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Old 08-16-2019, 11:43 PM
 
5,239 posts, read 3,051,016 times
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These men were brave and they shouldn't have had to go through this.
With that being said, I have friends who were are are in the military. Millennials. Only reason why I bring that up is because I know it's gonna turn into a thread to **** on younger generations. But this isn't about them, it's about this man's story.

Just wanna know what you guys feel about his story.

If anything, I think the controversy is when he mentions kids dying that are too young to even drink.
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Old Yesterday, 12:27 AM
 
11,050 posts, read 2,861,945 times
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It does make you wonder what the reason for that is, why would they be totally fine with sending 18 yr olds to fight and die in wars, but then turn around and tell them they are not allowed to legally drink alcohol?!!


One also wonders why the alcohol companies do not step up to change this, they do have the leverage and influence to get it changed, and if their tv commercials are any indication, they seem to be very patriotic.


It does give me some comfort in knowing there are many retail stores out there, that WILL sell alcohol to soldiers who are under 21 ( I remember these from friends I had that were soldiers, basically if they showed their military ID, the retailer would sell them alcohol).
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Old Yesterday, 06:25 AM
 
37,725 posts, read 16,343,113 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rstevens62 View Post
It does make you wonder what the reason for that is, why would they be totally fine with sending 18 yr olds to fight and die in wars, but then turn around and tell them they are not allowed to legally drink alcohol?!!


One also wonders why the alcohol companies do not step up to change this, they do have the leverage and influence to get it changed, and if their tv commercials are any indication, they seem to be very patriotic.


It does give me some comfort in knowing there are many retail stores out there, that WILL sell alcohol to soldiers who are under 21 ( I remember these from friends I had that were soldiers, basically if they showed their military ID, the retailer would sell them alcohol).
"]It does make you wonder what the reason for that is, why would they be totally fine with sending 18 yr olds to fight and die in wars, but then turn around and tell them they are not allowed to legally drink alcohol?!!"

At 19 years old, my 1st night in Nam I was assigned to security detail to guard our battalion perimeter from 2AM to 4AM, I even had to borrow the M-16 from the guy I was replacing.

10 months later when I got home, I could NOT even buy a beer!
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Old Yesterday, 08:56 AM
 
Location: The South
5,341 posts, read 3,699,266 times
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I joined the Army at age 19 in 1957 and I had no trouble buying beer on post. It was a different beer than civilian beer, I remember it being called 3.2 beer. Alcohol percent I guess. But it was beer.
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Old Yesterday, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Texas
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Why are at war when no country has attached us since WW2?

THAT is the controversy.
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Old Yesterday, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Central Illinois -
21,829 posts, read 14,512,039 times
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Originally Posted by Loveshiscountry View Post
Why are at war when no country has attached us since WW2?

THAT is the controversy.
Totally agree. Why did those veterans from WWII, who saw some extreme carnage and violence, manage to, comparatively speaking, get on with their lives without suffering from PTSD like many of our warriors do today?

Because in WWII, they knew their cause, our cause, was just. The warrior of today is put into impossible situations like Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iraq, and then left to sort it all out if he or she make it home in one piece.
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Old Yesterday, 10:30 AM
 
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I remember vividly being taught in Grade 10 history by a gentleman that routinely displayed all sorts of weird behaviour and intolerance to any loud noises. Asked my father what the heck was wrong with him and he, a veteran of 4 full years overseas in three theaters during WWII, informed me the man had suffered "shell shock" from WWI trench bombardments at Ypres.

My own father was one who was injured twice and returned to action both times within a couple of weeks but who never once told his two sons of his experiences while overseas. We found out about his exploits as a senior Troop Sergeant tank commander (a real deal Brad Pitt) only after his death by reading his personal diaries, letters home to mom, and the two telegrams informing our mom he had been wounded in action and "more details would be forthcoming as soon as they became available" .... usually three weeks later, informing her he had already returned to his unit.

Because there were so many per-capita volunteers from Canada for both world wars that returned with all sorts of battle damage, everyone was exposed to some knowledge of their ailments and tended to simply let them be instead of making some big deal out of it. Those old boys basically had no choice but to get on with their lives as best they could because their own brethren soldiers were doing so without complaint and had little tolerance for those who tended to whine about their plight..

Those were the days long before baring your soul on Oprah was the way to get attention.

That's just the way it was then. Now, it's generally accepted that keeping those psychological wounds to yourself and not getting help is a bad thing …. but as opined by another poster, one wonders if we've perhaps overdone the attention and made too much of the "sympathy thing" without really addressing the actual treatment of the causes.
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Old Yesterday, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Sale Creek, TN
4,014 posts, read 3,668,058 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by odanny View Post
Totally agree. Why did those veterans from WWII, who saw some extreme carnage and violence, manage to, comparatively speaking, get on with their lives without suffering from PTSD like many of our warriors do today?

Because in WWII, they knew their cause, our cause, was just. The warrior of today is put into impossible situations like Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iraq, and then left to sort it all out if he or she make it home in one piece.
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Old Yesterday, 11:48 AM
 
10,044 posts, read 4,712,803 times
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Originally Posted by Southern man View Post
I joined the Army at age 19 in 1957 and I had no trouble buying beer on post. It was a different beer than civilian beer, I remember it being called 3.2 beer. Alcohol percent I guess. But it was beer.
All we could get at Ft Leonard Wood was "near beer". About 1.5% alcohol. I grew up drinking 3.2 beer. I lived 20 miles from Kansas and that was the only cold beer you could buy. 5% was only sold hot there.
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Old Yesterday, 11:51 AM
 
5,170 posts, read 2,277,952 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by odanny View Post
Totally agree. Why did those veterans from WWII, who saw some extreme carnage and violence, manage to, comparatively speaking, get on with their lives without suffering from PTSD like many of our warriors do today?

Because in WWII, they knew their cause, our cause, was just. The warrior of today is put into impossible situations like Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iraq, and then left to sort it all out if he or she make it home in one piece.
You actually think WW2 veterans did not suffer from PTSD?
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