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Old 08-16-2017, 04:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fat lou View Post
I read somewhere else that many monuments were put up in the early 1900s because that's when many Civil War veterans started to die of old age. Which probably makes more sense than these explanations proffered by people who need to spin everything so that it comports with their own socio-political views.
So you believe the fact that they started building them and re-adopting Confederate symbols, such as the battle flag, during the same time period that they were also enacting Jim Crow laws was just a coincidence?

Quote:
Originally Posted by my54ford View Post
should have paid more attention in school folks, In Lee's Last Retreat: The Flight to Appomattox, historian William Marvel identified Private Pleasant Riggs Crump, of Talladega County, Alabama, who died December 31, 1951, as the last confirmed surviving veteran of the Confederate States Army ...There were thousands alive in the 1900's Why wouldn't they put up monuments???
I don't know...maybe because people don't generally erect monuments to traitors who lost their attempted rebellion. What about the fact that men, such as Lee, felt very strongly that no monuments be erected?

The monuments were built to support the Lost Cause narrative and to propagate an image of white superiority in the era of Jim Crow and later again during the Civil Rights movement.
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Old 08-16-2017, 04:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fat lou View Post
I read somewhere else that many monuments were put up in the early 1900s because that's when many Civil War veterans started to die of old age. Which probably makes more sense than these explanations proffered by people who need to spin everything so that it comports with their own socio-political views.
Maybe -- but biggest spike was the 60's -- it was -- it just was.

And interesting to see who funds and why.

It's part of the problem that many don't know about
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Old 08-16-2017, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Long Island
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moneill View Post
Maybe -- but biggest spike was the 60's -- it was -- it just was.

And interesting to see who funds and why.

It's part of the problem that many don't know about
The largest spike was 1909, that was the year the NAACP was founded, there was an effort to get blacks to vote and the Jim Crow Laws were in opposition. It appears these monuments were related to a loss of power by white people.

Last edited by Goodnight; 08-16-2017 at 04:46 PM..
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Old 08-16-2017, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Del Rio, TN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodnight View Post
Interesting that most were from 1900 to 1940 then another spike around 1950 to 1968 leading up to the Civil Rights Act. Also many schools named after the confederacy just prior to the civil rights act. Many schools even in the last 30 years, all of this seems very odd considering the civil war ended in 1865. They even have confederate monuments that were recently dedicated in union states like Iowa.


https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/...ry-trump#img-1
We have buildings, schools and roads still being named for MLK. In case you didn't notice, he's been dead for 49 years.

Of course the same could be said of naming things after any of our founding fathers. Legacy goes on after the individual's death.
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Old 08-16-2017, 04:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toyman at Jewel Lake View Post
We have buildings, schools and roads still being named for MLK. In case you didn't notice, he's been dead for 49 years.

Of course the same could be said of naming things after any of our founding fathers. Legacy goes on after the individual's death.
..and what legacy is represented by Lee, Davis, Jackson, Hill and Beauregard?
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Old 08-16-2017, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Long Island
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toyman at Jewel Lake View Post
We have buildings, schools and roads still being named for MLK. In case you didn't notice, he's been dead for 49 years.

Of course the same could be said of naming things after any of our founding fathers. Legacy goes on after the individual's death.
I am not questioning that some things occur decades later but looking at the timing of the monuments and the sudden spikes associated with other events really makes the motives suspect. I don't believe this happened in other wars not to mention that this was a civil war. Why is Iowa putting up these monuments 130 years after the war ended when they were not even part of the confederacy.
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Old 08-16-2017, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Del Rio, TN
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Originally Posted by NJGOAT View Post
..and what legacy is represented by Lee, Davis, Jackson, Hill and Beauregard?
The OPs point seemed to be that war heroes were still being honored decades after their deaths, and that there was something wrong with that. I'm pointing out that many people are honored decades after their death.
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Old 08-16-2017, 05:01 PM
 
22,769 posts, read 28,472,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodnight View Post
Interesting that most were from 1900 to 1940 then another spike around 1950 to 1968 leading up to the Civil Rights Act. Also many schools named after the confederacy just prior to the civil rights act. Many schools even in the last 30 years, all of this seems very odd considering the civil war ended in 1865. They even have confederate monuments that were recently dedicated in union states like Iowa.


https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/...ry-trump#img-1
The schools were named that way in the 1960's because that's when the school districts in the south were desegregated, and hundreds of 'white flight' academies were founded.

My understanding is that the monuments were typically built between around 1890 and 1930, as the civil war generation was dying off.

In general the period of U.S. politics between 1870 and 1910 is pretty complicated, and not something most people know very well, myself included. But the people of the south were starving and traumatized immediately after the civil war, they weren't building monuments.
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Old 08-16-2017, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Minnysoda
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJGOAT View Post
So you believe the fact that they started building them and re-adopting Confederate symbols, such as the battle flag, during the same time period that they were also enacting Jim Crow laws was just a coincidence?



I don't know...maybe because people don't generally erect monuments to traitors who lost their attempted rebellion. What about the fact that men, such as Lee, felt very strongly that no monuments be erected?

The monuments were built to support the Lost Cause narrative and to propagate an image of white superiority in the era of Jim Crow and later again during the Civil Rights movement.
Seems to coincide with KKK being a National Democratic orginization
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Old 08-16-2017, 05:32 PM
 
4,092 posts, read 1,669,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodnight View Post
I don't believe that was the case for either the WW1, WW2 veterans, I don't have the numbers but it seems they were mostly in the first decade after the wars ended. After Vietnam the monuments were delayed somewhat but that was a very different war.
Yes, there's often a push to up war memorials when most of the people who fought in that war begin to die off. Some things aren't about your socio-political views/issues with white people.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QI2aWk_OASQ

Last edited by fat lou; 08-16-2017 at 05:44 PM..
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