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Old 02-17-2018, 10:49 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
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New Hampshire has high property taxes.
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Old 02-17-2018, 11:08 PM
 
Location: 15 months till retirement and I can leave the hell hole of New Yakistan
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Originally Posted by lovecrowds View Post
Depends, Texas has no income tax but many houses have extremely high property tax rate. Texas is projected to have huge enrollment increases in the educational system and the state has been reducing state aid percentages so property taxes will likely increase beyond their already extremely high levels.

Nevada has no state income tax, low sales tax rates and extremely low property tax rates. Nevada also has lots of property tax limitations also where property tax increases can only increase slightly year after year.

https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sal...ect/10_zm/6_p/

https://www.zillow.com/homes/for_sal...629_rect/9_zm/

Here are two homes of similar size in the 250,000-300,000 range.

The home is Nevada has $1,800 in property tax.

The one in Texas has $6,000 in property tax.

Texas in general in my opinion when one adds in the relatively high state and local taxes and extremely high property taxes really is a moderate tax state.

Nevada, South Dakota, Florida have low taxes across the board with very low sales and relatively low property taxes in addition to the no state income tax.

Washington and New Hampshire seem to have moderate property tax rates but they have a very level of service with the no state income tax.

Florida is like Nevada with low property tax rates, low sales tax rates and no state income tax and it is because of the low birth rate.

Texas is just slightly lower than mormon Utah on birth-rates with extremely high birth rates so the demand for educational services is very high so that causes property taxes to be very high in Texas.


I agree with most of you post...two caveats though

Nevada has some of the worst schools and the highest dropout rate in the country...and Florida does NOT have low property taxes...they are moderate to high
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Old 02-18-2018, 03:55 AM
 
Location: Florida
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Originally Posted by workingclasshero View Post
I agree with most of you post...two caveats though

Nevada has some of the worst schools and the highest dropout rate in the country...and Florida does NOT have low property taxes...they are moderate to high
It’s all relative. When I lived in New England, my property taxes were $5,000. In Florida, they’re around $1,800. There’s the homestead exemption here, too.
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Old 02-18-2018, 06:09 AM
 
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Originally Posted by BrooklynJo View Post
Seems like tax is the biggest thing people complain about. I often hear people cite states with no income tax as the best states to live in.

Is this true or does the state with no income tax get you another way?

How is life compared to two states (one with state income vs one without?)
I moved from my native California to Texas. I may not stay in Texas (I've been here for 10 years), but I would never move back to a state that has an income tax. I would only consider living in Nevada, Florida, Washington, Texas, or (after the Hall Tax on dividends and interest disappears in 2022) Tennessee.

A positive about "other ways that they may get you" is that they are simple and aren't a "can of worms of potential liability". Car registration can be high in Nevada, but it is simple and the cost can be mitigated by driving older, cheaper cars. Property taxes can be high in Texas, but that can be mitigated by buying a less expensive property, choosing an area that has a lower tax rate, and choosing a county where it may be easier to effectively protest any property tax increases. A thousand page thread could probably be started about the IRS, what they tell you, and who is liable for the interpretation . Avoiding the potential of having that on a state level is, IMO, a good thing.
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Old 02-18-2018, 06:15 AM
 
Location: The Republic of Texas
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Originally Posted by Haakon View Post
If your income is low you might prefer a high income tax/low sales tax state. If your income is high you might prefer a no income tax/high sales tax state.


No income tax here and our sales tax is not statewide. Sales taxing is community decided(city, town, county)

Sales tax here in Austin, is 8.25%, but go to a little community that has been surrounded by the city, that still have their own government, and sales tax is 7%
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Old 02-18-2018, 06:32 AM
 
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Originally Posted by AnotherTouchOfWhimsy View Post
It’s all relative. When I lived in New England, my property taxes were $5,000. In Florida, they’re around $1,800. There’s the homestead exemption here, too.
Yep.

But off the top of my head though, Florida can get you with high homeowners insurance, and higher car insurance (which in some ways has its root in Florida being a no-fault insurance state). The former can be mitigated by buying an inexpensive condo, or living on a boat or in a large RV/motorhome, and the latter can be avoided by being a snowbird from a low tax state like SD or WY, and having your car insurance, DL, and plates based in that other state.

A some of the pure no state income tax states are also right to work states, and also don't allow collective bargaining for many public employees.
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Old 02-18-2018, 06:47 AM
 
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Originally Posted by BrooklynJo View Post
The difference a boarder can make!

Not only that, Oregon has no sales tax...so you can live on one side of the river (in Vancouver, WA), and shop on the other side of the Columbia River in Portland, OR. You actually don't even have to go completely across the river.....the Jantzen Beach Center is on Hayden Island (which is in Oregon, off I-5) in the middle of the river.
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Old 02-18-2018, 06:54 AM
 
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Originally Posted by brentwoodgirl View Post
Not necessarily true. Tennessee has no income tax and very low real estate taxes in most of the state. The sales tax is higher than average, but not the highest in the country. People who move to TN regularly comment on the c-d board that they are amazed at how low the tax burden here is and how much the state and local governments can do. I live in the 7th wealthiest county in the country, just south of Nashville, with some amazing schools, wonderful parks and libraries and ridiculously low taxes.

We have looked at other areas due to possibly job relocations in the past, and the amount of taxes some states have is insane. We would be paying $10,000s more for worse schools and less amenities.


I don't have kids, but if someone told me I had to have kids, had to send them to public schools, and had to live in a non coastal area, and it had to be somewhere in the U.S., I would without a doubt pick either the Brentwood/Franklin area (your area), or Signal Mountain (suburban Chattanooga). I have some friends who live in Franklin, and have kids. He is a Nashville area native, and she is a California native who moved to Nashville before they met. She doesn't miss California, and would never move back to California.
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Old 02-18-2018, 07:06 AM
 
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Originally Posted by BentBow View Post
No income tax here and our sales tax is not statewide. Sales taxing is community decided(city, town, county)

Sales tax here in Austin, is 8.25%, but go to a little community that has been surrounded by the city, that still have their own government, and sales tax is 7%
Yeah, Texas has the weird 6.25% state minimum with the local flexibility of up to 2%.

I live in The Woodlands (8.25%), but I own a rental in a nearby area that used to be 6.25%, but is now 7.25% after a 1% additional Emergency Management District tax was voted in....after failing a few times. One of the local Walmarts (the one on Sawdust Road) was across the street from the border of The Woodlands Township when the store opened 10 years ago, and they charged 6.25% sales tax. Eventually, the township changed their boundary to include the store, and the sales tax rate at that store is now the full 8.25%.
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Old 02-18-2018, 08:43 AM
 
11,497 posts, read 3,141,729 times
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Originally Posted by American Expat View Post
Totally agree with what you posted. We briefly considered returning to Texas in retirement in the near future and visited friends in The Woodlands a few months ago and their property tx and insurance are much higher than ours in Washington state and you can go to a cheaper area of Washington to live as we are doing. Nevada is also a good option imo.
I live in The Woodlands...and don't like the property taxes...but what will likely cause me to leave Texas is being too far away from Alpine skiing. I don't want to live in El Paso, and other areas with decent amenities are too far away from Alpine skiing. I'll likely head to Las Vegas (NV not NM), and also get a small place in Brian Head, UT (a little over 190 miles from the edge of the Las Vegas metro) with the other option of day trips to closer Las Vegas Ski and Snowboard Resort (35 miles from the NW corner of the metro) also available.

Some cheaper (non King County ) areas of Washington 'don't get enough love'...Spokane Valley (and other areas in and around Spokane), some of the area between the Vancouver area and just south of the park (Olympic), Port Townsend, parts of Whidbey Island, Sequim, part of the area around Blaine, etc.
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