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Old 07-31-2016, 09:15 AM
 
Location: 2 blocks from bay in L.I, NY
1,767 posts, read 1,437,091 times
Reputation: 2743

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PullMyFinger View Post
We just want them to get over it already. Other people have gotten over far worse much more quickly. How can you respect people who fight to maintain their victim status and demand sympathy and support? How can they look in the mirror? Pathetic is a word that comes to mind for someone to hide behind events that ended 150 years ago.
Too bad. You don't get to decide how long it takes someone else to get over their painful traumatic experience. Talking about what one has endured is thereapy. I'm sure you know this. Our ancestors endured over 200 years of trauma without recourse unless they risked violence, imprisonment, lynching or death by other means. They had to stuff their feelings causing it to fester, turn to bitterness and get passed down from generation to generation. We're finally at a place to give voice to our feelings publicly about their pain and suffering. If that makes some feel bad consider it a small price to pay relative to what they had to live through.
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Old 07-31-2016, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Right here; Right now
8,750 posts, read 4,436,782 times
Reputation: 1404
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeasonedNewbie View Post
That's no excuse to downplay the atrocities that happened. Some of the things that occurred during slavery (racism, discrimination, etc.) are still going on today. Telling Black people to "get over it" is equivalent to giving them and their history in this country two large middle fingers. Now that's pathetic.

Maybe if the 1% lost their wealth that was earned through slave labor, then we'll "get over it." Besides, bigotry and insensitivity don't taste very well on the tongue, does it?
No one is down playing anything, or, are they?

The White Slaves of Barbary | Ancient Origins
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Old 07-31-2016, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Right here; Right now
8,750 posts, read 4,436,782 times
Reputation: 1404
Default fester? stop picking at it ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Klassyhk View Post
Too bad. You don't get to decide how long it takes someone else to get over their painful traumatic experience. Talking about what one has endured is thereapy. I'm sure you know this. Our ancestors endured over 200 years of trauma without recourse unless they risked violence, imprisonment, lynching or death by other means. They had to stuff their feelings causing it to fester, turn to bitterness and get passed down from generation to generation. We're finally at a place to give voice to our feelings publicly about their pain and suffering. If that makes some feel bad consider it a small price to pay relative to what they had to live through.
http://www.city-data.com/forum/44918173-post135.html
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Old 07-31-2016, 09:40 AM
 
Location: 2 blocks from bay in L.I, NY
1,767 posts, read 1,437,091 times
Reputation: 2743
Another thing, sometimes when a person or group of people are talking about a past traumatic experience, the listener doesn't need to try to downplay the issue or become dismissive about it. Just listening to them is enough. Acknowledging that their feelings about their past is valid does a world of good more good than making it about you and how you feel. The world is bigger than you. If you feel guilt, the maybe you have something to apologize for on behalf of your ancestors. Once you do that your guilt is assuaged. Otherwise, nothing else is expected of you but to stop the narcissism (I don't like Mrs. Obama acknowledging the Slaves ingenuity, skill, and hard work contributioning to our great country).

Stop the god complex (we're not giving them anymore freebies, they should be grateful to our race for taking their ancestors from hell hole Africa, the slaves were well taken care of, etc.) and thinking that you have all the answers and know what's best for another person (group of people) when you've never been in their shoes.
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Old 07-31-2016, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Right here; Right now
8,750 posts, read 4,436,782 times
Reputation: 1404
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klassyhk View Post
Another thing, sometimes when a person or group of people are talking about a past traumatic experience, the listener doesn't need to try to downplay the issue or become dismissive about it. Just listening to them is enough. Acknowledging that their feelings about their past is valid does a world of good more good than making it about you and how you feel. The world is bigger than you. If you feel guilt, the maybe you have something to apologize for on behalf of your ancestors. Once you do that your guilt is assuaged. Otherwise, nothing else is expected of you but to stop the narcissism (I don't like Mrs. Obama acknowledging the Slaves ingenuity, skill, and hard work contributioning to our great country).

Stop the god complex (we're not giving them anymore freebies, they should be grateful to our race for taking their ancestors from hell hole Africa, the slaves were well taken care of, etc.) and thinking that you have all the answers and know what's best for another person (group of people) when you've never been in their shoes.
Quote:
group of people are talking about a past traumatic experience,
Who alive today has had this experience?
Quote:
The world is bigger than you.
Yes, it is.
The White Slaves of Barbary | Ancient Origins
"Much attention and condemnation has been directed towards the tragedy of the African slave trade, which took place between the 16 th and the 19 th centuries. However, another equally despicable trade in humans was taking place around the same time in the Mediterranean. It is estimated that up to 1.25 million Europeans were enslaved by the so-called Barbary corsairs, and their lives were just as pitiful as their African counterparts. They have come to be known as the white slaves of Barbary."
______

It is bigger than the both of us and not every one of the group you reference feels the same as the others. They do not live their lives in the wake of their ancestors and neither should any one else and they are living in the prosperity that is reflective of the choices they have made in today's time.

My mother was a German woman and I was born in the early 60's in Houston Texas. Just because my mother was German does not permit me to understand the German culture and or experiences of German customs. How would it?
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Old 07-31-2016, 10:15 AM
 
Location: 2 blocks from bay in L.I, NY
1,767 posts, read 1,437,091 times
Reputation: 2743
Default That's just it

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellis Bell View Post
Today it is a choice to cast fault on a society that when in its day would not have seen it as a fault, but as an accepted practice of that day.
The hole that is being dug is the one that people are hell bent on fixing a past or a perception of a past, that is no longer relevant to the choices they have today. It's your shovel.
No people like yourself, Taranova (sp), and other posters of that ilk make it worse by trying to shut down or dismiss when the Slaves contributions are acknowledged publicly. I'm glad Mrs. Obama's choice was to make the remark! Their contributions on not only serving inside but actually also in building the WH has once and for all publicly acknowledged on the world's stage. That honors them and their memory! Previous first ladies didn't do the same because it wasn't relevant to them. It's relevant to us African-Americans, so yes, thank you Mrs. Obama.

White people honor their ancestor's past accomplishments all the time with plaques, parade, foundations, buildings, etc) Being noble, brave, courageous, and hard-working is what we've heard about all Whites throughout our lives: in school, college, TV, movies, re-enactments, and monuments. Save for a very few names, our people because they were slaves went unacknowledged for their loyalty (other than fictitious Uncle Tom), skill, and hardwork. Because a prominent Black woman decided to change that, this thread is a mile long about how we just can't let it go, need to get over it, make better choices in life, stop looking for a handout (the first line of defense by those who can't argue sucessfully against our logic). If acknowledging our ancestors contributions in making this country great is not getting over it, then so be it. If acknowledging the pain, sorrow, and anger we feel about what they had to endure is not getting over it, then so be it. The shovel remains in your court.
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Old 07-31-2016, 10:38 AM
 
Location: NJ
16,924 posts, read 11,810,861 times
Reputation: 10901
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klassyhk View Post
Too bad. You don't get to decide how long it takes someone else to get over their painful traumatic experience. Talking about what one has endured is thereapy. I'm sure you know this. Our ancestors endured over 200 years of trauma without recourse unless they risked violence, imprisonment, lynching or death by other means. They had to stuff their feelings causing it to fester, turn to bitterness and get passed down from generation to generation. We're finally at a place to give voice to our feelings publicly about their pain and suffering. If that makes some feel bad consider it a small price to pay relative to what they had to live through.
They endured far more than 200 years as Africa practiced slavery as did other countries on other continents.


How did the germans, japanese and americans overcome the atrocities, violence, inhumanity, hate and prejudice spewed during WW2? hint, hint
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Old 07-31-2016, 11:43 AM
 
788 posts, read 342,079 times
Reputation: 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
I don't care what their intent was.
It didn't matter what their intent was.
The only thing that mattered was what they actually did.
And that's particularly true to those people who were slaves all or most of their lives.

As Hubert Humphrey said in an interview not long before his death from cancer, when asked if there are things he wish he'd done in his life, he said: "I don't belong to the should have club. It doesn't matter what you should have done or could have done. It only matters what you actually did."
You may not have noticed (apparently you haven't), but the long painful process set into motion by the Founders, came to a successful end under Lincoln, so they were successful.

We didn't land on the moon bright and early the day after JFK set it as a national goal. Imagine if you wanted to end pet ownership in the US. How long wold that take. Back then the Federal government was very weak and couldn't just issue an edict. If you knew history, you'd know this, but I suspect Ignorance makes a better bed for you to lie in.
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Old 07-31-2016, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Right here; Right now
8,750 posts, read 4,436,782 times
Reputation: 1404
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klassyhk View Post
No people like yourself, Taranova (sp), and other posters of that ilk make it worse by trying to shut down or dismiss when the Slaves contributions are acknowledged publicly. I'm glad Mrs. Obama's choice was to make the remark! Their contributions on not only serving inside but actually also in building the WH has once and for all publicly acknowledged on the world's stage. That honors them and their memory! Previous first ladies didn't do the same because it wasn't relevant to them. It's relevant to us African-Americans, so yes, thank you Mrs. Obama.

White people honor their ancestor's past accomplishments all the time with plaques, parade, foundations, buildings, etc) Being noble, brave, courageous, and hard-working is what we've heard about all Whites throughout our lives: in school, college, TV, movies, re-enactments, and monuments. Save for a very few names, our people because they were slaves went unacknowledged for their loyalty (other than fictitious Uncle Tom), skill, and hardwork. Because a prominent Black woman decided to change that, this thread is a mile long about how we just can't let it go, need to get over it, make better choices in life, stop looking for a handout (the first line of defense by those who can't argue sucessfully against our logic). If acknowledging our ancestors contributions in making this country great is not getting over it, then so be it. If acknowledging the pain, sorrow, and anger we feel about what they had to endure is not getting over it, then so be it. The shovel remains in your court.
Mrs. Obama is an American and for most people whose ancestry dates back to other countries, being an American means something to them.
Quote:
Being noble, brave, courageous, and hard-working is what we've heard about all Whites throughout our lives.
Yet you have heard nothing of their shackles.
Quote:
and anger we feel about what they had to endure
The injustice is not laying our ancestors to rest, where's the honor in that?

Plaques, parades and foundations are just things that pale in comparison to the actual accomplishments of the black person in today's society, in scientific discoveries, business men, lawyers, state representatives or the White House.

I don't need the shovel, thank you.
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Old 07-31-2016, 11:51 AM
 
21,495 posts, read 11,595,731 times
Reputation: 12268
Quote:
Originally Posted by Klassyhk View Post
Too bad. You don't get to decide how long it takes someone else to get over their painful traumatic experience. Talking about what one has endured is thereapy. I'm sure you know this. Our ancestors endured over 200 years of trauma without recourse unless they risked violence, imprisonment, lynching or death by other means. They had to stuff their feelings causing it to fester, turn to bitterness and get passed down from generation to generation. We're finally at a place to give voice to our feelings publicly about their pain and suffering. If that makes some feel bad consider it a small price to pay relative to what they had to live through.
Maybe you should move somewhere where people have time to worry about your hurt feeling over something that happened to people you never met.
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