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Old 06-14-2019, 02:21 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,366 posts, read 19,297,224 times
Reputation: 8483

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Quote:
Originally Posted by itshim View Post
There definitely is, and I say that as a black man.

It's more so about class than anything else. Whenever I'm around lower income blacks, I get the "you sound white" tag; and around the more affluent, educated blacks I never get that.

lower class whites tend to give me a strange look when I talk too...the educated ones--not so much. But lower income/poor/ghetto blacks will let you know in a heart beat that "you sound white" if they think that you do. They will draw clear distinctions of race and class based on how you enunciate words combined with how you dress.

And do you consider it more of an insult or a compliment when people say you sound white? Those people saying it certainly intend to criticize you, like, you traitor!

 
Old 06-14-2019, 02:28 PM
 
Location: 20 years from now
5,510 posts, read 5,712,344 times
Reputation: 3441
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
And do you consider it more of an insult or a compliment when people say you sound white? Those people saying it certainly intend to criticize you, like, you traitor!
I'd say it's more of an insult. I'm not the standard bearer of the 'king's English' ...but the idea that because I am black and therefore should sound "ghetto" is off putting. I once got into a friendly debate with a lower income/class black woman with a few people around and she said "listen to him...he don't use slang or nothin!' in total frustration.
 
Old 06-14-2019, 02:47 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,366 posts, read 19,297,224 times
Reputation: 8483
But there ain't no ain't in it

And do you not speak like that because you don't want to (i.e. you could if you wanted to) or have you simply never learned to speak like that?

I grew up in a region that is infamous for its strong dialect (lots of grammatical and lexical deviations from the standard) and when I got into my linguistic profession, I literally had to unlearn the way I used to speak. Now my parents find it odd to speak to me as I don't speak their dialect anymore, I don't even understand some of it anymore
 
Old 06-14-2019, 05:36 PM
 
Location: USA
1,902 posts, read 2,182,300 times
Reputation: 1213
Plenty of successful blacks (which includes African Americans, African and Caribbean Immigrants) still think there is plenty of racism in society, not just downtrodden or unsuccessful African Americans like a lot of people here think. I work with blacks who make well into six figures and believe me they are not shy around me when they say they feel like they have dealt with and still deal with discrimination.

If you never heard black immigrants talk about how racists they feel society is, then they probably don't feel comfortable talking about it to YOU . As a black immigrant myself, I often find a lot of us are just not as vocal about it around whites as African Americans are. My best friend in college was Nigerian, initially when he first came over he did not think this country was racist and that African Americans complained to much. Over a decade later he changed his tune. I can't even lie there was a time where I sounded like a hardcore conservative on racial issues, until I had my N**** wake-up call in my 20's.

African Americans are not the only people who call out racism in society as many people here act. Look at England where a large portion of the black community is of Caribbean descent and they have been vocally frustrated by racism for decades. Many of the most vocal critics of American racism were foreign born themselves (Marcus Garvey, Stokley Carmicheal). Then again the sentiment here is not surprising, watch videos from the 1960's and most of the whites shown on film did not think black folks had a reason to be upset even with all the crap going on.
 
Old 06-20-2019, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn
8 posts, read 2,837 times
Reputation: 14
Six figure making Nigerian here. Please don't use us as a "model minority". There are many obstacles I've had to face and dealt with blatant racism in my journey. There is racism in education, the workforce and everyday interactions. Constantly having to validate yourself as a "good one" in society gets very annoying. Microaggressions are rampant and people do not even notice the offensive things they say.
Blacks in America have gone through something that no other race has gone through (Slavery, Jim Crow, Systematic racism, Race riots, War on drugs, red-lining, leader assassinations) and still continue to go through racism today, while having some success. When a race starts to constantly get grinded into the dirt, more dirt begins to stick.
Stop trying to use us to discredit American blacks and instead look at it as we are the minimum of what American blacks could achieve if society was not as messed up as it is.
 
Old 06-20-2019, 09:50 AM
 
468 posts, read 81,965 times
Reputation: 522
Most of everything when it comes to trying to fix the "black problem" is useless. Are you blaming black Americans for not being smart enough? I mean, didn't the slave traders steal from the least successful of the tribe? And you expect those slaves and their descendants to somehow magically become successful just because of your system?

A successful black Nigerian is still black. One or two, that's fine. Too many is trouble. I do not care how much you all (black, white, and all else) talk about it, you will not change the fact that black people cannot and will not simply blend in with whites, Asians, Hispanics, etc. I'll always wonder why people won't admit the significant incompatibility between most black people and everyone else. Goodness gracious, there are so many debates over why black people should not wear our natural hair, but then if we don't, we are ashamed of it, and if we wear it, we are militants, and then get taunted for wearing wigs! No one else of any race or ethnicity faces this sort of daily challenge and must change everything about themselves just to make it out the door in the morning.

You can call me a racist or bigot it whatever all you want, you can even call me Afrocentric, but we humans mix and mingle best when attracted to and bond through like experiences with the other person. Social/sexual attraction does not happen much at all between average black folks and other races. Of course it does with black males, but will never be as common as whites mixing with Asians, Hispanics, Native Americans, and everyone perceived as white because of physical appearance and cultural interests.
 
Old 06-20-2019, 11:24 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,366 posts, read 19,297,224 times
Reputation: 8483
I think the slave traders selected men for physical strength as they were intended to work on plantations.
Not sure what attributes women were selected for...

Yes, black people are more striking than other ethnic groups. But that is just a visual thing. If humans were blind, would racism against black people continue? I don't think so. People would not think in terms of looks, but they would distinguish people in terms of behavior towards them.
 
Old 06-20-2019, 11:43 AM
 
15,402 posts, read 7,871,041 times
Reputation: 7988
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loveshiscountry View Post
You're the only one saying that as you run from the truth. It's about their lack of education because their parents abandon them. Children from single parent families are less educated. That is a fact.

Black adults today were primarily raised in single parented homes and we are the most educated generations that our demographic (late GenX through iGen) that America has ever produced.

I know you get your willies off on OOW births and trying to claim some sort of superiority but newsflash - my mom was a single mom - I have a Master's Degree. Interestingly my dad has 4 sisters. One of his 4 sisters never married and raised a daughter completely as a single mother. My parents didn't marry when I was a child and broke up when I was 6-7 years old. Both my cousin and myself are the most educated persons in our first cousin generation on this side of my family. All 3 of my other aunts married and two divorced when their children were under the age of 18, none of their children today (they range in age from 21-38) have a college degree. My cousin who has a Master's Degree (she is younger than me) obtained both a Bachelor's and Master's before I did. She makes well over 6 figures, which is more than I make by myself. Her father was was imprisoned for the majority of her life so she actually was your abandoned fantasy. She never met him until she was an adult.

Both myself and my younger cousin are a lot alike in regards to our attitudes about being black (both of us ironically also attended/graduated from HBCUs) and the importance of a quality education and quality parenting. Due to us being reared primarily by single mothers, we also realize that having a single parent is not a detriment like you seem to believe it is. The worst of our cousins financially and educationally today are the older set (aged 32 and 38) whose parents were married their entire childhoods, they grew up solidly in a middle income household, but their parents basically didn't parent them with the type of standards that her mom and my mom did us as single mothers. Her mother IMO was a superior mom to my own mother because her mother ensured she went to the best schools in our area, got her tutors when needed, involved her in various activities, spent a lot of time with her, abstained from drinking and alcohol abuse, never brought any "step" men in her life, and scrimped and pinched to send her to the best private schools and subsequently one of the best HBCUs in this country.

We have a large amount of dedicated black single parents in black America. The successes they have produced are not overlooked by those of us not mired in stereotypes about our demographic. We are much better off than our parents' generation who were more likely to be born to parents that were married. I've told you this before but you keep ignoring it since it doesn't fit your stereotype.
 
Old 06-20-2019, 11:46 AM
 
15,402 posts, read 7,871,041 times
Reputation: 7988
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beliciano View Post
Plenty of successful blacks (which includes African Americans, African and Caribbean Immigrants) still think there is plenty of racism in society, not just downtrodden or unsuccessful African Americans like a lot of people here think. I work with blacks who make well into six figures and believe me they are not shy around me when they say they feel like they have dealt with and still deal with discrimination.

If you never heard black immigrants talk about how racists they feel society is, then they probably don't feel comfortable talking about it to YOU . As a black immigrant myself, I often find a lot of us are just not as vocal about it around whites as African Americans are. My best friend in college was Nigerian, initially when he first came over he did not think this country was racist and that African Americans complained to much. Over a decade later he changed his tune. I can't even lie there was a time where I sounded like a hardcore conservative on racial issues, until I had my N**** wake-up call in my 20's.

African Americans are not the only people who call out racism in society as many people here act. Look at England where a large portion of the black community is of Caribbean descent and they have been vocally frustrated by racism for decades. Many of the most vocal critics of American racism were foreign born themselves (Marcus Garvey, Stokley Carmicheal). Then again the sentiment here is not surprising, watch videos from the 1960's and most of the whites shown on film did not think black folks had a reason to be upset even with all the crap going on.
Wanted to note on the blue, I have Nigerian American family members who went through the same thing. Nearly all of my Nigerian friends and other African countries friends/associates say the same thing in that they initially thought we black Americans were complaining until they became subjected to racist behavior/treatment themselves more than a few times and then they saw what we were "complaining" about lol.
 
Old 06-20-2019, 11:55 AM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 7 days ago)
 
47,980 posts, read 45,443,916 times
Reputation: 15309
Quote:
Originally Posted by sampra View Post
Six figure making Nigerian here. Please don't use us as a "model minority". There are many obstacles I've had to face and dealt with blatant racism in my journey. There is racism in education, the workforce and everyday interactions. Constantly having to validate yourself as a "good one" in society gets very annoying. Microaggressions are rampant and people do not even notice the offensive things they say.
Blacks in America have gone through something that no other race has gone through (Slavery, Jim Crow, Systematic racism, Race riots, War on drugs, red-lining, leader assassinations) and still continue to go through racism today, while having some success. When a race starts to constantly get grinded into the dirt, more dirt begins to stick.
Stop trying to use us to discredit American blacks and instead look at it as we are the minimum of what American blacks could achieve if society was not as messed up as it is.
I'm not surprised that there are some people now trying to make Africans "the model minority". Using Asians as the "model minority" is considered too obvious. Some people are only using Africans as a way of saying "see, those Black people can make it. There must be something wrong with American Blacks".

I do agree that there are Africans in America facing racism. I've heard Africans talk about some of the experiences they have had being Black in America. This is how I see things. Black people in America succeed in America in spite of the discrimination and racism they face.

Many people aren't going to think about the crap American Blacks have gone through. Part of it has to do with some things not changing. Black Americans have always been looked down on. And it's nothing new.
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