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Old 07-30-2019, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Cumberland Co., TN
22,596 posts, read 22,146,401 times
Reputation: 21886

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
With all the talk about how terrible America's cities are lately and how rural America is a shining example of the 'real America', why is rural America in such decline? Why is there so much poverty in the Ozarks and Appalachia? Why does everyone who has the means to want to move to the big city for employment and quality of life? In addition, very few cities are predominantly conservative.

https://www.citylab.com/perspective/...ecline/588883/
Appalachia, ha. Do you know how big Appalachia is? And the Ozarks? I hate it when people speak of Appalachia as a homogeneous area soaked in poverty and despair.
Since Appalachia actually consist of 205,000 square acres covering areas from southern NY to northern Mississippi I can only tell you about the rural area of Appalachia in which I live. The nearest incorporated town has a current population of ~2800 which has increased about 1500 since 1910 despite a large exodus in the 40's when the coal mines closed and the soldiers returned from WWII. Today is much like in the 40's when many had to move north to find jobs. Employment opportunities just are plentiful so young people, especially those out of college must relocate to find work in their field. But they come back when they can retire, just like so many of those soldiers did. That is how I ended up here. Not only those with ties return but we are inundated with transplants the majority from CA, NJ, FL in my area. Others leave for adventure, college, some may even feel the way you do about rural life.

Why is there so much poverty? That is a pretty long discussion. For an idea in my area a good read is Night Comes to the Cumberlands: A Biography of a Depressed Area by Harry Caudill
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Old 07-30-2019, 07:32 AM
 
Location: alexandria, VA
10,400 posts, read 4,629,999 times
Reputation: 5763
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2mares View Post
Appalachia, ha. Do you know how big Appalachia is? And the Ozarks? I hate it when people speak of Appalachia as a homogeneous area soaked in poverty and despair.
Since Appalachia actually consist of 205,000 square acres covering areas from southern NY to northern Mississippi I can only tell you about the rural area of Appalachia in which I live. The nearest incorporated town has a current population of ~2800 which has increased about 1500 since 1910 despite a large exodus in the 40's when the coal mines closed and the soldiers returned from WWII. Today is much like in the 40's when many had to move north to find jobs. Employment opportunities just are plentiful so young people, especially those out of college must relocate to find work in their field. But they come back when they can retire, just like so many of those soldiers did. That is how I ended up here. Not only those with ties return but we are inundated with transplants the majority from CA, NJ, FL in my area. Others leave for adventure, college, some may even feel the way you do about rural life.

Why is there so much poverty? That is a pretty long discussion. For an idea in my area a good read is Night Comes to the Cumberlands: A Biography of a Depressed Area by Harry Caudill
A must read for anyone with an interest in the Appalachian plateau. Heartbreaking book though. I'm a city boy but I've always had a soft spot for the Southern hill country.
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Old 07-30-2019, 08:02 AM
 
4,512 posts, read 1,987,678 times
Reputation: 3193
Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
With all the talk about how terrible America's cities are lately and how rural America is a shining example of the 'real America', why is rural America in such decline? Why is there so much poverty in the Ozarks and Appalachia? Why does everyone who has the means to want to move to the big city for employment and quality of life? In addition, very few cities are predominantly conservative.

https://www.citylab.com/perspective/...ecline/588883/
The only place I read about how terrible cities are is here and from Trump. Two sources I don't take too seriously. The American city is back. People now want to live in walk-able areas, near public transport. Rural America is dying. The middle of the country is emptying out b/c there are no jobs after the manufacturing plants moved to Mexico and then China. Farms are huge corporations that are becoming automated. The family farm is dying in the middle b/c cannot compete. You want a good paying job and opportunity--you move to a city near the coast.

This explains a lot of the anger seen on sites like this and why trump was elected. They live in dying rural areas with no growth. Many have turned to drugs while others turn to hating "libruals" or maybe a combination of both. Having an enemy gives one something to live for and a way to pass the time before dying early from diabetes or emphysema.
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Old 07-30-2019, 08:17 AM
 
483 posts, read 142,437 times
Reputation: 602
When you are young and without kids, its the excitement of the big city. When you get older and with a family it is work and inertia where it becomes very difficult to get out.
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Old 07-30-2019, 08:57 AM
 
11,063 posts, read 6,545,699 times
Reputation: 6106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oakformonday View Post
The only place I read about how terrible cities are is here and from Trump. Two sources I don't take too seriously. The American city is back. People now want to live in walk-able areas, near public transport. Rural America is dying. The middle of the country is emptying out b/c there are no jobs after the manufacturing plants moved to Mexico and then China. Farms are huge corporations that are becoming automated. The family farm is dying in the middle b/c cannot compete. You want a good paying job and opportunity--you move to a city near the coast.

This explains a lot of the anger seen on sites like this and why trump was elected. They live in dying rural areas with no growth. Many have turned to drugs while others turn to hating "libruals" or maybe a combination of both. Having an enemy gives one something to live for and a way to pass the time before dying early from diabetes or emphysema.

Hell yeah !! Just bring your own tent.


https://youtu.be/eDaQ_UMV1zw


https://youtu.be/45qSj4_DVxs


https://youtu.be/I-PWTyPDrdA


https://youtu.be/DVxeW1WLWpY


https://youtu.be/G3aK5Fzv1YI
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Old 07-30-2019, 09:05 AM
 
4,512 posts, read 1,987,678 times
Reputation: 3193

Your response to income inequality is duly noted. I presume these videos are of homeless encampments. This is what happens when capitalism is successful and there is no safety net for those that cannot compete. In your rural area they can live cheaply in trailers, run down housing, etc. Cities are extremely expensive. In my neighborhood, 2 bedroom condos can sell for $700,000. Can you afford that? What would keep your rural neighbors from living like those in the posted videos if they were to move to a coastal city? I gotta go to work so I can pay for my expensive city condo. Cheers.
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Old 07-30-2019, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,835 posts, read 13,544,864 times
Reputation: 11384
I just got back from rural MA where I was visiting my parents. It's beautiful and clean, but quiet, and for a young person there are few obvious opportunities for exponential growth like you would get in a major metro.

It's just fine for my veteran dad with PTSD. I don't mind it out there as much now that I'm married and have a kid, so my main focus is family and work. When I was single, I couldn't stand it... Nothing to do, few eligible women, etc.
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Old 07-30-2019, 09:12 AM
 
17,361 posts, read 4,599,550 times
Reputation: 11967
Quote:
Originally Posted by r small View Post
A must read for anyone with an interest in the Appalachian plateau. Heartbreaking book though. I'm a city boy but I've always had a soft spot for the Southern hill country.
I lived in WV and Central TN (very different places, tho) and always wondered about the history. When I lived there I did hear about incest and being cut off from civilization until relatively recently. I read a little about the abuse of the people and the land by the Robber Barons and other similar themes.

But I never knew the history of exactly where the people came from until reading that book. Former indentured servants and plantation overseers who were illiterate and came from illiterates. The description of their forefathers back in Europe who had no trades or literacy answers a LOT of question and should make people think about history and about how modern times are informed and formed by it.

The Germans settled PA and created amazing agriculture (even the Amish!) and vast Founderies and industries - not because they were special, but because their old country has instilled skills and literacy and civility into them. It's in the DNA. Jewish and Quaker folk settled Newport and many other places and established trade internationally....and prospered...again, due to education over generations and familiarity with these specific trades (ability to get along with others, negotiate, understand complex ideas, etc.).

In a sense, the history of much of Appalachia is really an extension of the great harm done by the Slave based economy....with a topping of Wall Street and London capitalism to exploit their ignorance. Looking a step further back, it was the UK casting off "undesirables" (as per the book)....which they didn't want to integrate into their societies.

The poor of Detroit, Baltimore and the opiate addled masses of the deep hollows have a lot in common - that of being exploited by more highly educated and powerful forces beyond their control...and kept largely in the dark because of our system.
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Old 07-30-2019, 09:14 AM
 
8,076 posts, read 2,852,924 times
Reputation: 3174
I live in a town of about 15K. We have homeless living in the woods. You are naive if you think homelessness and tent cities are strictly limited to big cities.
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Old 07-30-2019, 09:20 AM
 
17,361 posts, read 4,599,550 times
Reputation: 11967
Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
I just got back from rural MA where I was visiting my parents. It's beautiful and clean, but quiet, and for a young person there are few obvious opportunities for exponential growth like you would get in a major metro.

It's just fine for my veteran dad with PTSD. I don't mind it out there as much now that I'm married and have a kid, so my main focus is family and work. When I was single, I couldn't stand it... Nothing to do, few eligible women, etc.
We live in the Pioneer Valley - rural enough that two bears were mating 30 feet from my window a week ago.....and here there are massive opportunities for young people. Not to say it is Boston or NYC, but the large number of colleges have spawned many businesses and I belong to various mentor groups which help these young people start new companies.

Sure - if you are the "top of the pack" - like a leading brain surgeon, you want to be in Boston, but for most others that combination of lower cost living, nature and everything close by (including the support of the vast educational systems) is win-win.

Little towns like Easthampton are booming. One guy started a little bagel place and I would guess he's into the millions of dollars per year already. Another college grad started a Burrito place...same thing.

Plenty of high tech, health care, social science, food science, pot (ha ha) and other jobs and opportunities.

IMHO, this type of a place - might be called the Exurbs other then we don't have those vast subdivisions - is idea for those looking for some balance.
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