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View Poll Results: Do you believe Epstein committed suicide?
Yes 114 26.57%
No 315 73.43%
Voters: 429. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-10-2019, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
5,034 posts, read 2,298,212 times
Reputation: 3208

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TristramShandy View Post
And this is why Alex Jones makes money.

IF this is an actual suicide, the guards were paid to look the other way.

https://slate.com/news-and-politics/...atch-work.html

What happens when an inmate is put on suicide watch?

He’s put in an observation room and kept away from dangerous objects. Suicide watch is mostly designed to prevent hanging, which is far and away the most common suicide method in prisons and hospitals. An observation room might have little more than a mattress on the floor. Any stray bits of fabric could be used as a noose: Some states make sure the inmate sleeps with an extra-thick blanket that can’t be tied or torn into strips. In extreme cases, a prisoner may be undressed and given a paper gown.

Even if a suicidal prisoner does manage to tie something around his neck, he won’t be able to hang himself unless he has somewhere to tie the other end. Rooms are designed without any protrusions from the ceiling, walls, or furniture. Window cages, sprinkler heads, and bunk handles all pose problems. Even bars set low to the ground could be dangerous—an inmate might get on his knees and strangle himself by thrusting his weight forward all at once.

Many suicide-watch rooms have 24-hour video surveillance, but prison staff must also perform routine, in-person checks. Depending on the level of risk—as determined by prison psychiatrists—nurses or corrections officers might drop by once per half-hour or 15 minutes on average. (Staffers mix up the schedule so the prisoner doesn’t know when they’re coming.) At each visit, the prison employee should verify that the inmate is alive and breathing and then mark their observations on a timesheet. Some institutions—including the Federal Bureau of Prisons—have made fellow inmates responsible for these checks. One recent study found that “inmate observers” were more effective than authority figures at calming down a prisoner on suicide watch. (Using inmate observers also saves the prison a lot of money.)

Intermittent checks may not give staffers enough time to stop a suicide attempt, since it takes only four or five minutes to hang yourself. In some states, inmates deemed to be at “acute risk” are given continuous supervision—someone is watching them every minute of every day. This designation is typically reserved for those who seem both inclined to commit suicide and temporarily unable to control their actions. In a hospital setting, the most extreme situations may call for a “sitter” who will remain within arm’s reach of the patient for the duration of the watch.

If the suicide-watch system fails, a prison may be liable for civil damages. The institution must have a reasonable method for assessing risk and preventing self-injury. For example, relevant members of the prison staff should have sufficient training to deal with a suicide attempt. They should also make a concerted effort to keep dangerous objects out of the hands of the inmates.
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Old 08-10-2019, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Lee County, NC
2,502 posts, read 841,721 times
Reputation: 2870
He was supposedly on suicide watch. Something is fishy. I withhold my vote, for now...
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Old 08-10-2019, 09:28 AM
 
Location: UK
1,175 posts, read 274,573 times
Reputation: 1878
Quote:
Originally Posted by AguaDulce View Post
IF this is an actual suicide, the guards were paid to look the other way.

https://slate.com/news-and-politics/...atch-work.html

What happens when an inmate is put on suicide watch?

He’s put in an observation room and kept away from dangerous objects. Suicide watch is mostly designed to prevent hanging, which is far and away the most common suicide method in prisons and hospitals. An observation room might have little more than a mattress on the floor. Any stray bits of fabric could be used as a noose: Some states make sure the inmate sleeps with an extra-thick blanket that can’t be tied or torn into strips. In extreme cases, a prisoner may be undressed and given a paper gown.

Even if a suicidal prisoner does manage to tie something around his neck, he won’t be able to hang himself unless he has somewhere to tie the other end. Rooms are designed without any protrusions from the ceiling, walls, or furniture. Window cages, sprinkler heads, and bunk handles all pose problems. Even bars set low to the ground could be dangerous—an inmate might get on his knees and strangle himself by thrusting his weight forward all at once.

Many suicide-watch rooms have 24-hour video surveillance, but prison staff must also perform routine, in-person checks. Depending on the level of risk—as determined by prison psychiatrists—nurses or corrections officers might drop by once per half-hour or 15 minutes on average. (Staffers mix up the schedule so the prisoner doesn’t know when they’re coming.) At each visit, the prison employee should verify that the inmate is alive and breathing and then mark their observations on a timesheet. Some institutions—including the Federal Bureau of Prisons—have made fellow inmates responsible for these checks. One recent study found that “inmate observers” were more effective than authority figures at calming down a prisoner on suicide watch. (Using inmate observers also saves the prison a lot of money.)

Intermittent checks may not give staffers enough time to stop a suicide attempt, since it takes only four or five minutes to hang yourself. In some states, inmates deemed to be at “acute risk” are given continuous supervision—someone is watching them every minute of every day. This designation is typically reserved for those who seem both inclined to commit suicide and temporarily unable to control their actions. In a hospital setting, the most extreme situations may call for a “sitter” who will remain within arm’s reach of the patient for the duration of the watch.

If the suicide-watch system fails, a prison may be liable for civil damages. The institution must have a reasonable method for assessing risk and preventing self-injury. For example, relevant members of the prison staff should have sufficient training to deal with a suicide attempt. They should also make a concerted effort to keep dangerous objects out of the hands of the inmates.
How does all of this go on and the guy still manages to commit suicide? I agree that someone was paid to look the other way.
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Old 08-10-2019, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Pacific Beach/San Diego
3,852 posts, read 2,556,923 times
Reputation: 3790
Quote:
Originally Posted by AguaDulce View Post
IF this is an actual suicide, the guards were paid to look the other way.

https://slate.com/news-and-politics/...atch-work.html

What happens when an inmate is put on suicide watch?

He’s put in an observation room and kept away from dangerous objects. Suicide watch is mostly designed to prevent hanging, which is far and away the most common suicide method in prisons and hospitals. An observation room might have little more than a mattress on the floor. Any stray bits of fabric could be used as a noose: Some states make sure the inmate sleeps with an extra-thick blanket that can’t be tied or torn into strips. In extreme cases, a prisoner may be undressed and given a paper gown.

Even if a suicidal prisoner does manage to tie something around his neck, he won’t be able to hang himself unless he has somewhere to tie the other end. Rooms are designed without any protrusions from the ceiling, walls, or furniture. Window cages, sprinkler heads, and bunk handles all pose problems. Even bars set low to the ground could be dangerous—an inmate might get on his knees and strangle himself by thrusting his weight forward all at once.

Many suicide-watch rooms have 24-hour video surveillance, but prison staff must also perform routine, in-person checks. Depending on the level of risk—as determined by prison psychiatrists—nurses or corrections officers might drop by once per half-hour or 15 minutes on average. (Staffers mix up the schedule so the prisoner doesn’t know when they’re coming.) At each visit, the prison employee should verify that the inmate is alive and breathing and then mark their observations on a timesheet. Some institutions—including the Federal Bureau of Prisons—have made fellow inmates responsible for these checks. One recent study found that “inmate observers” were more effective than authority figures at calming down a prisoner on suicide watch. (Using inmate observers also saves the prison a lot of money.)

Intermittent checks may not give staffers enough time to stop a suicide attempt, since it takes only four or five minutes to hang yourself. In some states, inmates deemed to be at “acute risk” are given continuous supervision—someone is watching them every minute of every day. This designation is typically reserved for those who seem both inclined to commit suicide and temporarily unable to control their actions. In a hospital setting, the most extreme situations may call for a “sitter” who will remain within arm’s reach of the patient for the duration of the watch.

If the suicide-watch system fails, a prison may be liable for civil damages. The institution must have a reasonable method for assessing risk and preventing self-injury. For example, relevant members of the prison staff should have sufficient training to deal with a suicide attempt. They should also make a concerted effort to keep dangerous objects out of the hands of the inmates.
This will not be the first or last time that somebody on suicide watch commits suicide.

So what was the first suicide attempt? A hit gone wrong?
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Old 08-10-2019, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Croatia and Worldwideweb
651 posts, read 202,058 times
Reputation: 406
Quote:
Originally Posted by somebodyfromnc View Post
He was supposedly on suicide watch. Something is fishy. I withhold my vote, for now...
yup
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Old 08-10-2019, 09:33 AM
 
9,232 posts, read 5,723,075 times
Reputation: 3931
The moment he was taken to prison, this outcome was guaranteed..... the list of powerful people connected to this guy and his sex slavery ring was too large. He was never EVER going to see a courtroom, because too many had too much to lose. Now, there will be no trial... no testimony... no witnesses naming names .... it will all go away.

How convenient.
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Old 08-10-2019, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Gulf Coast Texas
29,296 posts, read 15,924,298 times
Reputation: 11813
Wait... since there are multiple theories floating around...

Do we really know if he's dead? All we have is a report and him being wheeled out on a gurney. Maybe an escape attempt?

Just throwing it out there...
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Old 08-10-2019, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Central Illinois -
22,273 posts, read 14,740,373 times
Reputation: 15451
I believe someone created favorable conditions for him to kill himself.

Epstein’s wealth, private plane, and a Rolodex of powerful friends provided him cover during years where authorities say he preyed on underage girls. Trump and Epstein were neighbors in Palm Beach and partied together several times.”I’ve known Jeff for 15 years. Terrific guy,” Trump told New York magazine in 2002. “He’s a lot of fun to be with. It is even said that he likes beautiful women as much as I do, and many of them are on the younger side.”
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Old 08-10-2019, 09:36 AM
 
Location: between three Great Lakes.
1,854 posts, read 2,024,356 times
Reputation: 6406
Wasn't he super-heavily guarded?
Never mind; I now see the theories on this thread.
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Old 08-10-2019, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Pacific Beach/San Diego
3,852 posts, read 2,556,923 times
Reputation: 3790
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilot1 View Post
As do I, or Arkancide as some also put it. This was a purposeful hit. Only Lefty, Clinton apologists will think otherwise. All are scrambling to make excuses. Oh, by the way. Hillary lost. lol!
Why? Trump seemed to hang out with him as well.
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