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View Poll Results: How far do you think we are from the end of cannabis prohibition?
5 years 22 38.60%
10-15 years 17 29.82%
15-30 years 7 12.28%
Never 11 19.30%
Voters: 57. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 06-07-2019, 02:18 PM
 
4,915 posts, read 1,365,521 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MJJersey View Post
Fact: pot is a gateway drug. Evidence: areas are now moving on to legalization of harder drugs after they legalized pot (among lots of other decades of evidence).
Evidence purely circumstantial. Case thrown out of court.
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Old 06-07-2019, 02:21 PM
 
3,144 posts, read 887,648 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MJJersey View Post
Fact: pot is a gateway drug. Evidence: areas are now moving on to legalization of harder drugs after they legalized pot (among lots of other decades of evidence).
That is not the definition of a gateway drug to begin with.

"Gateway" in this context refers to an individual: Will taking a drug cause someone to move on to another drug?

"Gateway drugs" has nothing to do with laws and our legal system.
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Old 06-07-2019, 02:25 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,055 posts, read 4,127,366 times
Reputation: 7699
Quote:
Originally Posted by zzzSnorlax View Post
The demographics are basically flipped with a large majority supporting legalization and a small minority still supporting prohibition.
But when it comes to our politics and laws, momentum still overwhelmingly favors prohibition.
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Old 06-07-2019, 02:26 PM
 
4,915 posts, read 1,365,521 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
But when it comes to our politics and laws, momentum still overwhelmingly favors prohibition.
Yea there is generally a 10-20 year lag time between cultural ideological shifts and legal shifts. Makes sense as it takes time for the "old guard" to cycle out.
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Old 06-07-2019, 02:29 PM
 
3,144 posts, read 887,648 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
But when it comes to our politics and laws, momentum still overwhelmingly favors prohibition.
The only reason you say that is because you have been stuck in Oklahoma for years. I understand, I lived there for over 50 years.

Like was mentioned earlier, by 2020 almost every state that has not legalized will have questions pertaining to legalization on the ballot. 33 (!) states have already legalized.

From my point of view, here at a high elevation in Colorado (no pun intended), the legalization train has left the station and now has enough momentum that it can't be stopped.

So keep your chin up...
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Old 06-07-2019, 02:29 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,055 posts, read 4,127,366 times
Reputation: 7699
Quote:
Originally Posted by zzzSnorlax View Post
I don't really think so, the problem is the enthusiasm gap in the party. Most of the people in the party who are pro legalization don't care that much about it - sure they will "support" it... but if it is not addressed they wont take their ball and go home. There is a small minority who are passionate about it.

But the subset that are anti legalization ARE passionate about it, most are older and have been propagandized and that conditioning is hard to overcome.

Thus politicians, especially in bible belt states, are doing the mental math that people in their party wont vote AGAINST them if they are anti pot, but if they are pro pot they risk getting primaried. Sort of like a political natural selection.
Agree 100%

This is why I think 15-30 years is the most likely scenario. It will probably be closer to 15, but the generation that grew up with Nancy Reagan's "Just Say No!" campaign and Jerry Falwell will need to pass the mantle of power to the next generation before there will be any major reform on this issue at the national level.

The Bible Belt will probably fall into line once its legal in the rest of the country. I'd look for "compromise" policies in states like Alabama and Mississippi that will decriminalize but still prohibit dispensaries. It will be similar to dry counties following the repeal of alcohol prohibition.
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Old 06-07-2019, 02:30 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
11,210 posts, read 6,521,472 times
Reputation: 10788
Quote:
Originally Posted by zzzSnorlax View Post
Evidence purely circumstantial. Case thrown out of court.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raddo View Post
That is not the definition of a gateway drug to begin with.

"Gateway" in this context refers to an individual: Will taking a drug cause someone to move on to another drug?

"Gateway drugs" has nothing to do with laws and our legal system.
You guys are ridiculous with your denial of reality.
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Old 06-07-2019, 02:32 PM
 
4,915 posts, read 1,365,521 times
Reputation: 2873
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJJersey View Post
You guys are ridiculous with your denial of reality.
Is the well of supporting facts and evidence already so dry that we have to resort to insults and flat assertions of victory rather than engaging with the topic? I didn't expect to scrape the bottom so quickly.
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Old 06-07-2019, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Frisco, Texas
258 posts, read 99,476 times
Reputation: 407
I believe it might be 5 or so years here in Texas. The current leadership doesn't address it too much as a whole and medical use was just recently approved on only limited conditions. But the state is too diverse to maintain that state of mind and eventually younger law makers (democrat or republican) will decriminalize it across the board when the stigma starts to fade away. As of now, it still stands for the counter culture of the 60's and the drug choice of slackers in the minds of many although that is not the reality any longer. But let's not confuse it with THE solution to societies problems and what differentiates liberals and conservatives. Just like drinking on the job or drinking while driving, there are always some disciplines that must be followed to assure a functioning society with something that essentially affects your senses. The moral issue is being over come quite efficiently, the monetary (taxation) issue will be another hurdle.
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Old 06-07-2019, 02:35 PM
 
6,387 posts, read 5,432,615 times
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Republicans thrive on telling their supporters what to fear and what is to blame for their problems, so I'd expect them to keep beating that drum about marijuana, too.

"Today's pot smokers are tomorrow's heroin users! You live in a trailer because people smoke pot!"
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