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Old 05-08-2019, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
18,292 posts, read 8,240,161 times
Reputation: 10675

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 4dognight View Post
Using a "study" course to perv over babies is disgusting.
Please explain how the news story in the OP demonstrates "perving".

Seems like you are saying that college students shouldn't study human sexual development. So when, IYO, is it OK for people to learn about human sexual development? Remember this is a course designed to help people answer children's questions about sex. Do you think that children deserve honest, knowledgeable answers to these questions? Or do you prefer that the people answering these questions (1) lie, or (2) give ignorant answers?

Last edited by jacqueg; 05-08-2019 at 10:22 PM..
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Old 05-08-2019, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
18,292 posts, read 8,240,161 times
Reputation: 10675
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiociolliscalves View Post
No need to translate, compadre! The "crapola" here are all the underlying premises behind this academic quackery and pseudoscience. Take for example, the underlying premise that if children of a certain age are curious about something, adults should tell them about it. Why again is this so? I can rattle off all sorts of things that a child might be curious about that are inappropriate as subjects of discussion at that age. Where precisely is the evidence that telling children about "BJs" or gays leads to more positive "outcomes?" Similarly, where is the evidence that teaching your 5/6 year-old what "the F word" means leads to more positive outcomes?

And, man, I wonder what the prof's opinion is on the questions listed for adolescents? I wonder how the prof would answer the question about premarital sex and I wonder if that opinion is presented as the correct one?

Here's a fun counterfactual. Let's pretend a prof created a class in which the underlying premise was that frank discussions about intercourse and homosexuality should be withheld from children until they are teenagers. And instead of the current topics for adolescents on that list, it included questions like, "In what ways does premarital sex harm young people" or "Is it ever too late to return to abstinence?" Would such a course be tolerated, keeping in mind that it is no less scientific than the actual one (and probably more scientific).

Perhaps instead of orienting the social "sciences" and humanities towards advocacy and subjective "lived experiences," all these disciplines would be better served by pursuing truth, regardless where that takes them?
Funny. I think that's exactly what this course is doing, and that you are objecting to it.

Now I'm pretty sure that the collective "we" is far from knowing everything there is to know about human sexual development. But the question is what our current state of knowledge is and how to best answer children's questions in ways they can understand without lying to them or putting them off with some vague excuse about how they're not old enough yet. Because, believe me, if a kid is curious about stuff s/he hears on the news or something someone said or something s/he reads in the bible, s/he is gonna keep asking people until s/he gets a satisfying answer. And if you are someone who has put that kid off with vague or unsatisfying answers - s/he's going to stop asking you and listen to someone else.

Last edited by jacqueg; 05-08-2019 at 10:20 PM..
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Old 05-08-2019, 11:00 PM
 
Location: Upstate NY
35,563 posts, read 10,531,898 times
Reputation: 33684
Quote:
Originally Posted by heart84 View Post
There is a really sick and evil agenda against children in this country right now. Some of the more extreme SJW types are all about sexualizing children and making them question their "identity." Better watch out what your kids are being indoctrinated with at school.........


Exactly. And this garbage is no "Human Sexuality" study.

Thinking people know that infants are not sexual beings. An infant does not experience sexual pleasure. What the hell is next? Perv men who've done the unthinkable to their infant daughters, claiming that they enjoyed it?

What a crock of baloney.
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Old 05-08-2019, 11:31 PM
 
1,579 posts, read 300,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jacqueg View Post
Funny. I think that's exactly what this course is doing, and that you are objecting to it.

Now I'm pretty sure that the collective "we" is far from knowing everything there is to know about human sexual development. But the question is what our current state of knowledge is and how to best answer children's questions in ways they can understand without lying to them or putting them off with some vague excuse about how they're not old enough yet. Because, believe me, if a kid is curious about stuff s/he hears on the news or something someone said or something s/he reads in the bible, s/he is gonna keep asking people until s/he gets a satisfying answer. And if you are someone who has put that kid off with vague or unsatisfying answers - s/he's going to stop asking you and listen to someone else.
You think children commonly ask parents or other adults what a "BJ" or ask their parents to explain what "gay" means? Where is any indication that this is true? Just like in other times, those sorts of things are addressed among peers. Your argument, and the argument of activists seems to be, "Well, better to hear the truth from parents rather than from peers." Once again, let's examine the premises behind these beliefs. One premise is that the information kids are getting from other kids on subjects like these is erroneous and that adults clear these things up. No, I trust that most of the time, peers convey a sufficient understanding of what those particular words mean. We don't have many children in our society unaware of what "gay" means. Another premise is that the role of the parent is to be a dispenser of information in these cases. No, the main role of parents in these situations is to dispense moral guidance. It's a quite simple dialogue in these situations: "I understand you've thought about these things and probably discussed them with your friends. That's normal, but the fact is that these are things that simply aren't appropriate at your age. As you get older, we'll talk about them if you want to talk about them." If you wish to classify that as "vague and unsatisfying (perish the thought!)," that's fine. For most kids with capable parents, that really is a "satisfying" response to kids and they understand that this isn't a subject they should be talking about at that age. Now, for many, it's not, but that's a result of the incompetence and failed parenting strategies of their folks, not a problem with neglecting to have explicit conversations about "BJs" and homosexuality. And, again, there is the premise that children are harmed by not having explicit conversations about these things. Where is the evidence of this?
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Old 05-09-2019, 01:01 AM
 
4,561 posts, read 898,523 times
Reputation: 1921
Off-topic: it is important to teach kids to say "no" when an older person touches them or tries to touch them in their private parts.
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Old 05-09-2019, 01:37 AM
 
Location: Itinerant
6,263 posts, read 4,179,568 times
Reputation: 4759
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delahanty View Post
Thinking people know that infants are not sexual beings. An infant does not experience sexual pleasure. What the hell is next? Perv men who've done the unthinkable to their infant daughters, claiming that they enjoyed it.
I've been bashing the bishop since I was around 4 years old, probably earlier, memory is hazy that far back. You saying that I wasn't sexually actualizing at that age? If I was wouldn't that make me a sexual being? AFAIK I've never been subject to child sexual abuse either.

Now that doesn't mean that infants, juveniles, etc. could be experiencing sexual congress with adults, but it does mean that some if not all pre-majority aged kids are sexual beings.

You can recognize someone is a sexual being without any desire or intent from engaging with them. Pretty much every guy is a sexual being, I don't engage sexually with men. How difficult was that?
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Old 05-09-2019, 05:05 AM
 
Location: New York Area
15,944 posts, read 6,276,213 times
Reputation: 12383
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eumaois View Post
#Blacklabsmatter (Labs are the best dog breed, in my opinion).
I love that hashtag but Labs are among the so-called "vicious dog" breeds. Incorrigible and dangerous.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eumaois View Post
On topic, who in their right mind approves of these college courses? It's one thing that kids are being "indoctrinated" about their sexual identity but essentially teaching a college course on something Pedo Bear would approve of is really pushing it (pun intended).
I graduated college in1979. Those exact courses were not yet in but the basic idea was. I agree that children should not be educated into gender dysphoria. Trans-species was hard enough.
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Old 05-09-2019, 06:29 AM
 
5,305 posts, read 1,068,446 times
Reputation: 2960
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacqueg View Post
So studying human sexual development is disgusting and sick? Oooooookkkkkkaaaayyyy...
What about the word INFANT don't you get?
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Old 05-09-2019, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Missouri, USA
4,372 posts, read 2,981,848 times
Reputation: 2033
Default You people are like cartoon parodies of yourselves.

*This is a psychology course. The part of the psychology course that deals with adolescent and child sexuality is 3 days long 3 days long, in a four month long course! This is a level 400 psychology course. It's not something freshmen engineers are going to be diving into, most likely. You people, some of whom I suspect have been genetically engineered in Chinese labs as counter-capitalist propaganda, or who are employed by Bernie Sanders as anti-right wing propaganda, are going bonkers and thinking that NAMBLA is teaching a class on how to most stealthily collect pictures of baby genitalia because of a 3 day segment of a four month long class

Here are the learning objectives in the course:

1 Discuss examples that demonstrate how infants of both sexes are born with the capacity for sexual pleasure and response.

2 Discuss common features of sexual development that occur during childhood, including discussion of the responses of parents and other adult caregivers

3 Define adolescence, and explain childhood and adolescent sexuality in Western society.

4 Define puberty and describe the physical changes that occur for males and females.

5 Describe the changes that occur in adolescent friendships during puberty.

6 Discuss the double standard as it affects adolescent social and sexual behavior.

7 Describe the incidence and frequency of masturbation among male and female adolescents.

8 Define noncoital sexual expression and discuss how common it is among adolescent females and males. Discuss the phenomenon of sexting and other online sexual activities and the implications of each.

9 Explain how likely ongoing sexual relationships are among adolescents.

10 Summarize what the research reveals regarding the incidence of and reasons for intercourse, including multi-person sex, among adolescents. What factors are related to early or late initiation of intercourse? Include a discussion of the racial and ethnic differences regarding intercourse.

11 Assess how common same-sex contact may be during adolescence and explain how this may reflect a transitory, experimental phase of sexual development, or how it may be indicative of a homosexual orientation. Discuss antigay bullying.

12 Examine the impact of HIV/AIDS on teenage sexual behavior.

13 Summarize available research and statistical data regarding various aspects of adolescent pregnancy, including its impact on teenagers and their infants.
14 Discuss how an adolescent mother’s decision to keep her child may affect her education, financial status, and the life of her child.

15 Explain how prevalent contraceptive use is among adolescents and what factors affect contraceptive use on a regular basis.

16 Discuss factors that may contribute to differences in teen pregnancy rates.

17 Describe some general guidelines that the authors suggest for reducing teenage pregnancy and evaluate the research concerning effective and ineffective methods.

18 Analyze the nature of sex education programs in schools, including the controversies surrounding them, and discuss how parents can talk to children about sex.


Aside from baby sexuality, that's all useful knowledge...and if you insist that just be swept under the rug because it's "icky" I am totally baffled by your ignorance-craving thought process. My college had a class on Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings" trilogy. If you want to halt the spread of any kind of data-related class when we're having other courses on the "Lord of the Rings," that's absurd, so far as I can tell.

Regarding the infant sexuality, so far as I can tell when that sort of thing is mentioned people are not referring to adult sexuality, but rather to its precursors. So...so far the only thing that even might be worth getting upset about is one phrase in a three day long segment of a four month course that might be not the best way of describing things...if it's even not the best way of describing things. I don't know whether it is or not.

And that's assuming they're not just discussing Sigmond Freud's view of infant sexuality, which they may very well be doing.

Yeah...clearly this course was invented by NAMBLA, lol. Moving on.
__________________________________________________ _________________

Quote:
Originally Posted by chiociolliscalves View Post
No need to translate, compadre! The "crapola" here are all the underlying premises behind this academic quackery and pseudoscience. Take for example, the underlying premise that if children of a certain age are curious about something, adults should tell them about it. Why again is this so? I can rattle off all sorts of things that a child might be curious about that are inappropriate as subjects of discussion at that age. Where precisely is the evidence that telling children about "BJs" or gays leads to more positive "outcomes?" Similarly, where is the evidence that teaching your 5/6 year-old what "the F word" means leads to more positive outcomes?

And, man, I wonder what the prof's opinion is on the questions listed for adolescents? I wonder how the prof would answer the question about premarital sex and I wonder if that opinion is presented as the correct one?

It sounds like they're asking students to think about whether or not the questions of children should be answered...not insisting like you want to do with your weird below idea about a course that suggests that sex before marriage is a negative thing...which it's not, inherently.

I find the fact that you appear to see that as propaganda unnerving. From the lesson plan:

• Who do you think taught your parents about sexuality? Are your parents well-informed, misinformed, or under-informed? How comfortable are you in talking with your parents about sexuality? How comfortable do you think your parents are in talking with you about this topic?

• What information do you wish you had about sex as an adolescent? What would be different if you knew back then what you know now?


I can already think of reasons why telling children about gays, at least those nearing puberty, might be a good thing...it's because homosexuality appears to be in-changeable in at least some people. If a kid turns out to be one of those people, it'd probably be better for them to have heard about that sort of thing beforehand...and that in some people's it's permanent, and that most people have dominant attractions to the opposite sex.

I can also imagine reasons why telling kids about BJ's, those nearing puberty, might not be a bad idea either. It's because you can't get pregnant from non-vaginal intercourse. Any kind of sexuality a parent tells a child about is going to have potential positive affects. It all might have negative repercussions emotionally...but so long as it's fact, I can't see it damaging kids over the long term unless they get showed gay porn or something. How is just a bit of wider knowledge about the world going to traumatize anyone? I'm wondering if "just phrase things carefully" might cover all that. No matter how parents discuss that stuff, there will be pros and cons.

Quote:
Here's a fun counterfactual. Let's pretend a prof created a class in which the underlying premise was that frank discussions about intercourse and homosexuality should be withheld from children until they are teenagers. And instead of the current topics for adolescents on that list, it included questions like, "In what ways does premarital sex harm young people" or "Is it ever too late to return to abstinence?" Would such a course be tolerated, keeping in mind that it is no less scientific than the actual one (and probably more scientific).

Perhaps instead of orienting the social "sciences" and humanities towards advocacy and subjective "lived experiences," all these disciplines would be better served by pursuing truth, regardless where that takes them?
Asking questions in a psychology course like "In what ways does premarital sex harm young people" would make no sense whatsoever. Whether or not someone is married has zero effect, whatsoever, on whether or not they'll be harmed by intercourse. That's because marriage can mean a thousand different things to a thousand different people. On the other hand, using the term "premarital sex" can be problematic, because "marriage" has no inherent meaning and if we only focus on discouraging "premarital sex" we're accomplishing nothing except for maybe encouraging people to get married before they're ready...for the sex.

I have no idea what purpose would be served by asking people "Is it ever too late to return to abstinence." It would seem like just discussing sexuality in general and discussing its affects would make that question obsolete in every way.

__________________________________________________ ___________________________

moving on

Quote:
Originally Posted by DRob4JC View Post
Normalization of this behavior will continue to creep forward... it will be dealt with at some point.
Normalization of what behavior? Do you mean the behavior of pondering the hazards of adult/child intercourse and teen intercourse? That seems to be a significant part of this lesson plan.

From the "Discussion Questions" segment of the lesson plan:

• What are the risks or special considerations that should be addressed for contraceptive use in adolescence? Some examples may be the long-term effects of birth-control pills and the misuse of contraceptives.
• Discuss why teens are at risk for malnutrition during pregnancy. What are some of the extra nutritional requirements for teens that are pregnant?

• Adolescents are physically capable of sex but often cognitively immature. Discuss some of the limits on adolescent thinking (for instance, poor future planning skills, casual sex) and how these limits can be overcome.

• Recently, several “reality” television programs have focused on teen pregnancy. How accurate are these shows? Do you think they encourage or discourage teen pregnancy?



This is from the "guest speakers" section:

• A representative from the local public health agency could discuss community outreach programs for teens, as well as provide current local statistics on teen pregnancy, sexually transmitted infection rates, and other issues.

• A representative from a local HIV/AIDS organization could discuss prevention programs for adolescents and provide information about local testing programs
__________________________________________________ _________________________

the 3 day segment of this psychology course appears to deal, pretty much entirely, with important issues
related to childhood sexuality that I could see as useful to parents and child psychologists. It is by no means a course on how to most stealthily take photographs of baby genitalia.

Here's their proposed list of guest speakers:

A representative from the local public health agency could discuss community outreach programs for teens, as well as provide current local statistics on teen pregnancy, sexually transmitted infection rates, and other issues.

• A representative from a local HIV/AIDS organization could discuss prevention programs for adolescents and provide information about local testing programs.

• A school board member could discuss the political pressures faced by elected officials in developing and approving a health care curriculum that includes sex education information.

• A preschool or kindergarten teacher could discuss appropriate ways of handling young children’s sexual behavior.

• A social worker who works with teen parents or pregnant teens could discuss the issues, current community programs, and help needed in the community.

• A health or sex-education instructor from a local elementary or junior/senior high school could talk about who decides what can be taught, what he or she wishes could be taught, and what questions are typically asked.

• A representative from Planned Parenthood could discuss the services they provide to members of the community.

• A developmental psychologist could be invited to discuss child sexual development, normal behaviors and appropriate parental responses.

• A history professor could be invited to discuss historical perspectives on masturbation and its prevention.


__________________________________________________ ________

Here's their full list of proposed discussion questions:

• At what age should an adolescent be considered responsible to make decisions about sexual behavior, including contraception and protection from STIs? What are the advantages and disadvantages of less or more conservative approaches?

• How or why is the term “premarital sex” problematic, as it pertains to measuring adolescent sexual behavior? If students need prompting, have them consider the following: it excludes a great deal of sexual behavior; it presumes that all or most people will marry; and it excludes those who, by law, cannot marry.

• Who do you think taught your parents about sexuality? Are your parents well-informed, misinformed, or under-informed? How comfortable are you in talking with your parents about sexuality? How comfortable do you think your parents are in talking with you about this topic?

• What information do you wish you had about sex as an adolescent? What would be different if you knew back then what you know now?

• What is the influence of the peer group on adolescent sexual behavior? Would your behavior have been different if your peer group were different?

• How would you respond as a parent if your adolescent “came out” to you as being gay or lesbian?

• What are the risks or special considerations that should be addressed for contraceptive use in adolescence? Some examples may be the long-term effects of birth-control pills and the misuse of contraceptives.
• Discuss why teens are at risk for malnutrition during pregnancy. What are some of the extra nutritional requirements for teens that are pregnant?

• Adolescents are physically capable of sex but often cognitively immature. Discuss some of the limits on adolescent thinking (for instance, poor future planning skills, casual sex) and how these limits can be overcome.

• Recently, several “reality” television programs have focused on teen pregnancy. How accurate are these shows? Do you think they encourage or discourage teen pregnancy?

None of that stuff is even remotely disturbing.
__________________________________________________ ________________________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacqueg View Post
So human sexuality should not be studied?

I'd say many of the posters in this thread do need to have their social norms challenged. Since apparently we can't even talk about the facts regarding sexual development without fear and horror.
I don't even think it seems like they are challenging social norms much, if any. These will be psychology students and maybe some other categories of people who might find this useful - parents and such.
__________________________________________________ __________________________________

And here's the weirdest part:

Field Trip: Take the class to a local elementary school playground, or ask permission for a few of your students to attend various school playgrounds, preschools, or daycare centers during recess to observe behaviors of children. Ask students to note interactions between same-sex and mixed-sex groups. Which group was more frequent? Which behaviors were most frequent? What kind of touching did children engage in? What about teasing behaviors? Were there any overtly sexual interactions? What was the age range of the children being observed? Have students write a report comparing their observations with information in the text.

However, the students would be supervised and I'd probably prefer child psychologists who have studied kids in this way than those who have not.

Moving on
__________________________________________________ _________________________________

Quote:
Originally Posted by DRob4JC View Post
Normalization of this behavior will continue to creep forward... it will be dealt with at some point.
Quote:
Originally Posted by heart84 View Post
There is a really sick and evil agenda against children in this country right now. Some of the more extreme SJW types are all about sexualizing children and making them question their "identity." Better watch out what your kids are being indoctrinated with at school.........
Quote:
Originally Posted by saltine View Post
Pedophilia- lefties desired new social norm.
Sick mofo’s
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eumaois View Post
#Blacklabsmatter (Labs are the best dog breed, in my opinion). On topic, who in their right mind approves of these college courses? It's one thing that kids are being "indoctrinated" about their sexual identity but essentially teaching a college course on something Pedo Bear would approve of is really pushing it (pun intended).
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiociolliscalves View Post
They've created a euphemism for such people: MAPs. That stands for Minor Attracted Persons.

Now think about it for a second. You have folks who already argue that other groups are "born that way," and thus their behaviors are unavoidable. If they believe "MAPs" are "born that way," how can we hold them accountable for something inherent in them?
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4dognight View Post
Who gives a sh*t and why should there be a study?

It damned pornographic pedophilia getting their jollies and calling it a "study".

Mothers have their babies ripped from their bodies in pieces so that they won't be saddled with them why should we expect any better of strangers who call themselves teachers and professors?

Disgusting and sick!!


AHAHAHAHAHAAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHAHAHAHAAAAAHA HAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHAHAHAAHAHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHA HAHHAHAHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHA

You people think a university child psychology course is the equivalent of a NAMBLA seminar on how to most stealthily take pictures of baby genitalia
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Old 05-09-2019, 06:45 AM
Status: "What's 100 minus 48 plus 5?" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Posting from my space yacht.
8,070 posts, read 3,165,147 times
Reputation: 14567
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clintone View Post
*This is a psychology course. The part of the psychology course that deals with adolescent and child sexuality is 3 days long 3 days long, in a four month long course! This is a level 400 psychology course. It's not something freshmen engineers are going to be diving into, most likely. You people, some of whom I suspect have been genetically engineered in Chinese labs as counter-capitalist propaganda, or who are employed by Bernie Sanders as anti-right wing propaganda, are going bonkers and thinking that NAMBLA is teaching a class on how to most stealthily collect pictures of baby genitalia because of a 3 day segment of a four month long class

Here are the learning objectives in the course:

1 Discuss examples that demonstrate how infants of both sexes are born with the capacity for sexual pleasure and response.

2 Discuss common features of sexual development that occur during childhood, including discussion of the responses of parents and other adult caregivers

3 Define adolescence, and explain childhood and adolescent sexuality in Western society.

4 Define puberty and describe the physical changes that occur for males and females.

5 Describe the changes that occur in adolescent friendships during puberty.

6 Discuss the double standard as it affects adolescent social and sexual behavior.

7 Describe the incidence and frequency of masturbation among male and female adolescents.

8 Define noncoital sexual expression and discuss how common it is among adolescent females and males. Discuss the phenomenon of sexting and other online sexual activities and the implications of each.

9 Explain how likely ongoing sexual relationships are among adolescents.

10 Summarize what the research reveals regarding the incidence of and reasons for intercourse, including multi-person sex, among adolescents. What factors are related to early or late initiation of intercourse? Include a discussion of the racial and ethnic differences regarding intercourse.

11 Assess how common same-sex contact may be during adolescence and explain how this may reflect a transitory, experimental phase of sexual development, or how it may be indicative of a homosexual orientation. Discuss antigay bullying.

12 Examine the impact of HIV/AIDS on teenage sexual behavior.

13 Summarize available research and statistical data regarding various aspects of adolescent pregnancy, including its impact on teenagers and their infants.
14 Discuss how an adolescent mother’s decision to keep her child may affect her education, financial status, and the life of her child.

15 Explain how prevalent contraceptive use is among adolescents and what factors affect contraceptive use on a regular basis.

16 Discuss factors that may contribute to differences in teen pregnancy rates.

17 Describe some general guidelines that the authors suggest for reducing teenage pregnancy and evaluate the research concerning effective and ineffective methods.

18 Analyze the nature of sex education programs in schools, including the controversies surrounding them, and discuss how parents can talk to children about sex.


Aside from baby sexuality, that's all useful knowledge...and if you insist that just be swept under the rug because it's "icky" I am totally baffled by your ignorance-craving thought process. My college had a class on Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings" trilogy. If you want to halt the spread of any kind of data-related class when we're having other courses on the "Lord of the Rings," that's absurd, so far as I can tell.

Regarding the infant sexuality, so far as I can tell when that sort of thing is mentioned people are not referring to adult sexuality, but rather to its precursors. So...so far the only thing that even might be worth getting upset about is one phrase in a three day long segment of a four month course that might be not the best way of describing things...if it's even not the best way of describing things. I don't know whether it is or not.

And that's assuming they're not just discussing Sigmond Freud's view of infant sexuality, which they may very well be doing.

Yeah...clearly this course was invented by NAMBLA, lol. Moving on.
__________________________________________________ _________________




It sounds like they're asking students to think about whether or not the questions of children should be answered...not insisting like you want to do with your weird below idea about a course that suggests that sex before marriage is a negative thing...which it's not, inherently.

I find the fact that you appear to see that as propaganda unnerving. From the lesson plan:

• Who do you think taught your parents about sexuality? Are your parents well-informed, misinformed, or under-informed? How comfortable are you in talking with your parents about sexuality? How comfortable do you think your parents are in talking with you about this topic?

• What information do you wish you had about sex as an adolescent? What would be different if you knew back then what you know now?


I can already think of reasons why telling children about gays, at least those nearing puberty, might be a good thing...it's because homosexuality appears to be in-changeable in at least some people. If a kid turns out to be one of those people, it'd probably be better for them to have heard about that sort of thing beforehand...and that in some people's it's permanent, and that most people have dominant attractions to the opposite sex.

I can also imagine reasons why telling kids about BJ's, those nearing puberty, might not be a bad idea either. It's because you can't get pregnant from non-vaginal intercourse. Any kind of sexuality a parent tells a child about is going to have potential positive affects. It all might have negative repercussions emotionally...but so long as it's fact, I can't see it damaging kids over the long term unless they get showed gay porn or something. How is just a bit of wider knowledge about the world going to traumatize anyone? I'm wondering if "just phrase things carefully" might cover all that. No matter how parents discuss that stuff, there will be pros and cons.



Asking questions in a psychology course like "In what ways does premarital sex harm young people" would make no sense whatsoever. Whether or not someone is married has zero effect, whatsoever, on whether or not they'll be harmed by intercourse. That's because marriage can mean a thousand different things to a thousand different people. On the other hand, using the term "premarital sex" can be problematic, because "marriage" has no inherent meaning and if we only focus on discouraging "premarital sex" we're accomplishing nothing except for maybe encouraging people to get married before they're ready...for the sex.

I have no idea what purpose would be served by asking people "Is it ever too late to return to abstinence." It would seem like just discussing sexuality in general and discussing its affects would make that question obsolete in every way.

__________________________________________________ ___________________________

moving on



Normalization of what behavior? Do you mean the behavior of pondering the hazards of adult/child intercourse and teen intercourse? That seems to be a significant part of this lesson plan.

From the "Discussion Questions" segment of the lesson plan:

• What are the risks or special considerations that should be addressed for contraceptive use in adolescence? Some examples may be the long-term effects of birth-control pills and the misuse of contraceptives.
• Discuss why teens are at risk for malnutrition during pregnancy. What are some of the extra nutritional requirements for teens that are pregnant?

• Adolescents are physically capable of sex but often cognitively immature. Discuss some of the limits on adolescent thinking (for instance, poor future planning skills, casual sex) and how these limits can be overcome.

• Recently, several “reality” television programs have focused on teen pregnancy. How accurate are these shows? Do you think they encourage or discourage teen pregnancy?



This is from the "guest speakers" section:

• A representative from the local public health agency could discuss community outreach programs for teens, as well as provide current local statistics on teen pregnancy, sexually transmitted infection rates, and other issues.

• A representative from a local HIV/AIDS organization could discuss prevention programs for adolescents and provide information about local testing programs
__________________________________________________ _________________________

the 3 day segment of this psychology course appears to deal, pretty much entirely, with important issues
related to childhood sexuality that I could see as useful to parents and child psychologists. It is by no means a course on how to most stealthily take photographs of baby genitalia.

Here's their proposed list of guest speakers:

A representative from the local public health agency could discuss community outreach programs for teens, as well as provide current local statistics on teen pregnancy, sexually transmitted infection rates, and other issues.

• A representative from a local HIV/AIDS organization could discuss prevention programs for adolescents and provide information about local testing programs.

• A school board member could discuss the political pressures faced by elected officials in developing and approving a health care curriculum that includes sex education information.

• A preschool or kindergarten teacher could discuss appropriate ways of handling young children’s sexual behavior.

• A social worker who works with teen parents or pregnant teens could discuss the issues, current community programs, and help needed in the community.

• A health or sex-education instructor from a local elementary or junior/senior high school could talk about who decides what can be taught, what he or she wishes could be taught, and what questions are typically asked.

• A representative from Planned Parenthood could discuss the services they provide to members of the community.

• A developmental psychologist could be invited to discuss child sexual development, normal behaviors and appropriate parental responses.

• A history professor could be invited to discuss historical perspectives on masturbation and its prevention.


__________________________________________________ ________

Here's their full list of proposed discussion questions:

• At what age should an adolescent be considered responsible to make decisions about sexual behavior, including contraception and protection from STIs? What are the advantages and disadvantages of less or more conservative approaches?

• How or why is the term “premarital sex” problematic, as it pertains to measuring adolescent sexual behavior? If students need prompting, have them consider the following: it excludes a great deal of sexual behavior; it presumes that all or most people will marry; and it excludes those who, by law, cannot marry.

• Who do you think taught your parents about sexuality? Are your parents well-informed, misinformed, or under-informed? How comfortable are you in talking with your parents about sexuality? How comfortable do you think your parents are in talking with you about this topic?

• What information do you wish you had about sex as an adolescent? What would be different if you knew back then what you know now?

• What is the influence of the peer group on adolescent sexual behavior? Would your behavior have been different if your peer group were different?

• How would you respond as a parent if your adolescent “came out” to you as being gay or lesbian?

• What are the risks or special considerations that should be addressed for contraceptive use in adolescence? Some examples may be the long-term effects of birth-control pills and the misuse of contraceptives.
• Discuss why teens are at risk for malnutrition during pregnancy. What are some of the extra nutritional requirements for teens that are pregnant?

• Adolescents are physically capable of sex but often cognitively immature. Discuss some of the limits on adolescent thinking (for instance, poor future planning skills, casual sex) and how these limits can be overcome.

• Recently, several “reality” television programs have focused on teen pregnancy. How accurate are these shows? Do you think they encourage or discourage teen pregnancy?

None of that stuff is even remotely disturbing.
__________________________________________________ ________________________________


I don't even think it seems like they are challenging social norms much, if any. These will be psychology students and maybe some other categories of people who might find this useful - parents and such.
__________________________________________________ __________________________________

And here's the weirdest part:

Field Trip: Take the class to a local elementary school playground, or ask permission for a few of your students to attend various school playgrounds, preschools, or daycare centers during recess to observe behaviors of children. Ask students to note interactions between same-sex and mixed-sex groups. Which group was more frequent? Which behaviors were most frequent? What kind of touching did children engage in? What about teasing behaviors? Were there any overtly sexual interactions? What was the age range of the children being observed? Have students write a report comparing their observations with information in the text.

However, the students would be supervised and I'd probably prefer child psychologists who have studied kids in this way than those who have not.

Moving on
__________________________________________________ _________________________________













AHAHAHAHAHAAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHAHAHAHAAAAAHA HAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHAHAHAAHAHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHA HAHHAHAHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHA

You people think a university child psychology course is the equivalent of a NAMBLA seminar on how to most stealthily take pictures of baby genitalia
Holy crap you're all in on the horny infant thing aren't you?
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