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View Poll Results: Who do you consider "your people"
All Americans 74 33.33%
Americans who share your religion 2 0.90%
Americans who share your ethnicity/race 13 5.86%
Americans who share your ethnicity AND religion 6 2.70%
People of your religion anywhere in the world 1 0.45%
People of your ethnicity/race anywhere in the world 14 6.31%
People of your state regardless of background 4 1.80%
People of your region (South, New England, etc) regardless of background 9 4.05%
People of your immediate community regardless of background 12 5.41%
Other 87 39.19%
Voters: 222. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-21-2018, 06:35 AM
 
Location: The analog world
15,558 posts, read 8,734,436 times
Reputation: 20856

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
When ever I here somebody in casual conversation say "my people" or "your people", I assume they are talking about my family or theirs.

It's from a 1960's or 1970's R&B song, but I don't know the name or who sings it, but the singer is referring to his family:

"It don't matter what my people might say,
I know I'm gonna love you any ol' way".

I have also heard work supervisors refer to the people he or she is in charge of as "my people".
That's a good point. In my worldview, "your people" is an antiquated phrase used to determine pedigree, as in "Who are your people?" asked of a new suitor who is meeting the family for the first time. I'm thinking of a social class, now long outmoded, that concerned itself with things like finishing schools and comings out. It brings to mind a different time and place ruled by people who were at the top of the social heap and who were determined to stay there by ensuring proper matches for their children. I'm not saying that assortive mating doesn't still exist, but the days of Granny standing at the door with a dubious look on her face and demanding a run down of a young man's aristocratic credentials before allowing him to join the family in the dining room are long over. Today, Granny would have Googled on her smartphone him weeks ago.
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Old 09-21-2018, 06:43 AM
 
31,471 posts, read 14,559,147 times
Reputation: 8349
Quote:
Originally Posted by glass_of_merlot View Post
Im a citizen since 2013. So I guess yes. I,am an American now!
I'm born and raised is Sweden. Married a GI.

So now that you're a U.S. citizen then your culture is American and your people are Americans, right?
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Old 09-21-2018, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Arizona
5,334 posts, read 5,696,665 times
Reputation: 7023
Quote:
Originally Posted by Retroit View Post
I’ve never used the term “my people”.
Ditto.
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Old 09-21-2018, 08:21 AM
 
Location: 60630
11,626 posts, read 17,035,814 times
Reputation: 10632
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Dark Enlightenment View Post
The culture you grew up is pretty much yours for life. You changed your citizenship but you're still culturally Swedish, aren't you? I've probably lived in Japan for longer than you've lived in America, but I'm definitely not culturally Japanese, couldn't be even if I wanted to.
I lived in The USA since November 2000. I have not been around any Swedish people since I moved here other than family visiting from Sweden and going back to Sweden every other year.
So I actually feel pretty Americanized. However, I have kept much of my culture from home, mixed it with my husbands culture. We are not religious at all, but we celebrate Christmas.
I have lived in Oklahoma, Tennessee , Mississippi, Washington and now Illinois. So I have truly been exposed to all kinds of American cultures.
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Old 09-21-2018, 08:22 AM
 
Location: 60630
11,626 posts, read 17,035,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldglory View Post
So now that you're a U.S. citizen then your culture is American and your people are Americans, right?
Americans who share my values, traditions etc. Those are the people I want to be around.
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Old 09-21-2018, 02:03 PM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
2,563 posts, read 1,729,915 times
Reputation: 4344
Quote:
Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
That's a good point. In my worldview, "your people" is an antiquated phrase used to determine pedigree, as in "Who are your people?" asked of a new suitor who is meeting the family for the first time. I'm thinking of a social class, now long outmoded, that concerned itself with things like finishing schools and comings out. It brings to mind a different time and place.
.
"My people" are my parents, brothers, sisters, grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins and 2nd and 3rd cousins. That's what it means to me. But I also understand it can be interpreted in different ways by differently peopke .

Personally, I don't think the terms " your people" or "my people" are necessarily offensive or comes from a bad place.

It's when somebody uses the term "you people" is when the water gets muddy and people tend to step in it and once they step in it, it's very difficult to get out of and fully recover from. Whether true or not, it will always be a stain on that persons reputation.

Ross Perot blew his chances of becoming President in 1992 when he used the term "you people" in a speech he was giving at an NAACP banquet, I believe it was in either Nashville or New Orleans. I don't believe he meant to be offensive to anybody. I just think he didn't think know any better. That's the way many people talked from his generation. But the moment those words came out of his mouth, the crowd turned on him and the networks had a field day with it. Perot appologized, but it didn't do any good because too many people refused to accept it. I thought he got a raw deal. He was not an experienced politician. I think everybody deserves a 2nd chance.

I really don't think Ross Perot intended to insult anybody. He knew he had nothing to gain by offending black people. But enough people, both black and white, took offense that it pretty much ruined Ross Perot's short-lived political career. He had to withdrawl from the race, shortly there after. He was riding a big wave of popularity in the polls before he made that blunder.

I think it will go down in history that Ross Perot was one of the 1st victims of a political correct society that has played a major role in the great divide of this country is currently experiencing.
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Old 09-21-2018, 02:30 PM
 
11,646 posts, read 3,242,043 times
Reputation: 3567
Quote:
Originally Posted by glass_of_merlot View Post
I lived in The USA since November 2000. I have not been around any Swedish people since I moved here other than family visiting from Sweden and going back to Sweden every other year.
So I actually feel pretty Americanized. However, I have kept much of my culture from home, mixed it with my husbands culture. We are not religious at all, but we celebrate Christmas.
I have lived in Oklahoma, Tennessee , Mississippi, Washington and now Illinois. So I have truly been exposed to all kinds of American cultures.
My theory is a northwestern European easily and quickly and more thoroughly can assimilate to American culture. The further out you go from there particularly outside of Europe, it becomes a more iffy proposition.
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Old 09-21-2018, 02:33 PM
 
11,646 posts, read 3,242,043 times
Reputation: 3567
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
.
Ross Perot blew his chances of becoming President in 1992 when he used the term "you people" in a speech he was giving at an NAACP banquet, I believe it was in either Nashville or New Orleans. I don't believe he meant to be offensive to anybody. I just think he didn't think know any better.
Ah yeah the beauty of PC becoming established in the early 1990s.
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Old 09-21-2018, 02:41 PM
 
31,471 posts, read 14,559,147 times
Reputation: 8349
Quote:
Originally Posted by glass_of_merlot View Post
I lived in The USA since November 2000. I have not been around any Swedish people since I moved here other than family visiting from Sweden and going back to Sweden every other year.
So I actually feel pretty Americanized. However, I have kept much of my culture from home, mixed it with my husbands culture. We are not religious at all, but we celebrate Christmas.
I have lived in Oklahoma, Tennessee , Mississippi, Washington and now Illinois. So I have truly been exposed to all kinds of American cultures.

America doesn't have different identifying cultures. Our de facto language is English and anything celebrated, practiced or cuisines eaten are all done in every state. There are however, minority cultures living among us but they don't identify us as a nation.
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Old 09-22-2018, 05:37 PM
 
536 posts, read 343,921 times
Reputation: 2986
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Dark Enlightenment View Post
Good for you. I'm surprised to hear that autistic people are able to bond together as a group though. I thought not being able to connect with others was a defining trait of autism.
That belief by "the experts" is what kept Autistic people apart from each other for so many years. I am the founder of AutHaven retreat, the first by/for autistic retreat put together solely by Autistic people that is affordable by all[ over half attendees are on full scholarship, often with airfare as well] So, when people attended who had not had much interaction with other Autistic people, so many of them had a reaction of "OMG, I finally found others from my planet!" What we all discovered is that while we do have difficulties with social abilities with non-Autistic people, we ussually have great social skills with other Autistic people.

AutHaven retreat is taking a break for a few years, because people kept saying "Why can we only feel okay being who we are for 4 days a year?" So, now we are working on AutHaven Community. We have huge plans, but right now there are only 6 people living here. We bought a slip of land adjacant to this house, and we are hoping to triple our size in the next 4 years or so. 85% of 'high functioning Autistic people do not work. We are working on changing that. And the average lifespan is 30 years less than non-Autistic people [which makes me an ANCIENT Autistic woman]in great part because of extraordinarily high suicide rate.

We are having a board meeting the first week in October [ the meeting is for an entire week because board members live all over the country and Canada. I am HOPING that one of our people with strong I.T. skills will build our website at that time so that people can learn more about us.
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