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Old Yesterday, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Washington State
18,783 posts, read 9,682,398 times
Reputation: 15994

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 4dognight View Post
Because there has never been heat waves, property damage and crop loss due to storms and drought until recently. What records from over hundreds of years are you comparing the weather now to?
At least the Kool-aid will keep you hydrated.
Nothing's changed, the weather changes with the seasons and fronts come and go....just like it's always been. I'm predicting right now that come January, it will freeze in North Dakota.
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Old Yesterday, 09:33 AM
 
10,895 posts, read 4,068,700 times
Reputation: 5284
The Earth has warmed since the end of the "little ice age" which lasted from about 1350 to 1850, a time during which glaciers advanced, crop failures increased, deaths from epidemics and plague were common and Washington crossed an ice-choked Delaware river. So, we were due for an upturn and we have gotten it.

Prior to that, we had the medieval warming period, which lasted from 800 to about 1300. This was when the Vikings were the terror of Europe and Greenland was actually green. Since this starting point, it has cooled.

So as you can see, the warming we have experienced since the end of the little ice-age is not unusual or unexpected at all. And neither is the cooling we have experienced since the medieval warming period.

It all depends on when you start your measurements.
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Old Yesterday, 09:57 AM
 
2,270 posts, read 661,517 times
Reputation: 1926
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brave New World View Post

The UK has a few days of hot weather but is not burning up, and the summer overall has been mild and cool.

The US has been mosre more effected in terms of hurricanes and many other such dangewrous weather conditions.
(Waves hand dismissively)..."Ah, that's merely weather, not climate."

This summer in much of the U.S. has been cooler than normal as well. A low of 68 deg. F in Houston, Texas, such as occurred on July 25 and 26, could well be a harbinger of an impending ice age.

While it's still early in the Atlantic hurricane season, 2019 has been mostly quiet in the tropics thus far, due in part to Saharan dust in the atmosphere which tends to inhibit tropical storm formation. 2018 was also fairly quiet, especially when compared to 2017, which was a statistical outlier for Atlantic storm seasons. 2019 has been a fairly active year for tornadoes thus far with 918, but that still falls well within historical norms. 2018 was an average year for tornado activity in the U.S, with 1,123, but a record low in fatalities (10), probably due to the fact that there were no reported EF4 or EF5 tornadoes reported in the U.S. that year.

While there is no escaping violent weather events in the U.S., there are bound to be some years that are more active than others. The overall trend of fatalities due to violent weather in the U.S. is down, due to more robust prediction and warning capabilities. To the extent that property damage from tropical storms may be increasing, the same can be easily explained by population increases (hence, more infrastructure susceptible to storm damage) along the coastlines.
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Old Yesterday, 10:03 AM
 
24,183 posts, read 12,015,288 times
Reputation: 10316
It’s just weather.
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Old Yesterday, 10:04 AM
 
13,790 posts, read 9,393,537 times
Reputation: 4501
More proof the planet is seeing rapid warming. Just figure all the above normal days i have had the last 8 years vs the below normal days on temps and the above normal days are 90% more.
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Old Yesterday, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Victoria, BC.
30,922 posts, read 31,833,210 times
Reputation: 12664
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spartacus713 View Post
The Earth has warmed since the end of the "little ice age" which lasted from about 1350 to 1850, a time during which glaciers advanced, crop failures increased, deaths from epidemics and plague were common and Washington crossed an ice-choked Delaware river. So, we were due for an upturn and we have gotten it.

Prior to that, we had the medieval warming period, which lasted from 800 to about 1300. This was when the Vikings were the terror of Europe and Greenland was actually green. Since this starting point, it has cooled.

So as you can see, the warming we have experienced since the end of the little ice-age is not unusual or unexpected at all. And neither is the cooling we have experienced since the medieval warming period.

It all depends on when you start your measurements.
Or where....The medieval warming period only affected the northern hemisphere.
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