions | PBS
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Old 07-30-2016, 02:13 PM
 
Location: *
8,096 posts, read 2,416,063 times
Reputation: 2215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loveshiscountry View Post
...The one percent don't give up easy.

The libertarian way would have been for the founders to not be hypocrites and not allow kidnapping in the first place.
Time travel?
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Old 07-30-2016, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Miami, FL
8,088 posts, read 7,740,314 times
Reputation: 6650
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiGeekGuest View Post
What I'm trying to convey is, historically speaking, the slave rebellions were not enough to end race-based slavery in the United States of America:

"1663: First serious slave conspiracy in Colonial America
White servants and black slaves conspire to revolt in Gloucester County, VA, but are betrayed by a fellow servant.

1739: The Stono Rebellion
The deadliest revolt in Colonial America takes place in Stono, SC. Armed slaves start marching to Florida and towards freedom, but the insurrection is put down and at least 20 whites and more than 40 blacks are killed.

1791: Haiti slave revolt
Former slave Toussaint L'Ouverture leads a slave revolt in Haiti, West Indies. He is captured in 1802, but the revolt continues and Haitian independence is declared. Southerners are terrified by these events as they discourage the importation of slaves into the United States.

1800: Gabriel Prosser’s rebellion
In the spring of 1800, Prosser, a deeply religious man, begins plotting an invasion of Richmond, Virginia and an attack on its armory. By summer he has enlisted more than 1,000 slaves and collected an armory of weapons, organizing the first large-scale slave revolt in the U.S. On the day of the revolt, the bridges leading to Richmond are destroyed in a flood, and Prosser is betrayed. The state militia attacks, and Prosser and 35 of his men are hanged.

1811: Louisiana revolt
Louisiana slaves revolt in two parishes near New Orleans. The revolt is suppressed by U.S. troops.

1816: Fort Blount revolt
Three hundred slaves and about 20 Native American allies hold Fort Blount on Apalachicola Bay, Florida for several days before being attacked by U.S. troops.

1822: Denmark Vesey’s revolt
A freed man, Vesey had won a lottery and purchased his emancipation in 1800. He is working as a carpenter in Charleston, South Carolina when he starts to plan a massive slave rebellion—one of the most elaborate plots in American history—involving thousands of slaves on surrounding plantations, organized into cells. They would start a major fire at night, and then kill the slave owners and their families. Vesey is betrayed and hanged, but the cell structure prevents officials from identifying other leaders.

1831: Nat Turner’s revolt
Nat Turner plans a slave revolt in Southampton County, Virginia, the only effective, sustained slave rebellion in U.S. history. Sixty whites are killed before Turner and his followers are captured and hanged.

1831–1862: The Underground Railroad
Approximately 75,000 slaves escape to the North and to freedom via the Underground Railroad, a system in which free African American and white "conductors," abolitionists and sympathizers help guide and shelter the escapees.

1838: Frederick Douglass escapes
Frederick Douglass escapes from slavery in Baltimore. He later publishes his autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Written by Himself, and becomes a leading abolitionist.

1839: The Amistad mutiny
Led by a West African named Cinque, slaves transported aboard the Spanish ship Amistad stage a mutiny, killing the entire crew except for the captain and first mate and demanding to be sailed back to Africa. Instead, the captain sails to New York. The rebels eventually win their freedom in a landmark Supreme Court case in which they are defended by former president John Quincy Adams.

1841: Creole revolt
Slaves revolt on the Creole, a slave trading ship sailing from Virginia to Louisiana. The rebels overpower the crew and successfully sail to the Bahamas, where they are granted asylum and freedom.

1849: Harriet Tubman escapes
Harriet Tubman escapes from slavery in Maryland. She becomes one of the best-known "conductors" on the Underground Railroad, returning to the South 19 times and helping more than 300 slaves escape to freedom.

1859: Harper’s Ferry Attack
Led by abolitionist John Brown, a group of slaves and white abolitionists stage an attack on Harper’s Ferry, Virginia. They capture the federal armory and arsenal before the insurrection is halted by local militia. Brown and the other captives are tried and executed. The raid hastens the advent of the Civil War, which starts two years later."

Independent Lens . NAT TURNER: A Troublesome Property . Slave Rebellions | PBS
Peasant rebellions historically do not overthrow their overlords. Local success which are temporary.
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Old 07-30-2016, 02:29 PM
 
Location: *
8,096 posts, read 2,416,063 times
Reputation: 2215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Felix C View Post
Peasant rebellions historically do not overthrow their overlords. Local success which are temporary.
Just to clarify, the American Civil War ended race based slavery whereas the slave rebellions were unsuccessful in doing so.
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Old 07-30-2016, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
22,477 posts, read 10,408,804 times
Reputation: 20327
Quote:
Originally Posted by InformedConsent View Post
No, it is not. The first legal slave owner in the American Colonies was indeed a Black man: Anthony Johnson.


Slavery in North America 1654-June 19, 1865?, MLK - Wesleyan University
So what?
If he owned another person he was an evil person.
Period.
Got it?

Last edited by phetaroi; 07-30-2016 at 02:45 PM..
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