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View Poll Results: Super Intelligence a Liability?
Yes 5 19.23%
No 17 65.38%
Can't Read 4 15.38%
Voters: 26. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-21-2016, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
36,960 posts, read 45,395,424 times
Reputation: 61438

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In my experience, the super intelligent lack certain qualities that we others possess. I am not the sharpest knife in the drawer, but I make up for it in other ways.

 
Old 11-21-2016, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Hudson Valley/Upper Downstate/Lower Upstate
439 posts, read 253,693 times
Reputation: 556
Quote:
Originally Posted by coldwine View Post
I had not planned for a live demonstration, but this does support my argument nicely.
I know, right.
 
Old 11-21-2016, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Hudson Valley/Upper Downstate/Lower Upstate
439 posts, read 253,693 times
Reputation: 556
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
In my experience, the super intelligent lack certain qualities that we others possess. I am not the sharpest knife in the drawer, but I make up for it in other ways.
Like what? You got a pocket full of spoons or somethin'?
 
Old 11-21-2016, 04:44 PM
 
12,403 posts, read 3,867,346 times
Reputation: 3764
So the diverse, liberals are the super intelligent who the dumb, white conservative average American fear?
 
Old 11-21-2016, 04:55 PM
 
3,592 posts, read 7,690,810 times
Reputation: 2873
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtl1 View Post
So the diverse, liberals are the super intelligent who the dumb, white conservative average American fear?
I don't think anyone was claiming that.

One need look no further than the way Republicans talk to their own constituents to see that they certainly believe there is a correlation between intelligence/education and distrust.
 
Old 11-21-2016, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Austin
29,518 posts, read 16,422,678 times
Reputation: 8061
Quote:
Originally Posted by coldwine View Post
I think most Americans, but specifically the conservative/Trump supporters, just want things to be "simple".
.
I think many Americans, but specifically the Hillary supporters, just want things to be "simple" so they can understand them.
 
Old 11-21-2016, 05:10 PM
 
3,592 posts, read 7,690,810 times
Reputation: 2873
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadking2003 View Post
I think many Americans, but specifically the Hillary supporters, just want things to be "simple" so they can understand them.
I think you can do better than this.
 
Old 11-21-2016, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Here and now.
11,917 posts, read 3,600,323 times
Reputation: 12844
It's going to be hard to answer this with the seriousness it deserves without unintentionally offending, but I want to give it a shot.

I think a there is a strong tendency to distrust people who seem to be too intellectual, or too concerned with nuance, rather than simple, strictly emotional answers. I see evidence of it all the time, most typically in the form of mocking people with "useless" degrees. Being trained for a specific job is a fine thing, but what is the cause of such hostility toward learning for the sake of knowledge? I don't mean just formal education, either. Some of the most intelligent people I know have been almost entirely self-taught. But almost without fail, they simply loved to learn.

On the other hand...I think some people who seem to resent the highly intelligent, or more accurately, those they consider overeducated, are tired of being talked down to, or being left with that feeling, whether intended or not. Few people are offended by quiet wisdom, or greater knowledge, respectfully presented. No one likes a person they perceive as a snob.

I think, too, that there is a certain amount of willful ignorance, not necessarily related to inborn ability, that results in people simply not wanting to be exposed to anything that challenges their view of the world. I see it on the left and the right, folks who have one or two favorite TV channels or websites from which they get all their information, and anything that deviates remotely from that script is dismissed as false.

I think it is absolutely true that most people don't read anymore, as in actual books. Maybe they are just too busy, but I think often it's more a matter of mental laziness, and a desire for instant gratification. Books, unlike tweets, take time. But that probably makes me sound like a snob, so there you go...

/ramble
 
Old 11-21-2016, 06:04 PM
 
Location: N Atlanta
4,597 posts, read 3,381,881 times
Reputation: 2311
The super intelligent are usually super lazy as they're too busy thinking to get anything done. Nothing to fear ...
 
Old 11-21-2016, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,519 posts, read 3,595,125 times
Reputation: 3543
Quote:
Originally Posted by coldwine View Post
I think most Americans, but specifically the conservative/Trump supporters, just want things to be "simple".

You can see this "simple" theme repeated constantly. All situations should be simple. All solutions should be obvious. There should never be a shade of gray, and if there is, the lack of a simple solution means they are extraordinarily unprepared. That leads to reactionary politics.

Education and intelligence make things complex. That we live in a world where the situation is naturally complex is not the point. If a simple, plain solution was not available, then a third party suggesting the situation is more complicated is to blame.
I agree with this. The thing is is that things especially in politics are never simplistic. For an example let's look at employment or labor. We used to have things like if you could do the job, living, and a male you could work. But then people complained about child labor. So we had regulations and laws to set standards on what is considered a child in the employment world. Women also complained about workers' rights. So we had regulations and laws to fit that. People then complained about workers' safety especially in industries like mining. So then we had to build agencies, laws, and regulations to fit that. One of the things that came along with workers' safety was worker's comp, that was also added as a worker's protection. Then we created unions, paid vacation, hour laws, disability, etc. The truth is is if things were just as simple as "can you do this? Awesome, you're hired!" We saw a lot of problems. Employment and labor laws have become only more and more complicated as time went on. Now there's a lot of backlash to these laws, complaining they interfere with our competitiveness to keep jobs here. So now this comes into play, do we fight against free trade agreements? Do we put more laws and regulations on corporations to prevent them from hiring H1Bs, visas, etc.?

This also applies to a lot of things we have taken on politically. Like healthcare.

Employment laws are a mess but they are for a reason. People fought to make them a mess so they had more protection. I fear that those advocating for "simplicity" are never the ones who actually have experience in the field they're discussing (for an example how much do you think an accountant for say an automotive company knows about the healthcare industry? How much do you think a B2B salesman knows about employment laws?) Failing to understand the dynamics and intersectionality of how laws and regulations work is what scares me the most. IN SUM, we should be fearing the unintelligent the most... Those who don't read studies done by educated people rather read Fox News or CNN and then form an opinion. Changing policy in anyway creates a ripple effect, I think all can see the obvious first ripple but to see the second, third, fourth becomes harder with lack of experience in said field. Those who cannot see beyond the first ripple, or the obvious effects of a policy, scare me the most.

I'll make an example. The GI Bill. It basically put people in the suburbs and helped to create the wealth and prosperity we saw post-WWII. However the GI Bill was discriminatory back in the day and a lot of minorities were denied, so they moved to the inner cities which were left to, err, deteriorate as most of the wealth moved elsewhere. The GI Bill, on top of a combination of culture and other policies, helped to create the reason why minorities are not as far along as white people on average economically. I doubt the proponents back in the days of creating the GI Bill knew or cared how this would affect minorities. They probably thought, "Hey this helps war heroes, we should do it!" Which was a good thing, of course, but since it wasn't applied equally, it hurt others. GI Bill's first ripple: helping rebuild American veterans after the war. GI Bill's second ripple: Minorities were denied benefits due to discrimination. GI Bill's third ripple: Minorities suffering decades of economic disadvantages because of the second ripple. People saw the obvious first ripple, its intended application, and voted yes without considering anything else. Now we see what we see today. Voters should be more analytical in the laws they vote for, and to consider any potential "unintended consequences/benefits" before voting. I'm afraid to see that most people don't do that, which is why I feel the opposite, and we should be fearing the unintelligent who vote.
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