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Old 07-29-2019, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Manchester NH
10,424 posts, read 2,922,624 times
Reputation: 2776

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Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
I agree that alot of people = high rent. However if alot of people want to move to a city, you might want to ask yourself why this is. Why do so many people want to move to Seattle, Denver, and Portland? Why aren't Republican bastions like Tulsa and Oklahoma City attracting as many people?

And something else. Ethnic districts have been around in big cities and small cities for years upon years.
Yes, ethnic districts have existed for a while, but they are fairly new in the larger picture. For most of human society this concept was fairly foriegn concept. Anyways it was one example to show how urban areas are becoming more uniformed. Even places without an historical Arab, Ukrainian, Nepali, or Indian people are gaining their foods and consumer goods.

It all about global consumption and the power of international finance over people.

As for Tulsa and Oklahoma, those are medium sized cities, not small towns.

Medium size cities have benefited from increased corporate investment when more people move in; typically that happens because of some commodity (to start), but also because families looking for urban living standards need cheaper rent or property prices.


Right now the pendulum is swinging back to metropolitan areas, regardless its not because of their leadership; small towns can compete with the capital magnet that metropolitan areas offer in terms of global connectivity and labor.

If our economy wasn't controlled by shareholders concerned with exclusively boosting short term profits, our country may not want to kill all the small towns and community forward small businesses that keep them alive.
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Old 07-29-2019, 04:46 PM
Status: ""You want a subpoena? Take them, like they're cookies!" (set 1 day ago)
 
18,565 posts, read 11,455,698 times
Reputation: 9802
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winterfall8324 View Post
Yes, and there all being destroyed by excessive traffic, global culture (no identity), and high property prices and rent.

The people are controlled by big finance, credit loans, and corporate investment.

Pretty soon all these global 'champions' around the world (who have destroyed small towns and villages) will be non-descriptive cities with some coffee shops and hipster cafe's breweries, corporate offices, nightclubs, and ethnic districts.

Nothing unique, no community, just engines global capitalism.

It is beyond me why democrats defend these constructs. If they were really the left wing party they would hate these big up and coming cities with their bourgeoisie society.
Defend? Want us to build a wall to keep people (like Texans) moving here? Because that I would support. Cities have big companies including big finance. People move to the cities for jobs and those cities are overwhelmingly Democratic. The voters are educated, employed and pay taxes. Rural voters then take their tax money and use it for their own infrastructure because they don't have the money themselves to pay for it. Let's make every town pay for their own costs. THAT I would support. Not blue city money going to red rural areas. Make that a law across the country and that would include $50 BILLION in farm subsidies.
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Old 07-29-2019, 04:48 PM
 
2,362 posts, read 700,065 times
Reputation: 1996
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seacove

"Texas is the state sending the most newcomers to the Seattle area after California"

Where do Seattle’s newcomers move from? Drivers license numbers reveal some surprises
As your chart shows, that's still fewer than 5,000 individuals inbound to Seattle from Texas in 2017. A paltry comparative trickle, I know we'll both agree.

For comparison, there were 114,413 refugees from California arriving in Texas during the period 2012-2016, for an average of 23,000 +/- per year. Of particular note is the fact that there were 542,432 individuals migrating to Texas from all states during that same period, for an average of 108,000 +/- per year.

https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/o...oving-to-texas

At any rate, obviously, if your complaint is one regarding outsiders coming in to destroy your way of life (whatever form that might take ), then you'll need to take it up with the Californians who are showing up at your doorstep at greater than twice the rate of people from any other state.

You failed to note this unavoidable fact, for reasons you have yet to adequately explain.
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Old 07-29-2019, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Florida
22,975 posts, read 9,851,935 times
Reputation: 18880
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexyD View Post
This is just people who watch tv programs such as Friends. Most people do not want to have to look for parking spots and do not want to be around so many strange ethnic restaurants.
Oh gee--I didn't watch Friends, but I have lived in cities.

Most people? Who exactly are you speaking for? What an extremely illogical statement. That must be why pizza restaurants, Italian restaurants, Chinese restaurants, Thai restaurants, Indian restaurants, Greek restaurants, Mexican restaurants are so very unpopular all over the country.

Because most people only want to eat bland meat and boiled potatoes. And BTW, you don't really need a car or parking spaces if you live in the city.
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Old 07-29-2019, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Manchester NH
10,424 posts, read 2,922,624 times
Reputation: 2776
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicano3000X View Post
Nothing unique? Dude you go into a different block and it has different things to see. Meanwhile out in the burbs you just see a big parking lot with the same generic architecture styled big box store..

Different food/architecture/bars. Theres a ton of things to see and do. We moved to a small spot in Illinois outside of the city. Best thing there? Six flags and the mall.. And chillies..
Yes, and?

Nothing unique is meant in relative to other global cities. Places like London and New York have been homogenizing.

These market choices like one style ethnic food or another is meant to attract the most vibrant population. But if everywhere has everything there is no value in individual location.

I went to Toronto, it was easy to just believe I was in Seattle or San Francisco minus some iconic landmarks.

Chinatown, Starbucks, breweries, Indian food, nightclubs, gay bars, Street art, high scale art gallerias, etc.
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Old 07-29-2019, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Manchester NH
10,424 posts, read 2,922,624 times
Reputation: 2776
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seacove View Post
Defend? Want us to build a wall to keep people (like Texans) moving here? Because that I would support. Cities have big companies including big finance. People move to the cities for jobs and those cities are overwhelmingly Democratic. The voters are educated, employed and pay taxes. Rural voters then take their tax money and use it for their own infrastructure because they don't have the money themselves to pay for it. Let's make every town pay for their own costs. THAT I would support. Not blue city money going to red rural areas. Make that a law across the country and that would include $50 BILLION in farm subsidies.
That's not how it works, economies are interdependent.

The reason red states are subsidized by big cities is because the investment and labor capital is there, while those in small towns need more welfare benefits to stay in their hometown.

This wouldn't have happened if concentrated capital hadn't moved all the labor value to cities depriving small towns of subsistence.

Corporate America buys out liberal by promising them entertainment, advanced social culture, and more diversity.

Besides that liberals shouldn't love NY or Seattle, but hate them for empowering corporate and financial control of our economy and political system.
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Old 07-29-2019, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Dublin, OH
2,613 posts, read 3,500,061 times
Reputation: 1653
The reason rural areas and small towns are declining is because they are boring to live in. I grew up in a small town...if you wanted to do anything fun, you had to drive over an hour to Akron or Cleveland...there were no good restaurants, no good places to shop, only a couple of cheap bars that had no craft beers or anything good with them. People once they get out of high school want to go where there is excitement. There is no way I could ever live in a small town or rural area again.
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Old 07-29-2019, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Florida
22,975 posts, read 9,851,935 times
Reputation: 18880
Hmm--why would people leave a rural town for the city?

One big reason. More jobs, better jobs, higher paying jobs and a future. Oh, and cities are much more interesting, with more young people, and a lot of things to do. Choices? Variety?

My question is why would anyone stay in a rural area with no jobs, no future, and not a whole lot to do besides opiates?
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Old 07-29-2019, 04:59 PM
Status: ""You want a subpoena? Take them, like they're cookies!" (set 1 day ago)
 
18,565 posts, read 11,455,698 times
Reputation: 9802
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milton Miteybad View Post
As your chart shows, that's still fewer than 5,000 individuals inbound to Seattle from Texas in 2017. A paltry comparative trickle, I know we'll both agree.

For comparison, there were 114,413 refugees from California arriving in Texas during the period 2012-2016, for an average of 23,000 +/- per year. Of particular note is the fact that there were 542,432 individuals migrating to Texas from all states during that same period, for an average of 108,000 +/- per year.

https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/o...oving-to-texas

At any rate, obviously, if your complaint is one regarding outsiders coming in to destroy your way of life (whatever form that might take ), then you'll need to take it up with the Californians who are showing up at your doorstep at greater than twice the rate of people from any other state.

You failed to note this unavoidable fact, for reasons you have yet to adequately explain.
California is the most populous state, plus it is blue, just like Washington. I have zero problems with Californians moving here beyond wishing they would spread out, this kind of growth and popularity is too much for Seattle.

Texas is red. Their being the second largest contributor to our growth makes no sense. And all one has to do is see the Texas license plates on our roads. That count was based on driver's licenses, it does not include their families which may or may not have drivers licenses. And that's just to Seattle, not to the entire state.

One reason may be the outrageously high property taxes Texans pay. Trump's tax plan apparently burned a lot of Texas voters too when he removed the SALT deduction. Texas has no income tax just like Washington but Texas has the third highest property taxes in the country after New Jersey and Illinois.

Collin County homeowners had the area's highest average property tax bills in 2018 at $7,692. That's more than twice the average U.S. residential tax.

https://www.dallasnews.com/business/...xes-high-right

Since the annual deduction limit is $10K and $7692. is just the average for Collin County, a suburb of Dallas, plenty of Texans saw a nice tax increase thanks to Trump. Nice to see a red state get burned.
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Old 07-29-2019, 05:04 PM
Status: ""You want a subpoena? Take them, like they're cookies!" (set 1 day ago)
 
18,565 posts, read 11,455,698 times
Reputation: 9802
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winterfall8324 View Post
That's not how it works, economies are interdependent.

The reason red states are subsidized by big cities is because the investment and labor capital is there, while those in small towns need more welfare benefits to stay in their hometown.

This wouldn't have happened if concentrated capital hadn't moved all the labor value to cities depriving small towns of subsistence.

Corporate America buys out liberal by promising them entertainment, advanced social culture, and more diversity.

Besides that liberals shouldn't love NY or Seattle, but hate them for empowering corporate and financial control of our economy and political system.
I do not want my tax dollars sent to rural areas. Trump's entire election was due to rural areas voting for Trump combined with the electoral college. So those voters both elect a man I detest beyond measure, they take my tax money because they are too poor to pay for their own infrastructure and too uneducated to work in a city and earn their own money.

Not only do my tax dollars go to subsidizing them, my tax dollars also go to 15% of West Virginia that is living off of Disability and $50 BILLION with a B to farmers who are less than 2% of the U.S. population. All so they can pass laws increasing pollution. These same people hate illegal immigrants but look the other way if their farmers are depending on those illegal immigrants to milk their cows or harvest their crops.

Why hasn't Trump sent ICE to Iowa and Nebraska? Make those farmers line up their employees and have ICE deport them if they are illegal. The problem is those farmers that are taking our tax money still can't afford to hire U.S. workers and Trump knows it. If Trump is going to force U.S. agencies to move to Grand Junction, CO and Kansas City, MO why not force Appalachia to move to U.S. farms and make them work for a living.

Here's another issue. Big companies need educated workers. Rural voters tend to be less educated. Obama offered massive programs to coal miners so they could retrain at tax payer expense. Got that? Free training. They refused and that's just one example. Rural voters tend not to be able to afford the amenities of a bigger city because they tend to be less educated.
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