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Old Today, 12:34 PM
 
4,409 posts, read 4,629,447 times
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Mass incarceration has been a wild success with plunging crime rates. Now that there is such a thirst to be soft on crime the crime rate will go up. When it gets unbearable there will be another tough on crime cycle.
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Old Today, 12:49 PM
 
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I agree with posters who said you need to study the subject if you're actually interested OP...

However will note that black people have had negative, pervasive stereotypes of us for hundreds of years in this country, which have been used to enslave and imprison us. In regards to how this is "bad" for black people, I'll note that the idea of locking up "criminals" is not seen as "bad" to black people. However, the idea that all or a significant amount of black people are "bad" or criminals and need to be locked up is not one we typically agree with for good reason lol.

I also agree with posters that being even arrested can potentially ruin a young person's future in particular - being arrested can cause a loss of job, can cause a loss of education/scholarship opportunities, and can cause a loss of a significant chunk of someone's life. IMO many of you don't seem to understand the fact that just because someone gets arrested, that doesn't mean they are a criminal. Many black people are falsely arrested every year and suffer harsh economic consequences for things that they didn't do.

Speaking of violent crime, I personally know 3 black men who were arrested, jailed and/or imprisoned for murder who didn't actually murder anyone. One of them was rounded up when a club was shot up and someone killed. The PD arrested over 20 people. Eventually 2 of them were found to be culpable in the crime, but the person I know involved in that one was locked up charged with murder in a county jail for over 6 months waiting for the legal process to conduct itself. He lost his job, lost his house because he couldn't pay for it while locked up and lost all of his belongings while he was in jail during that time. He also went into debt because the money he did have, he had his family pay for him some counsel to get out of that situation. It was long and laborious and it took him 5 years to come back financially from that situation (it happened in 2009).

I have a younger cousin who was a teen - aged 16 back in the 1990s who went with a group of friends to a store to buy some items and one of the group of the friends decided to rob the store. The cousin didn't know that the person in the group - who he didn't know at all very much - had a gun or planned to rob the store. The clerk was shot and killed and all the young men were arrested in the group - there were 4 of them. My cousin spent about 18 months in the county jail and luckily was able to be released. He had attended private school his entire life until then. They were going to charge him as an adult with accessory to murder. His parents were married professionals and made a decent income. They ended up bankrupting their savings and even taking out another mortgage on their home to pay for the legal cost associated with getting their son out of jail. He lost a scholarship opportunity due to that but is doing okay today though it was a traumatic experience. His parents never really recouped their savings lost in battling the legal system. The other 2 boys who also had nothing to do with planning or shooting the clerk, all went to prison for 10-20 years. They were from families who didn't have the resources as my cousin so they could not get out of the predicament so plead guilty to get a reduced sentence and testified against the shooter.

The third is a cousin of my spouse who had a similar instance to my cousin back in the 1990s. He however, was similar to the 2 who went to prison and not my cousin. My spouse's cousin just got out of prison. He was in prison since 1997 until 2018 for an accessory to murder charge.

On non-violent charges, often black people are arrested for things we didn't/don't do. I've personally been arrested for something I didn't do and charged with 2 charges, one a felony. I also luckily have some money so was able to hire a lawyer and the case was dismissed. I also sued the PD and settled to cover my legal fees and other fees associated with my confinement in the county jail. I luckily was on leave at my job at the time I was arrested so I wasn't fired.

I'll be honest in that I wouldn't have such a problem with "mass incarceration" if more people were arrested and charged as criminals on a higher rate besides black people. Drug abuse was mentioned in this thread and there are far more white people today who do drugs than black and IMO white drug abusers get way more assistance today outside of the criminal justice system than black drug addicts did in the past and even today in many cases.
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Old Today, 12:51 PM
 
1,135 posts, read 213,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay F View Post
Mass incarceration has been a wild success with plunging crime rates. Now that there is such a thirst to be soft on crime the crime rate will go up. When it gets unbearable there will be another tough on crime cycle.

And strangely enough... NO OTHER 1st WORLD Country incarcerates as many or sees the recidevism rates the US does.

The US has again created a mangled mess of a system, that no other 1st world country would allow to happen...



Could it be its accepted because its institutional racism?


.
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Old Today, 01:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fat lou View Post
There are neighborhoods where mostly black people live that have massive crime problems. How does removing the criminals from those neighborhoods harm black people? If anything it helps. I used to live in such a neighborhood and I would have been glad to see any criminal removed from the streets.
White America essentially criminalizes black life, and white America has done that since the so called Emancipation Proclamation.

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Old Today, 01:10 PM
 
Location: SGV
24,980 posts, read 9,747,987 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank DeForrest View Post
Drug selling, possessing, using- not crimes
Gambling-not a crime
Prostitution- not a crime
Initiating/committing violence against another - crime
Theft/damage of private property- crimes

Here are some other crimes: the various govt. welfare schemes that destroy families, min.wage laws that abolish entry level jobs, onerous rules and regs that that create barriers to new business start ups, compulsory govt education centers that are havens for violence, not to mention brain damage and have nothing to do with "education".
You tried prompting them but nobody sees the State as a criminal enterprise. The worst criminal enterprise on the streets today just like when I was growing up in the ghetto.
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Old Today, 01:14 PM
 
15,534 posts, read 7,936,209 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Makuria View Post
White America essentially criminalizes black life, and white America has done that since the so called Emancipation Proclamation.
Your comment actually is relevant to the eras prior to 1863 as well in America. One of the excuses for the enslavement of black people originally is the idea that they were inferior and "savage" and criminals who needed the angelic white man to save them (lol - that's sarcasm BTW).
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Old Today, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Suburb of Chicago
21,137 posts, read 10,181,572 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
I might the same about you.

Rather, I would urge you to reread it. I did not challenge your facts. I merely said if what you say is true, then there is a painfully simple solution to counter it.

Put more simply, if a fella keeps sticking his head in a hole and getting hit by a club, common sense dictates he stop sticking his head in that hole.

Put even more simply, stop committing crimes. A criminal who faces a biased justice system is still a criminal.

And not a very smart one.

Like you.
What a simplistic view of reality which means you have zero credibility on the subject.

95% of criminal cases never go to trial because if people don't agree to a plea deal prosecutors will throw every charge at them and ask for maximum sentencing. So even innocent people plead guilty out of fear of what will happen if they don't.

Many have spent years in prison and they haven't even gone to trial because they couldn't come up with bail and are waiting for a hearing.

Black males incarcerated for piddly marijuana charges when pot has been legalized in more and more states, is insane. Get them out and start incarcerating pedophiles and people who hire illegals.

White males get off much lighter than black males who get harsher sentencing.

'Never break the law' is the viewpoint of someone who has zero knowledge of how things really are in our criminal justice system. Not everyone in prison actually broke the law, and when there are white males committing the same crimes who had no prison sentence, it's an unjust system.

Not that I would expect you to care about justice.
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Old Today, 01:21 PM
 
3,263 posts, read 1,719,746 times
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I know it's a difficult concept but follow the law. You would be surprised how much of itself will be fixed if you just follow the law. Don't like the laws? Elected politicians who will change the law!
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Old Today, 01:25 PM
 
29,876 posts, read 16,528,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by retiredcop111 View Post
I know it's a difficult concept but follow the law. You would be surprised how much of itself will be fixed if you just follow the law. Don't like the laws? Elected politicians who will change the law!
With so many laws on the books and with almost every one them criminalizing behaviours where there is no victim, "follow the law" is a not only a meaningless term, its impossible to do.
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Old Today, 01:33 PM
 
29,876 posts, read 16,528,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by No_Recess View Post
You tried prompting them but nobody sees the State as a criminal enterprise. The worst criminal enterprise on the streets today just like when I was growing up in the ghetto.
How does it go? The state is a crime ring with good public relations masquerading as a charitable organization.
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