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Old 07-30-2019, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,778 posts, read 12,913,760 times
Reputation: 20502

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Quote:
Originally Posted by vacoder View Post
Yeah. But if you are talking about NYC commuting to a true rural area will take over two hours one way and maybe not even achievable.
I guess I'm just old. The milk trains don't run any more?
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Old 07-30-2019, 01:08 PM
 
11,137 posts, read 6,569,717 times
Reputation: 6138
Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
People think the problem in our country today is all due to the lack of "Christian family values" but people want to ignore the effect that the blanketing of America with Wal-Marts and McDonalds had on life and culture, especially in rural America.

Go to any small town USA, unless its a boutique/tourist town, and the main drag will look something like this.

Here in MI, and surrounding states I find most of the small towns still have small diners or really great quant little restaurants, but these states are more touristy than OK or KS. The further west I've traveled , back to the home state of KS I find your picture spot on. In my old home town of 13k people I found only one little diner, the rest was fast food garbage. And a couple of great BBQ places. Not sure why this is.
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Old 07-30-2019, 01:29 PM
 
4,531 posts, read 1,998,037 times
Reputation: 3210
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMoreYouKnow View Post
But you live in Oakland CA... your $700K expensive city condo looks like crappy shoe box compared to my $450K 2 story, 5br home on 33 acres of land with a private lake. We all have our priorities, for you it's living nearby a certain area full of like-minded people who'll support you and your beliefs. For me it's to live in a really nice, safe area for my family where I will be left alone in peace and to have enough land to do whatever the hell I want.
Oh, I didn't buy a $700k condo. I paid much less before my area gentrified and became expensive due to high demand and low supply. I agree that we can all have different preferences for where we live. My priority is to be walking distance to stores, the subway, work, etc. I live in a multicultural area and we all get along. My neighborhood has Christian churches and a Jewish temple. Nearby is another temple and Muslim churches. We both probably have misconceptions about each other. Most of my neighbors are just living their lives the best way they can.
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Old 07-30-2019, 01:31 PM
miu
 
Location: MA/NH
17,304 posts, read 35,059,794 times
Reputation: 16560
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seacove View Post
Apparently what it takes to run a farm is $50 Billion in taxpayer money. The real question is can a farm be successful without farm subsidies and tariff relief? Just growing the crops and selling them without taxpayer "generosity". How much is an ear of corn with all the additional money? $5.00? More?

The bigger problem is Republicans are not fans of advanced education.
The governor of Alaska is cutting 41% of University of Alaska's money - $130 million (which is nothing, scraps, in Trump farmer money). Teachers will be released, classes cut and students will leave. The trickle down effect will be that students will leave Alaska, get their education somewhere else and be unlikely to return. Thus, Alaska'a educated workforce will decrease year after year as those that remain age. This is what the Republican party represents and it's why urban areas are more educated and attract more jobs. Companies look for an educated workforce to draw from and Alaska will not be one of those, not unlike what happens in rural areas.
As a fiscal conservative, I don't see the need for every single young person in America to get an advanced degree, one that costs so much money to attain. Our society also needs to have our young people consider work in the skilled trades. In fact, we are facing a shortage in skilled trade workers.

We have the same problem in NH, pushing all of our students into higher education only results in them leaving our rural state behind for cities where there are jobs for their degrees.

I don't like how you and other liberals are implying that without a masters or a PhD, a person is "uneducated".

Also, immigrants who lack any sort of formal education AND who can't speak or write English, aren't suitable candidates for American skilled trade jobs. There's a big divide between being a day worker picked up at a Home Depot parking lot or landscaper and... a construction worker, sheet metal worker, or licensed electrician or plumber who has put in their time as an apprentice, journeyman and finally being a master at their craft and bonded.

BTW would it be so terrible if Alaska loses human population? Don't you have issues with air pollution in the winter time from all the wood burning stove? And it's not very "green" when it's so cold outside and your automobiles need engine heaters. Leave Alaska to those who are willing to rough it in the wild. living in a small cabin
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Old 07-30-2019, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Cumberland Co., TN
22,642 posts, read 22,183,621 times
Reputation: 21953
Bottom line is its a free country live where you want to live.
Some like rural living, some like city living.

I'm not sure why those who dont live in rural areas are so worried about some so called decline and poverty in rural areas.

"Why do you see the speck that is in your brother's eye, but don't consider the beam that is in your own eye?"
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Old 07-30-2019, 01:53 PM
 
Location: In your head, rent free
14,924 posts, read 8,005,284 times
Reputation: 7669
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seacove View Post
The bigger problem is Republicans are not fans of advanced education.
Maybe, just maybe that's because the cost of college has become outrageous and we've got a massive shortage of skilled labor in this country right now which is just going to get worse every year. Everyone doesn't have to go to college, everyone doesn't need a college degree to be wildly successful and very well paid.

We need plumbers, welders, electricians, mechanics and other skilled tradesmen more than we need people with advanced philosophy, marketing or sociology degrees right now. We're educating kids for jobs that don't exist using money that doesn't exist and we keep wondering why they're upset when they get out of college in debt and working at Starbucks.
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Old 07-30-2019, 01:55 PM
 
18,575 posts, read 11,490,826 times
Reputation: 9810
Quote:
Originally Posted by miu View Post
As a fiscal conservative, I don't see the need for every single young person in America to get an advanced degree, one that costs so much money to attain. Our society also needs to have our young people consider work in the skilled trades. In fact, we are facing a shortage in skilled trade workers.

We have the same problem in NH, pushing all of our students into higher education only results in them leaving our rural state behind for cities where there are jobs for their degrees.

I don't like how you and other liberals are implying that without a masters or a PhD, a person is "uneducated".

Also, immigrants who lack any sort of formal education AND who can't speak or write English, aren't suitable candidates for American skilled trade jobs. There's a big divide between being a day worker picked up at a Home Depot parking lot or landscaper and... a construction worker, sheet metal worker, or licensed electrician or plumber who has put in their time as an apprentice, journeyman and finally being a master at their craft and bonded.

BTW would it be so terrible if Alaska loses human population? Don't you have issues with air pollution in the winter time from all the wood burning stove? And it's not very "green" when it's so cold outside and your automobiles need engine heaters. Leave Alaska to those who are willing to rough it in the wild. living in a small cabin
If Alaska wants to chase away a younger, educated work force, that's on them. They can be the new Appalachia for all I care but it is a good example of what happens in red state areas. They chase away an educated workforce then complain when companies don't choose them as a location, ignoring that they don't have the educated workforce the companies are looking for.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMoreYouKnow View Post
Maybe, just maybe that's because the cost of college has become outrageous and we've got a massive shortage of skilled labor in this country right now which is just going to get worse every year. Everyone doesn't have to go to college, everyone doesn't need a college degree to be wildly successful and very well paid.

We need plumbers, welders, electricians, mechanics and other skilled tradesmen more than we need people with advanced philosophy, marketing or sociology degrees right now. We're educating kids for jobs that don't exist using money that doesn't exist and we keep wondering why they're upset when they get out of college in debt and working at Starbucks.
No one opposes vocational training but plenty of those mechanics will need math and engineering training. Alaska destroying their college from within is short-sighted at best. I don't care what they do as long as they don't become another farmer/coal miner bailout. These problems are self-inflicted. Alaska residents get an annual check just for living there. If they would rather defund the college in order to get a bigger check, they absolutely deserve what they get. It's that kind of short-sighted thinking the conservative rurals excel at. Go for the sugar high today (environment/education/health care, etc.) rather than invest in the future.
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Old 07-30-2019, 01:55 PM
 
49,752 posts, read 46,420,799 times
Reputation: 15731
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
I really can't speak to city life, because I have never lived in one, but a person with the right personality skills can do very well in a rural setting. I'm retired now, but ended up retired on 90 scenic acres with a quarter mile of creek frontage, a fully remodeled and updated house, an 2000 square foot shop, no mortgage, substantial savings, and a guaranteed monthly income in excess of the monthly bills. Among my circle of friends, I am far from the wealthiest. Almost all of us have been business owners. Demand for goods and services does not stop at the city limits.

As I have mentioned before, it takes a broad skill set to successfully live in a rural setting. Don't judge the rural economy by the failures. Around Atlanta, I suspect rural areas are full of opportunity.
I live in the outskirts of the metro area. Vast majority of jobs in my field are in the city of Atlanta or one of the larger suburbs like Alpharetta, Sandy Springs, Roswell, or Marietta. If the majority of your work involves being on a computer, the cities and larger suburbs are where most of those jobs are. Exurban areas and rural areas, not nearly as much. The opportunities in the Atlanta area are disproportionately concentrated in Atlanta proper and the closest suburbs. Rural areas don't have that many opportunities depending on what you do.

Demand for goods and services doesn't stop at city limits. However, it depends on what your field of expertise is. People move to where their business takes them. And so far, it's the cities. This is not to speak down on rural living. I'm saying that people go where the jobs are highly concentrated. If you work in finance, banking, biotechnology, certain kinds of manufacturing, cities are where alot of those jobs are located. If you work for the state, most of those jobs are in the capital city or the state's largest city.

There is a demand for teachers in rural areas, especially places like rural Montana. However, many people don't want to teach in those areas. In rural areas, not being near certain amenities like professional sports, having living limited entertainment options, many people opt for cities. Or, if not in the city, to live close to the city. In rural areas, you need to be okay with not having the things that cities have. Same goes for doctors.

If you work in ranching, farming, drilling wells, certain kinds of construction, oil industry, mining, then of course those are jobs that can be found in rural areas. Not everyone works in those kinds of jobs. People go where their jobs takes them, and they will go where the amenities are.
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Old 07-30-2019, 01:56 PM
 
7,289 posts, read 1,927,629 times
Reputation: 4357
Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
With all the talk about how terrible America's cities are lately and how rural America is a shining example of the 'real America', why is rural America in such decline? Why is there so much poverty in the Ozarks and Appalachia? Why does everyone who has the means to want to move to the big city for employment and quality of life? In addition, very few cities are predominantly conservative.

https://www.citylab.com/perspective/...ecline/588883/
I went from being originally in Los Angeles to a small town in Oklahoma. No regrets. I know several others that have done or are going to do the same sort of thing. Several new restaurants and businesses have opened up this year. Things are going well.

People tend to want the opposite of what they have so small town people want to sample the big city. And there are also lots of people like me.
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Old 07-30-2019, 01:59 PM
 
Location: North America
19,716 posts, read 12,676,774 times
Reputation: 8363
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexyD View Post
People in cities are snobbish with their frou-frou martinis and going to look at modern art or going to the opera. Most Americans are content to barbeque hamburgers in their backyards.
You don't go to the city much do you? Most city dwellers are too busy busting their humps working for a living to bother with frou frou.
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