U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old Yesterday, 01:56 PM
 
465 posts, read 85,071 times
Reputation: 511

Advertisements

I would consider every single person that I know to be bad with money. Libs, Repubs, gay, straight, men, women, college degree, no degree, 100k/yr job, 25k/yr job, doesn’t matter. It’s really quite amazing.

We have a real problem in this county with people not willing to live below their means. The average person is an idiot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old Yesterday, 01:59 PM
 
Location: California
921 posts, read 249,870 times
Reputation: 2615
Quote:
Originally Posted by WiseManOnceSaid View Post
There's a solution to this. Stop buying things you can't afford and start paying cash for things you can afford. You then, in turn, will be out of debt....
Quote:
Originally Posted by PilgrimsProgress View Post
Why are stupid people trying to 'keep up with the Joneses?'
Yep. Couldn't agree more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Finn_Jarber View Post
Maybe they are just trying to maintain the same standard of living as before, but many won't have any other choice than to downgrade, and same goes for the Joneses.
But that's the problem. Why are they trying to maintain something they can't afford?

We are entitled to nothing in this life. Reaching a certain standard doesn't mean you get to stay there forever. I once had a really good job that earned tips and allowed me to save stacks of cash in a relatively short period of time. I had money for whatever I wanted. Then the job ended and those days were over.

Things change, and people have to adjust. If they fail to adjust, it's on them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Volobjectitarian View Post
In every single example story in that article, poor decision making abounds.

The first couple has $50k in credit card debt, including $7500 of debt on a store card (TJ Maxx)? That's BAD decision making right there, and the economy has nothing to do with it.

The second couple has $88k in student loan debt, but only grosses $155k, in Seattle. Middle class in Seattle is north of $200k in a cheap neighborhood. I'd love to know how at 34 each, they have spent 12 years out of college and that is their combined income in that city. Guarantee I find bad decision making if I knew more. First one right off the bat is living in any of the west coast's major population centers, where real estate developers with political friends and enviro-nuts have made the cost of housing absurd. If you have Joe Average jobs after 12 years out of school that put you $90k in the hole, Seattle is not the town for you.

Third couple is lulz, pure and simple. They take a 30% paycut in total gross and THEN decide to finance $48k worth of car loans. Then other jobs "din't work out" and well blah blah.

Every one of these stories is no reflection on the economy, but the economic reality of where bad decisions lead people. If there is anything that is a struggle these days, it is the concept of delayed gratification.
Yep, I don't feel sorry for any of these people. The issues with the economy are very separate from the entitlement and poor decision making displayed by people like this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 02:00 PM
 
4,705 posts, read 1,246,922 times
Reputation: 2204
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finn_Jarber View Post
Thanks Trump.....

Families go deep into debt to stay in the middle class

https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/mark...ass/ar-AAFbEHE

The American middle class is falling deeper into debt to maintain a middle-class lifestyle

Cars, college, houses and medical care have become steadily more costly, but incomes have been largely stagnant for two decades, despite a recent uptick. Filling the gap between earning and spending is an explosion of finance into nearly every corner of the consumer economy.

Consumer debt, not counting mortgages, has climbed to $4 trillion—higher than it has ever been even after adjusting for inflation.
What does Trump have to do with people who cannot manage their finances? This makes you look ridiculous.

Last edited by redwood66; Yesterday at 02:26 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 02:05 PM
 
Location: mancos
7,198 posts, read 6,493,667 times
Reputation: 4956
Lots of people I know go out of their way to make sure their expenses keep up with their income and then one unexpected expense and Boom
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 02:10 PM
Status: "white culture is like living with radiation -IS" (set 14 hours ago)
 
849 posts, read 152,148 times
Reputation: 523
Quote:
Originally Posted by Volobjectitarian View Post
In every single example story in that article, poor decision making abounds.

The first couple has $50k in credit card debt, including $7500 of debt on a store card (TJ Maxx)? That's BAD decision making right there, and the economy has nothing to do with it.

The second couple has $88k in student loan debt, but only grosses $155k, in Seattle. Middle class in Seattle is north of $200k in a cheap neighborhood. I'd love to know how at 34 each, they have spent 12 years out of college and that is their combined income in that city. Guarantee I find bad decision making if I knew more. First one right off the bat is living in any of the west coast's major population centers, where real estate developers with political friends and enviro-nuts have made the cost of housing absurd. If you have Joe Average jobs after 12 years out of school that put you $90k in the hole, Seattle is not the town for you.

Third couple is lulz, pure and simple. They take a 30% paycut in total gross and THEN decide to finance $48k worth of car loans. Then other jobs "din't work out" and well blah blah.

Every one of these stories is no reflection on the economy, but the economic reality of where bad decisions lead people. If there is anything that is a struggle these days, it is the concept of delayed gratification.
all those people are idiots. most people are idiots. its that simple.

part of the problem in this country is that we take years worth of literature classes in K-12 and minutes worth of classes on financial literacy. its idiotic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 02:12 PM
Status: "white culture is like living with radiation -IS" (set 14 hours ago)
 
849 posts, read 152,148 times
Reputation: 523
Quote:
Originally Posted by mirage98de View Post
I would consider every single person that I know to be bad with money. Libs, Repubs, gay, straight, men, women, college degree, no degree, 100k/yr job, 25k/yr job, doesn’t matter. It’s really quite amazing.

We have a real problem in this county with people not willing to live below their means. The average person is an idiot.
my rule of thumb is you can take any group of people over about 20 people and 2/3's of them will be utter morons
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 02:14 PM
 
13,728 posts, read 7,488,782 times
Reputation: 12555
The married PhD student is not too bright. AFTER going from a full time position to a part time one, they took out $48,000 in auto loans (rolling $13,000 of loan balances into the new ones). They are not victims of anything but their own greed and stupidity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
896 posts, read 1,123,169 times
Reputation: 1038
Quote:
Originally Posted by pete98146 View Post
Exactly! My wife is a dental hygienist and all of her co workers tease her about the 2006 Scion that she drives. My wife asked the young lady who was teasing her, "oh how much do you guys pay for your car payments each month?" Response was "me and my husband both have new cars and we pay $1300 per month."


There are little financial tricks that smart people learn:


1. Max out your 401K
2. Buy the smallest house in a really nice neighborhood for your first home
3. Don't buy depreciating assets like new cars
4. Use credit cards for emergencies only.


These are just a few tricks that help folks get ahead....


But...but...but...we want all new everything, are entitled to it, and want it now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Suburb of Chicago
21,164 posts, read 10,196,462 times
Reputation: 20436
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarshaBrady1968 View Post
I concur.

There are not a lot of "how I got rich" stories where you hear:
" the wife and I got a tiny house and shared a 1999 Corolla while we opened up our dream business . We ate ramen, saved what we could, and paid our taxes so we could run an honest business, and I'll be damned if that sucker didn't just take off! Look at us now with our jets and our real estate fortune!"

Most people who write the rich people books say things like "debt is good. never use your own money- get credit from someone else. learn the tax loopholes" etc etc.
The fact that there are some stories of people who lived well beneath their means, invested wisely, and died millionaires, at least tells us that we don't have to go into debt unless there is some catastrophic event we're faced with.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 02:29 PM
 
1,319 posts, read 288,372 times
Reputation: 1954
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finn_Jarber View Post
Thanks Trump.....

Families go deep into debt to stay in the middle class

https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/mark...ass/ar-AAFbEHE

The American middle class is falling deeper into debt to maintain a middle-class lifestyle

Cars, college, houses and medical care have become steadily more costly, but incomes have been largely stagnant for two decades, despite a recent uptick. Filling the gap between earning and spending is an explosion of finance into nearly every corner of the consumer economy.

Consumer debt, not counting mortgages, has climbed to $4 trillion—higher than it has ever been even after adjusting for inflation.

Record debt is everywhere. Consumer, corporate, and all levels of government. The next fiscal crisis will be all about debt and it will be a real doozy. My prediction all along has been that dire times start before the 2020 election (many past posts citing this). Imagine what happens with record debt levels as credit markets freeze........
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top