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Old 06-09-2019, 06:15 AM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
4,352 posts, read 7,474,444 times
Reputation: 6795

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wartrace View Post
I was in grade school during the early 70's and there weren't many "fat kids". I recall maybe 5 or 6 out of 200 kids. Of those maybe 2 were obese.
Exactly, me too, and our school cafeteria served things like pizza and chocolate cake. We also played outdoors year round and while not one kid on the block had a video game system or Netflix, every one of them had a bicycle/skateboard/roller skates. It was a whole different, much more active lifestyle.

While I do appreciate what Michelle Obama tried to do to curb childhood obesity by changing the menus in school cafeterias, and that's maybe the only thing I have ever appreciated about her, I think we all knew it was doomed to fail because kids today want what they want and have been so catered to that rather than eat a plate full of vegetables at school, they are just waiting to get home and dig into the Twinkies, Doritos, and fast food. I don't see how this will get turned around until parents start feeding kids a healthy diet from the time they begin eating solid food, and that ain't happening, fast food and junk food is too easy and often used as a reward. Once you start giving a kid unhealthy food as a reward, you begin a complex relationship between that kid and food that will probably haunt them for the rest of their life.

For those of you who condone punishing obese people by raising their insurance rates, I see what you are saying but then do we raise the rates on people who are thin but drink in excess or use drugs, or do they get let off the hook because they have an addiction that is considered a disease outside of their control? Many people would argue that people who are set up from childhood to have a emotionally complex relationship with unhealthy food also have an addiction, and one that is even harder to treat because we don't need alcohol or drugs but we obviously must eat. So do they get a break because they also suffer from a disease or do they get fat shamed while alcoholics get compassion?
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Old 06-09-2019, 06:34 AM
 
52,331 posts, read 42,092,330 times
Reputation: 32652
Quote:
Originally Posted by pknopp View Post
In his prime, Mike Tyson was considered obese.

BMI is a very simple measurement. While it takes height into consideration, it does not account for factors such as:

waist or hip measurements
proportion or distribution of fat
proportion of muscle mass
These, too, can have an impact on health.

High-performance athletes, for example, tend to be very fit and have little body fat. They can have a high BMI because they have more muscle mass, but this does not mean they are overweight.
Good post.

We have a weight problem in the US, I agree with that, but BMI is pretty much "chainsaw surgery".
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Old 06-09-2019, 06:40 AM
 
79,548 posts, read 33,992,578 times
Reputation: 15986
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathguy View Post
Good post.

We have a weight problem in the US, I agree with that, but BMI is pretty much "chainsaw surgery".
We do have an issue but it's overblown.
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Old 06-09-2019, 06:49 AM
 
8,872 posts, read 10,937,926 times
Reputation: 12940
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wartrace View Post
I was in grade school during the early 70's and there weren't many "fat kids". I recall maybe 5 or 6 out of 200 kids. Of those maybe 2 were obese.
Ya, I was in grade school in the 60's and can't remember many overweight kids either. Probably 1 or 2. It wasn't the norm. We were out playing, walked everywhere, rode our bikes and all of that. And, we ate just normal portions sizes. Genetics is a factor, but food choices and activity just as important.
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Old 06-09-2019, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Watervliet, NY
4,377 posts, read 1,624,704 times
Reputation: 8006
Quote:
Originally Posted by mightleavenyc View Post
Simple. Make them pay their fair share for insurance! Insurance premiums should be heavily based on lifestyle.
Interesting. I have a nephew whose BMI puts him in the "overweight" category, just under obese, at 6'3 and 220 pounds. That gives him a BMI of 27.5.

He's also a multi-sport athlete, football and both indoor and outdoor track and field. He also mountain bikes and Nordic skis (he used to be a competitive skier) on a recreational basis and competes in local road races.

So... he should pay more, why? He's in shape already, and a lot of that 220 is muscle mass.


Found a photo of him receiving the Student Council sports award at his high school sports banquet from the other day. Yep... real overweight, isn't he?

https://www.adirondackdailyenterpris...dent-athletes/

Last edited by ContraPagan; 06-09-2019 at 08:36 AM..
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Old 06-09-2019, 07:16 AM
 
Location: Watervliet, NY
4,377 posts, read 1,624,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jabronie View Post
Is Donald Trump Obese?
Funny how my nephew I mentioned in my previous post is only 10 pounds lighter (same height) but in far better shape than Trump is! There's literally no comparison.
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Old 06-09-2019, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Watervliet, NY
4,377 posts, read 1,624,704 times
Reputation: 8006
Quote:
Originally Posted by pknopp View Post
In his prime, Mike Tyson was considered obese.
That's true of a lot of athletes who have a high muscle mass, because BMI doesn't factor in whether the weight is from fat or from muscle. They both weight the same but muscle is denser. I mentioned my nephew in an earlier post - no way would you look at him and say he's overweight, almost "obese." Flat stomach, and well muscled legs and upper body, and he's competed in 4 different sports in his 17 years.
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Old 06-09-2019, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Federal Way, WA
665 posts, read 203,933 times
Reputation: 667
It would be a good start to stop subsidizing junk food production, but both parties are scared to touch farm subsidies.
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Old 06-09-2019, 10:59 AM
 
37,645 posts, read 16,317,275 times
Reputation: 8547
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovecrowds View Post
https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/download...rends_2010.pdf

https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html

Amazing, how trendy obesity has become. I have to laugh when people suggest "Medicare for All" when there is such shocking obesity.

The only way we could ever have "Universal Health Care" is if obesity went close to zero and every one ate exclusively a healthy diet and those that can worked out constantly.

Many of the 40% will be graduating on into morbid obesity very quickly. Which means many chronic ailments per person. Many obese young adults today likely won't be able to work in a decade as they graduate into morbid obesity and have to go to appointments every other day.

Many people in their 20s and 30s can hardly walk not because of disability, but because of their obesity.

How the heck can the country afford a universal health care system when 40% plus of people are racing as fast as they can to have chronic ailments that last decades.

I remember seeing pictures of people a hundred years ago in history books and the average American looked like a supermodel, compared to the majority today.

In a generation basically go from 18 states where less than 1 in 10 is obese, to 40% obesity across the entire nation.
The whole CDC thing on obesity is ridiculous. A while back they had Michael Jordon in is prime listed as being obese!
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Old 06-09-2019, 01:26 PM
Status: "You showed me mercy and all I can do is say Thank You." (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: New York
1,480 posts, read 292,561 times
Reputation: 1106
Quote:
Originally Posted by thelogo View Post
GMO's crops became widespread in the mid 90's. I was checking obesity graphs and most seem to show that the obesity problem started in the 70's.

The most recent change in diet at the time was a switch from animals to "vegetable" fat, should be called grains fat. These fats are so industrialized that you can put it in a diesel motor and it will run just fine. I believe it is the main culprit.
I would agree with you that animal fats are much lower in trans-fats. Pork lard is actually healthier than butter which is healthier than margarine. Margarine certainly helped add to the problem when in the 60s and 70s the margarine companies convinced people that their product was healthier than butter, which is as bad as tobacco companies claiming that smoking was healthy.

The point I was making about GMOs was the rise of diseases. The curve may have begun to rise for obesity in the 70s, however, it has spiked since the late 90s. Also, since the late 90s diabetes, which has always related to obesity, tripled per capita in just 20 years. THAT is not normal and correlates with GMOs.

People have woke to this fact. Companies are starting to use non-GMO grains, farmers are starting to go back to traditional farming and using heirloom seeds because roundup ready seeds are starting to fail.

Also, there are many pending lawsuits against the Monsanto and DuPont because their poison in now found in 75% of us. They have spoiled our land. They might as well have dumped that poison in our waterways. They turned our farmlands into supersites.

The following are just some of the health effects of glyphosate, all of which are known to increase cancer risk. Glyphosate:
  1. Damages the DNA
  2. Is an antibiotic
  3. Promotes leaky gut
  4. Chelates minerals, making them unavailable
  5. Is toxic to the mitochondria
  6. Interferes with key metabolic pathways
  7. Causes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
  8. Degrades into Sarcosine and formaldehyde
These side-effects and diseases will cause obesity to skyrocket.

https://responsibletechnology.org/gmos-and-cancer/

I hope these companies are sued out of existence. I don't know how many decades it will take to clean up their mess, if at all.
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