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Old 08-02-2019, 06:42 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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Cities subsidize rural communities in terms of tax money.
Rural communities subsidize cities in terms of food, lumber, etc.
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Old 08-02-2019, 06:46 PM
 
18,575 posts, read 11,486,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Cities subsidize rural communities in terms of tax money.
Rural communities subsidize cities in terms of food, lumber, etc.
Really? Is the food and lumber free? Silly me, I've been paying for it all this time.
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Old 08-03-2019, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
12,711 posts, read 4,391,210 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by everwinter View Post
I live in a small town. It's not bad convenience conveniencewise for my current situation because I have 2 small kids, but once the kids are out of the house we're going to move to a condo back in an urban environment. I work in healthcare & was offered more to work in a rural setting than I was in an urban setting, so that's why I'm here for now.

Small town pros: No traffic, parks are always empty, no waiting in line for restaurants, you can bike down the middle of the street & not worry about traffic, grandparents live close by to babysit, housing is cheap.

Small town cons: Racism abounds. Fear of outsiders. People are simply lacking in intelligence. If the locals went to college, it's usually the local community college to get a 2 year associates degree . . . & they think they're hot stuff. People are even more overweight & unhealthy. Many of the locals were married & had kids by the time they were 21. It's weird. Binge drinking is the norm. People don't know how to interact or have fun unless they're drunk. Gossip, closed mindedness.


Basically rural areas are good in respect of getting away from people, however on the downside you are stuck with a small local population who often know too much about each other and gossip.

In terms of big cities, it's the opposite, a never ending wall of people who just don't care about each other and will make you lose your faith in humanity at times. On the plus side annonymity and tolerance can be a plus for some people.

Suburbs are usually a mixture of the two, people just pretend to care about their neighbours, but in reality they live in their own little worlds and people often constantly move in and out of suburbs just as in cities, so your neighbours often change.
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Old 08-03-2019, 07:14 AM
 
9,115 posts, read 5,280,384 times
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why, medical facaity are better in the city, grocery store are better, long commutes for employment, but then traffic worst, crime is worst, noise, people.


its a little of both worlds, I would love to live in a mayberry but got to be close to the city,so im just outside city limits
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Old 08-03-2019, 07:26 AM
 
39,639 posts, read 15,683,124 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Cities subsidize rural communities in terms of tax money.
Rural communities subsidize cities in terms of food, lumber, etc.
Could you please explain how city folks paying for food, lumber, etc. is rural folks subsidizing city folks.
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Old 08-03-2019, 07:36 AM
 
39,639 posts, read 15,683,124 times
Reputation: 25874
Quote:
Originally Posted by everwinter View Post
I live in a small town. It's not bad convenience conveniencewise for my current situation because I have 2 small kids, but once the kids are out of the house we're going to move to a condo back in an urban environment. I work in healthcare & was offered more to work in a rural setting than I was in an urban setting, so that's why I'm here for now.

Small town pros: No traffic, parks are always empty, no waiting in line for restaurants, you can bike down the middle of the street & not worry about traffic, grandparents live close by to babysit, housing is cheap.

Small town cons: Racism abounds. Fear of outsiders. People are simply lacking in intelligence. If the locals went to college, it's usually the local community college to get a 2 year associates degree . . . & they think they're hot stuff. People are even more overweight & unhealthy. Many of the locals were married & had kids by the time they were 21. It's weird. Binge drinking is the norm. People don't know how to interact or have fun unless they're drunk. Gossip, closed mindedness.
Two of our kids are in healthcare and live in rural communities because of the salaries.

There's no waiting for restaurants. Also, no decent restaurants.

Their friends tend to be others in healthcare as the local population trends toward the bottom of the gene pool.

From what I can tell, anyone with any get up and go has already got up and gone, leaving behind the slack-jawed and the dimwitted.

I'm not kidding. Some of the dumbest people I've ever met.
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Old 08-03-2019, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,768 posts, read 12,905,901 times
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Originally Posted by Drewjdeg View Post
That’s absolutely not true, at least in the Midwest; the only place where you can buy everyday goods is Dollar Tree or Walmart, or from the Amish. Places that used to house small shops are gone, replaced with one regional Walmart. Not too much choice in food, Wendy’s or McDonald’s and a couple bars. Maybe a Mexican place or a supper club if you’re lucky.

I did most of my Christmas shopping last year from small businesses, that would’ve been impossible in the rural Midwest. There’s probably more small businesses in Chicago than entire states out West.
The Midwest is a depressed rural area, with a vanishing population. Flat as a pancake allows industrial agriculture, one guy and a 400 hp. diesel can replace dozens of workers. My mother graduated from high school in Mason City, Nebraska. When we visited there in '61, it was a typical small town. Their high school closed years ago, and I heard there are only two businesses in town now, a gas station and a farm supply. That has nothing to do with big box competition, it's just the transition from 80 acre farms to 1200 acre farms. Everybody left.

Contrast that with Myrtle Creek, Oregon is a thriving rural community with a growing population. There's a pretty decent supermarket, a canned food outlet, a radiator and equipment repair shop for big iron, a small equipment sales and repair shop for yard stuff, an equipment rental where you can pick up a backhoe, bobcat, and hundreds of smaller pieces of equipment like hub locators, a feed and seed, a couple pizza parlors and burger outfits, Mexican and Thai restaurants, a recreational and medical pot dispensary, the usual bank, post office, fire station, schools, city hall and police station, and a farm stand just outside the city limits where you can buy fresh fruits and vegetables in season. None of the downtown is boarded. I don't know what those businesses are because they aren't of interest to me, but somebody keeps them open. I think there's a hair salon, tattoo parlor, etc.

I'm not the C of C. My attachment to Myrtle Creek is a mailing address, but it's only 6 miles away and I have been known to drop a few hundred bucks in town. Walmart and Costco are over 20 miles the other direction. and not as convenient.
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Old 08-03-2019, 09:26 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,304 posts, read 508,277 times
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Originally Posted by craigiri View Post
Years ago when I tooled about new england in sales...I was surprised to find out that even many middle class people had lake "camps" or 2nd homes. Yes, they call them "camps", but I've seen them......

So a guy who is in a plumbing wholesaler (not owners - just maybe a buyer) might live in Portland Maine, which isn't bad it itself nature-wise, and also have a place an hour away with a boat, fishing, etc.

Not a bad life! Back in NJ and the Philly area that was rarely the case. Only the wealthier folks had beach and mountain houses...or at least upper middle class two income folks.

There is an article in the WaPo right now about lots of city folks also having burb houses. They love both of them.....

Of course, we have to be realistic and say outright that only a small percentage of the population can BOTH afford this AND afford the time for enjoyment of both.

I consider myself a country person....my life was formed by years in the real boonies when I was in my early 20's - but I simply would go stir-crazy without access to good food, people and other distractions.
I lived in Maine for 14 years to follow a dream, which turned into a nightmare.

The utopia hype is a lie. I had my house and car broken into several times in the first two years. Theft, drugs, alcoholism, infidelity, gossip, xenophobia, racism is all worse when you let your guard down thinking you are in a save place. Lack of education and people in the witness protection program abound. Yes "Witness Protection" I met two people in it! And it not just the people that live in the sticks, white collar society is just as bad. Realtors, doctors, lawyers, etc.

I was told Maine is the biggest small town in America, now I fully get that it is.

It's amazing that I read about everyone's similar stories in rural America throughout our country.

I have stayed at "Camp" it is mostly a small would cottage with Propane lighting, refrigerator and stove that has been passed down in the family for generations. They are usually owned and paid for by the whole family not an individual. The are so cheap, a family member that moved out of state will buy out the rest of the family and renovate it to make it there getaway.

I thought I hated people growing up in NJ and wanted to get away expecting a calmer closer to earth way of life and it is. Until the roomer mill gets started by a handful of locals that just have it in for you for no reason other than "you are from away".

Rural America isn't all bad, just don't expect the warm welcome and friendliness that is advertised. If you like solitude, open space and clean environment its the place to be. They have the same problems as everyplace else, the grass isn't always greener.
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