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Old 08-09-2019, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Rutherfordton,NC
15,195 posts, read 9,335,469 times
Reputation: 10114

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As someone whose been homeless before I donít give money to charities or individuals. Iíll give food, clothing, etc but no money.
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Old 08-09-2019, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Cole Valley, CA
319 posts, read 131,384 times
Reputation: 633
Good question by the OP, but difficult to answer.

I feel compassion for the poor, partly because I grew up in a poor area and think I have a good understanding of some of the difficulties they face in getting out of their situation. Coming up with a way to really help them help themselves is a complex issue. I definitely do not agree with the 'give money to the government and they'll figure it out' approach.

In one sense, I feel it is not that hard for most poor people to make it out of poverty. I did it once, and bet that I could do it again through hard work, discipline, knowledge of how the business world works, and financial knowhow. Unfortunately, it is pretty tough for many to come across those types of knowledge. Compare their environment and network with those raised in more affluent areas where people are financially literate, well connected, and understand the business world at an early age.

So in a sense I am concerned with the plight of the poor, but disagree with any and all tax increases.

Last edited by Dapper Zoom; 08-09-2019 at 01:27 PM..
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Old 08-09-2019, 01:42 PM
 
5,366 posts, read 1,064,781 times
Reputation: 2133
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryan85 View Post
For the elderly and children- I have a lot of sympathy. For the mothers that refuse to use birth control- not much. For the lazy- none.
I think your post here also describes how I feel about the poor! Now say a 15-year-old kid was properly-raised but developed a rebellious attitude and ended up on the streets because of something like joining a gang. I don't know how much sympathy I have for that kid. Yes, this is going off of finding out why that kid is on the streets.
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Old 08-09-2019, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Places you dream of
20,637 posts, read 12,363,695 times
Reputation: 8954
The number of elderly poor had increased _ in Fl some have been known to eat cat food n dog food. People donít want to know. Churches lol some will but some megAs now turn people away n build golf course in back of church / true story near Clearwater fl
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Old 08-09-2019, 01:52 PM
 
Location: OH->FL->NJ
10,359 posts, read 8,250,128 times
Reputation: 4450
We could start enforcing laws against monopoly and oligopolies?

Might not directly help that couple but companies that use monopoly power like big pharma and big hospitals are a menace. I find it interesting that drugs in the US are 2 to 100 times more expensive.

Will not happen since they own congress, but I can dream.
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Old 08-09-2019, 01:58 PM
 
13,153 posts, read 4,792,647 times
Reputation: 5390
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryan85 View Post
For the elderly and children- I have a lot of sympathy.
Do you have so much sympathy that you actually vote for politicians who are not corrupt and campaign on significantly raising the $700 a month ceiling that people who are born disabled and cant work can get in monetary benefits?
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Old 08-09-2019, 02:00 PM
 
3,108 posts, read 1,256,610 times
Reputation: 1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
This question is the result of the current thread about the elderly couple's murder-suicide due to their inability to pay their medical bills (and possibly also due to the wife's health problems). One person was courageous (or foolish) enough to imply that he had absolutely no sympathy for them. That led me to wonder how many people would be willing to let the poor die if doing otherwise would put an additional financial burden on them.

So, in order to put some kind of number on it --

What percentage of your income would you be willing to "donate" through an additional tax deduction to help support those U.S. citizens who cannot support themselves? (Just to take the issue of illegal immigration out of the question.)

My answer would be either 0.5% or 1%.

However, my first choice would be to completely overhaul the U.S. healthcare and "welfare" system.
Why should I have to give more to the federal government for this. There already are plenty of programs to help those who need it. I am in favor of a safety net but I feel the net has gotten too large and covers people who don’t need it.
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Old 08-09-2019, 02:00 PM
 
13,153 posts, read 4,792,647 times
Reputation: 5390
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dapper Zoom View Post
Good question by the OP, but difficult to answer.

I feel compassion for the poor, partly because I grew up in a poor area and think I have a good understanding of some of the difficulties they face in getting out of their situation. Coming up with a way to really help them help themselves is a complex issue. I definitely do not agree with the 'give money to the government and they'll figure it out' approach.

In one sense, I feel it is not that hard for most poor people to make it out of poverty. I did it once, and bet that I could do it again through hard work, discipline, knowledge of how the business world works, and financial knowhow. Unfortunately, it is pretty tough for many to come across those types of knowledge. Compare their environment and network with those raised in more affluent areas where people are financially literate, well connected, and understand the business world at an early age.

So in a sense I am concerned with the plight of the poor, but disagree with any and all tax increases.
Is there any proof that anything other than a public safety net actually help reduce poverty and despair among the masses in a meaningful way?
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Old 08-09-2019, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Out West
23,129 posts, read 17,112,444 times
Reputation: 26761
Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
This question is the result of the current thread about the elderly couple's murder-suicide due to their inability to pay their medical bills (and possibly also due to the wife's health problems). One person was courageous (or foolish) enough to imply that he had absolutely no sympathy for them. That led me to wonder how many people would be willing to let the poor die if doing otherwise would put an additional financial burden on them.

So, in order to put some kind of number on it --

What percentage of your income would you be willing to "donate" through an additional tax deduction to help support those U.S. citizens who cannot support themselves? (Just to take the issue of illegal immigration out of the question.)

My answer would be either 0.5% or 1%.

However, my first choice would be to completely overhaul the U.S. healthcare and "welfare" system.
Zero. I don't need the government to take my money and declare that they're going to "use it for the poor".

I can make that money go a lot further helping people.

Yes, I care, no, I don't need the government to do it for me. I can help people all by myself.
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Old 08-09-2019, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Camberville
12,174 posts, read 16,942,042 times
Reputation: 20098
I'll be honest, I feel less sympathy for the elderly and far more for poor young adults.



The elderly have had decades to plan, save, and build a career. When I got my cancer diagnosis at 23, there was FAR more help available for an elderly person who had 40+ years in the working world to save and establish themselves compared to my 4 months into my first job out of college with the related entry level salary.


My philanthropic priorities both in money and time will always be for young adults ranging from 15 to 35ish.
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