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Old 01-27-2017, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Alaska
417 posts, read 223,028 times
Reputation: 806

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PedroMartinez View Post
You are using a different definition of a machinist than what is traditionally used. A machinist in every manufacturing industry I've been in makes parts, mostly in metal, not repair machines. They will set up the machine, in most cases, with the right tools and gigs before machining the parts, but they traditionally do not repair machines. Have you ever been in manufacturing?

Technology has taken away electrician tasks, that is just a fact.
Yes, I work on staffing for a large Agriculture equipment manufacturer. For us that is the tool and die makers who make the parts, the tool and die makers send the parts to the machinists then the machinsts fix the machine. Have you worked in large factories before?

Yes but technology has also added jobs for Electricans, now they have to clean the bar code eyes, and have to run the lights on a computer, the computer will throw a code saying a light on a floor is out and the electricans have to go and fix it.
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Old 01-27-2017, 09:29 AM
 
28,985 posts, read 15,261,989 times
Reputation: 19774
Quote:
Originally Posted by ffaemily View Post
Yes, I work on staffing for a large Agriculture equipment manufacturer. For us that is the tool and die makers who make the parts, the tool and die makers send the parts to the machinists then the machinsts fix the machine. Have you worked in large factories before?

Yes but technology has also added jobs for Electricans, now they have to clean the bar code eyes, and have to run the lights on a computer, the computer will throw a code saying a light on a floor is out and the electricans have to go and fix it.
Yes, I worked in the manufacturing industry for over two decades.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Machinist

Quote:
A machinist is a person who uses machine tools to make or modify parts, primarily metal parts. This process of machining is accomplished by using machine tools to cut away excess material much as a woodcarver cuts away excess wood to produce his work. In addition to metal, the parts may be made of many other kinds of materials, such as plastic or wood products. The goal of these cutting operations is to produce a part that conforms to a set of specifications, or tolerances, usually in the form of engineering drawings commonly known as blueprints.
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Old 01-27-2017, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Sitting on a bar stool. Guinness in hand.
4,429 posts, read 5,653,055 times
Reputation: 1698
Gen X here.

Not you demographic but was young at one time.

I think some millenials would and some millenials wouldn't. Depends on the individual's mind set. I found some people are very Career driven individuals that want to climb to the top of their fields and want to get the most out of that career choice along the way (money, status, etc.) usually the people also require a job to be personally fulfilling. On the other hand some people just want a steady job (whatever that maybe...fulfilling or not), that includes some job advancement, hopefully has some type of health insurance coverage, will pay them enough to cover the bills/expenses and have enough money left over for some leisure activities. Of course their are all shades in between these two types of people in general.

I think the second mindset is closer to the mindset I have. I understand it and understand the people who have it. Look I worked in low level/mid-level retail jobs a lot of my younger years. And while I'm not sure if I can exactly equate retail to a manufacturing job.... I think the job arcs are somewhat similar and the people who typically fill those types of jobs have a similar "job" mindset.

I must say that I have had mixed results working in the retail sector. I had one really good retail job, as a supervisor, where I received reasonable pay for what I did. Received health benefits, a stock plan/ retirement plan, and a couple of weeks of vacation (after a year a year in the company). The only thing I did get was sick days (which to me was never a big deal). In turn for those thing. I would show on time, was willing to work weekend frequently, Work ALL holidays (they never meant that much to me anyways), stay late fairly often (sometimes work double), Cover sickout/last minute call outs, and (something I think helped me in my this job) I always tried my best to make my managers look good to their bosses. So I say I was very content in this job. Though let me state that the job itself was not fulfilling for me but it did allow just enough room to pay for activities that did. Heck. The only reason why I left this job was because I'd met my future significant other who got a job in another state....so I followed.
I also had a terrible retail job (and it wasn't my first retail job) where the company gave me meager pay and........yeah.....that it. Needless to say my motivation was not nearly at the level it was for the first job I meantioned and left as soon as some else came along.

So what I'm trying to get at in the end of this post....is to say....yes there will be millenials (perhaps some Xers) that will be willing to take those jobs readily IF they also come with some of the perks I mentioned above.
By the way these jobs don't necessarily have to get everything upfront. Some of the perks can be implemented incrementally if the employee shows their worth. Granted the employer should state that upfront.
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Old 01-27-2017, 09:34 AM
 
28,985 posts, read 15,261,989 times
Reputation: 19774
I could probably spend three hours to list current postings looking for machinists and have hundreds that are just like this:

Manual Machinist - Springfield, OH 45504 - Indeed Mobile

Press Technology & Mfg., Inc., a leading manufacturer of dewatering equipment, has need of a manual machinist. Must be able to read blue prints and have experience running large manual mills and lathes. Must pass drug screening. Competitive wages/health insurance. Apply after 8:00 am at 1401 Fotler Street, Springfield, OH 45504, e-mail or fax resume 937-327-0756 .

-------

I think you'd have a very difficult time finding many jobs posted for a machinist who fixes machines.

Whatever company you worked at didn't use the term machinist like most of the manufacturing world.
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Old 01-27-2017, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Alaska
417 posts, read 223,028 times
Reputation: 806
Quote:
Originally Posted by PedroMartinez View Post
Yes, I worked in the manufacturing industry for over two decades.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Machinist
How about you look at a job description for a machinist instead of Wikipedia

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...mXfY8E8rMeQTyA
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Old 01-27-2017, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Alaska
417 posts, read 223,028 times
Reputation: 806
Hmm maybe it's a regional thing. In the midwest we have tool and die makers who make the tools, and the machinst who fix the machines in a factory setting.
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Old 01-27-2017, 09:37 AM
 
12,006 posts, read 6,604,654 times
Reputation: 12814
The thing for any young person making decisions about their future is to do thorough research at the source. Many jobs can be outsourced eventually, so it is important to be smart and do a lot of in depth research before investing in their education and a career path.
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Old 01-27-2017, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Research Triangle Area, NC
3,652 posts, read 2,505,319 times
Reputation: 5239
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
I'm not a millennial, but manufacturing is good, honest work. That said, nothing, other than the serious suppression of wages is going to restore the US to a manufacturing economy. That ship has sailed.
Indeed...I find it hilarious that all of these people under the delusion that Trump deporting all of the brown people and saying "f-off EPA we're going to manufacture whatever we want however we want, wherever we want" is going to actually bring them any prosperity...

You know what was one of the main factors driving middle-class prosperity for the manufacturing-based US economy of the mid 20th century?...UNIONS. (yes WWII kick-started it; but unions kept it going for about 30 years after)

Prior to said prosperity you had the guilded age where there was a surge of wealthy industrialists and a ton of factory jobs but they were incredibly dangerous and paid next to nothing... large domineering middle class wasn't a thing back then.

You think for one second that Trump or his teamsters are going to support union-wages for all of these jobs he supposedly is going to get back for "average joe"?
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Old 01-27-2017, 09:39 AM
 
28,985 posts, read 15,261,989 times
Reputation: 19774
Quote:
Originally Posted by ffaemily View Post
How about you look at a job description for a machinist instead of Wikipedia

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...mXfY8E8rMeQTyA
They may have to do a repair from time to time, but the primary job of a machinist is to fabricate parts on a mill or lathe. What would you say is the primary responsibility of the job you just listed?
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Old 01-27-2017, 09:45 AM
 
28,985 posts, read 15,261,989 times
Reputation: 19774
Quote:
Originally Posted by ffaemily View Post
Hmm maybe it's a regional thing. In the midwest we have tool and die makers who make the tools, and the machinst who fix the machines in a factory setting.
That's very possible. It may also be different in different industries.

I've been in the petrochemical manufacturing industry, and in the facilities that make sensor bodies, valve components, compressor pistons, etc, all the people running the mills and lathes are referred to as machinists while the people who repair those mills and lathes are in the maintenance departments and referred to as maintenance personnel.
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