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Old 07-06-2018, 06:26 AM
 
Location: LEAVING CD
22,952 posts, read 22,542,487 times
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Interesting article on the "opioids" crisis from the NIH and CDC. Certainly NOT in line with what we've been led to believe by the MSM and many elected officials.
Quote:
:
In brief, while prescription opioids continue to play a part in the crisis, illicit opioids such as heroin and illicitly manufactured fentanyl, not prescription opioids and overprescribing, are currently the driving forces behind the increase in unintentional overdose deaths in the United States
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5659223/

What's even more interesting is a web search comes up with many articles stating that the deaths attributed to prescription opioids is being overstated by at least half.
This is reportedly due to how LEO's and medical report the deaths. They are reported as "opioid overdose" and rarely is the actual opiate described.

My question is "if the NIH and CDC report are correct what exactly is the agenda behind this hysteria"?
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Old 07-06-2018, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Metro Detroit, Michigan
12,675 posts, read 14,014,541 times
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I don't think there is an agenda. The police aren't experts on everything. They know a thing or two about prescription drugs, but they are not experts. We shouldn't expect them to be. I don't think it's necessary for them to know the difference between opioids and opiates, and all the different prescription drugs that fall in this category. I would rather the police force focus it's energy on training and dealing with violent crime.
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Old 07-06-2018, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Port Charlotte, FL - Pasadena, People's Republic of Maryland
2,953 posts, read 2,850,608 times
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I know three families that lost adult children to drug overdoses. Not a single one started their drug use because of a Dr. prescribing pain killers. The only reason that drug companies are being blamed is because the politicians need a bad guy and that bad guy can't possibly be the drug user themselves. They're too weak to go after the smugglers and dealers, so the drug companies get the blame.
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Old 07-06-2018, 06:53 AM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
58,182 posts, read 40,994,056 times
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Quote:
In brief, while prescription opioids continue to play a part in the crisis, illicit opioids such as heroin and illicitly manufactured fentanyl, not prescription opioids and overprescribing, are currently the driving forces behind the increase in unintentional overdose deaths in the United States
This quote appears little but a CYA piece for BigPharma. While illicit opioids may well be "the driving forces behind the increase in unintentional overdose deaths" it makes no mention of the role legal opioids may play in initiating addictions that may eventually lead people to seek illicit opioids when their prescriptions can't be renewed and they find 'street' drugs far less expensive than the prescription ones.

Maybe I missed it and if so please point it out but I'd like to see data listing opioid deaths along with data indicating what the initial exposure to opiods was for those who OD'ed. Something definitely seems off when we see stories of wholesalers shipping millions of doses of opioids to towns of a few hundred.
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Old 07-06-2018, 06:54 AM
Status: "What's 100 minus 48 plus 5?" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Posting from my space yacht.
8,044 posts, read 3,153,252 times
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I thought prescription opioids were typically the gateway opioid, and when people got cut off from their prescriptions that would be when they went to black market opioids or other hard drugs? People get cut off from their prescriptions earlier than they used to so you don't see as many overdoses from that, but that means they get pushed on to the unregulated black market drugs more quickly and may be more likely to overdose from those.


If there is an agenda here it is not on the part of law enforcement. Private prisons may have their hand in it but I'd say the main culprit would be drug developers and manufacturers who buy off a lot of politicians to make sure marijuana, which they do not get profits from, remains illegal.
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Old 07-06-2018, 06:58 AM
Status: "What's 100 minus 48 plus 5?" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Posting from my space yacht.
8,044 posts, read 3,153,252 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikMal View Post
I know three families that lost adult children to drug overdoses. Not a single one started their drug use because of a Dr. prescribing pain killers. The only reason that drug companies are being blamed is because the politicians need a bad guy and that bad guy can't possibly be the drug user themselves. They're too weak to go after the smugglers and dealers, so the drug companies get the blame.
They may not have started from the prescriptions themselves, but those who did start off that way are driving the market. I know when I was a young Bully it was a lot tougher to get many of these drugs on the black market, and you had to go to the real crappy neighborhoods and sketchy dealers to get anything stronger than weed or maybe coke. Now those drugs are everywhere.
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Old 07-06-2018, 07:05 AM
 
10,604 posts, read 2,705,869 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikMal View Post
I know three families that lost adult children to drug overdoses. Not a single one started their drug use because of a Dr. prescribing pain killers. The only reason that drug companies are being blamed is because the politicians need a bad guy and that bad guy can't possibly be the drug user themselves. They're too weak to go after the smugglers and dealers, so the drug companies get the blame.
I thought the big pharma companies were too powerful or influential for govt to come in and target some of its most popular drugs?

After all, when something has such a high street markup as these drugs do, who in their right mind would seek to make them harder to obtain? LOL Usually its the opposite, make them easier to get.
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Old 07-06-2018, 07:06 AM
 
23,103 posts, read 12,300,165 times
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The over prescription of pain meds is ONE aspect of the crisis...that's all.

I haven't found the MSM or certain elected officials to say it is the only factor.

The biggest factor is probable the inexpensive costs to produce fentanyl
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Old 07-06-2018, 07:06 AM
 
13,139 posts, read 4,481,605 times
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I've been saying this for years. Of all the people I know of within my circle of friends/family that OD'd on opioids, which is about 7 so far, not a single one was ever prescribed a single thing and they ALL OD'd on heroin.
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Old 07-06-2018, 07:07 AM
 
Location: Barrington
45,840 posts, read 34,049,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikMal View Post
I know three families that lost adult children to drug overdoses. Not a single one started their drug use because of a Dr. prescribing pain killers. The only reason that drug companies are being blamed is because the politicians need a bad guy and that bad guy can't possibly be the drug user themselves. They're too weak to go after the smugglers and dealers, so the drug companies get the blame.
The typical heroin addict is a white male in his early 20’s with a history of recreational drug use.

So long as there is an insatiable demand for drugs, drugs will find their way into the US.

Treatment does not cure addiction. It tends to be the pause that refreshes. Most relapse.

I have volunteered on and off at a hospital detox/ treatment facility for years. It’s a revolving door.

Drugs rewire the brain to protect and sustain addiction.
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