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Old 08-11-2019, 07:19 AM
 
67,261 posts, read 30,883,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodnight View Post
The education system in many states is heavily segregated mainly because funding is based on real estate taxes. States compensate by providing more funding but it doesn't come close to making up the gap and funding isn't the only issue. Students from homes with two parent college educated parents that are wealthy will always out perform single parent with a high school diploma. Send any child to one of these poor districts and the outcome is very predictable in spite of a few success stories. The narrative that they need to pull themselves up regardless of the odds is tedious, send your child to a school district like Camden, NJ is lets see the outcome.


I don't see the demographic on this story but I would guess there are many young single parents in many of these districts yet we continue to fight against clinics that offer family planning and education.
There are over 13,500 FQHC federal taxpayer-subsidized women's comprehensive health care (including family planning services) clinics located throughout the US, and only 665 Planned Parenthood facilities. PP is both redundant and unnecessary.
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Old 08-11-2019, 07:22 AM
 
5,216 posts, read 2,672,620 times
Reputation: 6612
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncguy50 View Post
Spot on. But this kind of truth is ignored by leftists trying to blame poor performance on systemic racism.

It really comes down to one word: honor. Some cultures just don't value it.
Don't just focus on inner city areas with large minority population. Rural middle America ain't doing much better. I have a friend who's a teacher. He has taught in both rural and urban areas. He tells me that the kids from both have the same disruptive and disrespectful attitude toward teachers and elders.
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Old 08-11-2019, 07:30 AM
 
Location: Japan
11,072 posts, read 4,574,226 times
Reputation: 7079
Quote:
Originally Posted by MetroWord View Post
I don't agree with this. I've taken an iq test before. I don't remember exactly what I got. I just remember being slightly below average. Trust me, I am anything but triple digit IQ.

My oldest neice is now in med school. She took the ACT three times and never scored higher than mid to high 20s. That is actually considered low by any standard in higher education.

Look, I'm not saying IQ doesn't matter. I'm saying there is nothing special about my family genes. It is the culture of valuing education and respect for elders and teachers that have given our family much success in life.

And I really hate to point this out. But back in school it was always the black and Hispanic students that were disruptive and disrespectful to teachers. There is something in their subculture that make them act like that.
Sure, most jobs are doable with a below average IQ, but not those (engineer and mathematician). If you passed all the math necessary for a university engineering course there's no way in hell your IQ is sub-100.

Good luck to your niece in Med school. There's no super hard math involved in that so, assuming she really wants to become a doctor and dedicates herself to that, I'm sure she'll do fine.
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Old 08-11-2019, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Pacific Beach/San Diego
3,852 posts, read 2,537,614 times
Reputation: 3790
Quote:
Originally Posted by middle-aged mom View Post
A school’s performance is a reflection of student performance.

Schools with higher enrollment of Asian students tend to out perform other schools. Their performance compensates for the masses with mediocre performance.

Some cultures have historically placed a high value on education.
Read Ronald Takaki's "The Harmful Myth of Asian Superiority". There are plenty of Asian students who have medicore performances.

Schools in poor areas often have substandard teachers. Bad teachers and bad resources are going to lead to bad student performance. Even Republicans should be able to see this.
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Old 08-11-2019, 07:42 AM
 
5,216 posts, read 2,672,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Dark Enlightenment View Post
Sure, most jobs are doable with a below average IQ, but not those (engineer and mathematician). If you passed all the math necessary for a university engineering course there's no way in hell your IQ is sub-100.

Good luck to your niece in Med school. There's no super hard math involved in that so, assuming she really wants to become a doctor and dedicates herself to that, I'm sure she'll do fine.
Are you implying kids who underperform are destined to be disruptive and disrespectful to the teachers?
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Old 08-11-2019, 07:46 AM
 
Location: San Diego
36,003 posts, read 32,699,648 times
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We can try like San Diego did and that's bus the students into schools in better areas. Unfortunately, that just moved the bad grades into good hoods and the locals choice their kids into better hoods as the only other alternative is private school or home school. In summary it didn't fix anything. All it did was end up closing schools in areas the money should have been spent in to begin with.
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Old 08-11-2019, 07:56 AM
 
3,069 posts, read 3,088,032 times
Reputation: 3658
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodnight View Post
The education system in many states is heavily segregated mainly because funding is based on real estate taxes. States compensate by providing more funding but it doesn't come close to making up the gap and funding isn't the only issue. Students from homes with two parent college educated parents that are wealthy will always out perform single parent with a high school diploma. Send any child to one of these poor districts and the outcome is very predictable in spite of a few success stories. The narrative that they need to pull themselves up regardless of the odds is tedious, send your child to a school district like Camden, NJ is lets see the outcome.


I don't see the demographic on this story but I would guess there are many young single parents in many of these districts yet we continue to fight against clinics that offer family planning and education.
This is the key. While other industrialized nations have schools that serve poor children, they do not have poor schools, as they are funded equitably. In the U. S., we fund our schools based on the property values of the surrounding area. As a result, the schools that serve poor children are themselves poor.

I know this because I live it. I teach in a school in what used to be called a ghetto, where the home values range from almost nothing to around $35,000. Many properties are boarded up and produce no property tax at all. I've been there nearly three decades now, and things have gotten worse, not better. My students deserve a much better school experience than what they are receiving. They didn't pick their parents, nor where their parents chose to live. I choose to teach there because it is where I can make the greatest difference as a teacher.

As long as the United States links school funding to the property values of the school district, there will continue to be a great gulf between the funding and outcomes of wealthy districts, where property values send $10,000+ per home to the schools, and poor districts, which are dependent wholly upon state funding with little to no local supplement.

We aren't just okay with having poor kids--we're fine with having them go to poor schools too. As my dad taught me, you get what you pay for.
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Old 08-11-2019, 08:06 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
34,180 posts, read 42,758,751 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MetroWord View Post
Are you implying kids who underperform are destined to be disruptive and disrespectful to the teachers?
Destined? No. More likely? Yes. And it's a range of pathologies involved, not just underperformance academically.

But, then again, what do I (a 30+ year retired teacher in a school that, if you looked at just the financial and education demographics should have been one of the best in the state but wasn't even close), or the couple other teachers on this thread, know compared to the "experts" over there under that tree drinking a 40 from a paper bag?
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Old 08-11-2019, 08:30 AM
 
1,566 posts, read 347,283 times
Reputation: 1690
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1AngryTaxPayer View Post
We can try like San Diego did and that's bus the students into schools in better areas. Unfortunately, that just moved the bad grades into good hoods and the locals choice their kids into better hoods as the only other alternative is private school or home school. In summary it didn't fix anything. All it did was end up closing schools in areas the money should have been spent in to begin with.
Right. If you mix poor performers with good to great performers, the average appears to be an improvement but it really isn't. It's misleading by design in order to reduce the stigma when entire student populations can't meet minimum competency standards.
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Old 08-11-2019, 08:36 AM
 
5,216 posts, read 2,672,620 times
Reputation: 6612
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Destined? No. More likely? Yes. And it's a range of pathologies involved, not just underperformance academically.

But, then again, what do I (a 30+ year retired teacher in a school that, if you looked at just the financial and education demographics should have been one of the best in the state but wasn't even close), or the couple other teachers on this thread, know compared to the "experts" over there under that tree drinking a 40 from a paper bag?
I'm sorry, I'm just not convinced a person is limited by his genes.

How about this. I've told you I've always been below average and managed to become an engineer. Here is the next part. I've always been told by everyone in my family that we don't have what it takes to start or own a business. The thinking in my family is get good grades in school and work for somebody else the rest of our lives until we retire.

Earlier this year, my husband and I started a business. After everything is set in motion and we are earning good income from it, we quit our jobs to dedicate full time to our business.

The wrath from my family...
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