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View Poll Results: Should employers be allowed to check potential employees credit?
Yes. 71 42.01%
No. 90 53.25%
Indifferent/No Answer. 8 4.73%
Voters: 169. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-26-2017, 05:36 PM
 
Location: NJ/NY
9,638 posts, read 9,475,466 times
Reputation: 6757

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
Yes, there is. There is an abundance of data and articles that say exactly what I am telling you; there is no correlation between bad credit and employee performance/criminality. As a matter of fact, often times people have bad credit for the very reason potential employers should be barred from checking it. Unemployment is a major obstacle that hinders people from paying their bills.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/does-ba...-bad-employee/
I would love to see the actual study but the link in the article no longer has the study.

But, your article does say this...

Quote:
Still, don't count on many employers giving up the practice of using credit as a tool to screen job applicants: The researchers also found that credit scores were correlated with certain personality traits--traits that employers care about.
Quote:
What your credit score says about you

Here are the traits that did seem to be linked to credit scores:

Conscientiousness: Employers care about this one. And employees with higher credit scores tended to also score higher on conscientiousness on the personality test.

Loyalty: Workers with higher credit scores scored higher on a scale of "organizational citizenship," and were more likely to show loyalty to their employers.
Which is some pretty important stuff to an employer.

But as I said, I usually like to see the actual study so I can pick it apart.
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Old 11-26-2017, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Buckeye, AZ
25,410 posts, read 14,505,191 times
Reputation: 9215
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnesthesiaMD View Post
I would love to see the actual study but the link in the article no longer has the study.

But, your article does say this...




Which is some pretty important stuff to an employer.

But as I said, I usually like to see the actual study so I can pick it apart.
And identity theft is becoming a problem. In 2p16 it rose 16% from 2015 and 1 in 16 adults will have their identity compromised. https://www.usatoday.com/story/money...2016/97398548/ With Experian this year making over one half of American and over half of working age Americans at risk, it will EASILY be a problem. Sadly reporting it don't instantly reverses credit ratings like credit card fraud does. https://www.fiscaltiger.com/identity...-credit-score/
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Old 11-26-2017, 06:55 PM
 
13,805 posts, read 4,089,738 times
Reputation: 5049
Quote:
Originally Posted by PedroMartinez View Post
^^^^^This.

If an employer wants to only hire bank tellers that can juggle oranges, that should be the employer's right.
But thankfully it is not.
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Old 11-27-2017, 05:54 AM
 
27,993 posts, read 19,657,034 times
Reputation: 16471
Quote:
Originally Posted by I love boots. View Post
What is it you aren't telling us here? Did you co sign loans for him or something? He has a whole other social security number and is a whole other 3rd person. That isn't just an accident. I would say he somehow has a connection to your credit and they had reason to check it.
No cosigning. Yes, it was a glaring negligent mistake on behalf of whoever performed the check.
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Old 11-27-2017, 06:17 AM
 
Location: OH->FL->NJ
7,764 posts, read 7,260,700 times
Reputation: 3095
Against except for certain jobs with security clearances and other fiduciary responsibilities where it is truly relevant.
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Old 11-27-2017, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Kansas
19,189 posts, read 14,074,451 times
Reputation: 18141
Quote:
Originally Posted by BMORE View Post
There’s a limited amount of jobs, in my view, that should require a credit-check; do you all feel they should be allowed to ask? I hope we can pass legislation in my town regarding credit checks.
If you go to buy auto or home insurance, you'll realize in the paperwork you sign that you authorize a credit check. A good score (like we have ) saves one quite a bite over someone with a not so good score.

Also, with a shortage of jobs, employers can afford to pick and choose, and if you don't want to sign releases for them to gather info on you, the next guy or gal that doesn't mind will get the job. So choice is involved.

I figured it had probably been "studied": https://www.deseretnews.com/article/...-score-up.html and http://www.cnn.com/2010/LIVING/07/12...dit/index.html
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Old 11-27-2017, 07:28 AM
 
5,588 posts, read 2,121,558 times
Reputation: 2907
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohhwanderlust View Post
Negotiate? The employer almost always has the upper hand in negotiations, as there are many more people who need to keep a roof over their heads than there are people hiring.

Unless you're in a super specialized highly in-demand role du jour (which is difficult to predict in the number of years prior that it'd take to be qualified for that role), you're pretty much professionally begging the employer to pick you.
Appeal to emotion.

That said...the employer does indeed "own" the job, and should have the freedom of association to offer that job to whomever they wish according to whatever criteria they choose. Jobs are not a right, but the freedom of association is. Job interviews always have been and will continue to be popularity contests, where "popular" is based on all manner of subjective criteria. Credit checks are no different than tons of other background info that gives the employer a way to gauge whether or not they should initiate an employment relationship with someone.

Another thing to consider is how hard it is to fire people in the modern day. Offering a job at this point is tantamount to a lifelong commitment. So employers are becoming increasingly selective and cautious. Good for them, it's their business.
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Old 11-27-2017, 07:28 AM
Status: "DON'T VOTE" (set 1 day ago)
 
26,722 posts, read 14,969,769 times
Reputation: 12553
Quote:
Originally Posted by G1.. View Post
But thankfully it is not.
Employers should have every right to check the backround and set criteria for anyone that they will potentially entrust their business with.
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Old 11-27-2017, 07:30 AM
 
Location: The Republic of Texas
60,182 posts, read 30,630,253 times
Reputation: 12828
Quote:
Originally Posted by BMORE View Post
There’s a limited amount of jobs, in my view, that should require a credit-check; do you all feel they should be allowed to ask? I hope we can pass legislation in my town regarding credit checks.


It all depends how "high profile" your job is going to be.
White collar v. Blue collar.
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Old 11-27-2017, 07:39 AM
 
25,345 posts, read 37,490,972 times
Reputation: 13268
Depending on the job description. Usually people with bad credit will commit fraud faster than someone with good credit.

Overall, white crime is committed by people working in places where money can easily be commingled or put into their own account and every program you see about these type of crimes, are from people who have huge debt/bad credit!
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