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Old Yesterday, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Ohio
5,124 posts, read 1,854,764 times
Reputation: 4294

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathguy View Post
Human civilization has been through this before and we worked through it. There is a lot of sensationalism around the topic because it sells. Not saying everything will be great and no problems but it's not like we're talking about a giant asteroid etc.
It's not a giant asteroid - but it is a huge deal when through human action we cause a significant shift in the concentration of a greenhouse gas.

The recent rise in atmospheric CO2 is entirely caused by fossil fuel burning and deforestation - many independent observations show that the carbon content has increased dramatically since the Industrial Revolution in both the oceans and the land biosphere.

The changes that are coming due to increase in CO2 will be puny in comparison to a giant asteroid or to changes seen over a geologic time scale. But they will be enormously disrupting to human beings, who have little capacity to cope with even minor shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns.
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Old Yesterday, 10:51 AM
 
9,434 posts, read 2,885,184 times
Reputation: 5692
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathguy View Post
Human civilization has been through this before and we worked through it. There is a lot of sensationalism around the topic because it sells. Not saying everything will be great and no problems but it's not like we're talking about a giant asteroid etc.
One of the hottest periods on earth was during the Jurassic period, before humans. We have no idea the ramifications of how climate change is going to impact us as a species or any other species on earth. What we do know is animals and plants are dying at astonishing rates. We're all connected, and once the lowest of the lowest species at the bottom of the food chain is gone, we will be impacted and I believe are now being impacted. I know people like to think humans are the greatest and best thing this earth has ever seen and that we as a species are impenetrable. But we're animals in the end, and don't stand any better chance of survival than any other animal. Sure, there will be some survivors here and there. Just glad I won't be around to see it.

Climate change is already affecting countries around the world. It is one of the biggest reasons there is such a global refugee crisis.

We can scream economy and jobs all we want. But as climate change progresses and there are more and more massive water and food shortages, a fat lot of good the "economy and jobs" will do us.
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Old Yesterday, 10:54 AM
 
6,600 posts, read 2,836,879 times
Reputation: 7928
Quote:
Originally Posted by T-310 View Post
Itís summer.

Yes, it's normal that 2,000,000 salmon are killed by warm water in Alaska.
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Old Yesterday, 11:05 AM
 
3,070 posts, read 1,242,777 times
Reputation: 1984
Quote:
Originally Posted by TreeBeard View Post
Yes, it's normal that 2,000,000 salmon are killed by warm water in Alaska.
Speaking of facepalming. First of all it is not know if warm waters are the cause. Second it is not 2,000,000

Quote:
got this from a NPR article

CARROLL: There's 1.4 million salmon that came in this river, and we - you know, we might have seen thousands die off, but I'm not worried about the future of this species.
Quote:
There are multiple possible explanations for the salmon die-offs, but Jones says the main drivers are most likely higher water temperatures and a high concentration of fish. According to Jones, the Shaktoolik River weir counted about a million pinks through the river on Wednesday alone. That amount is almost double the number of pink salmon previously recorded for that date in the river.
Quote:
Jones says it’s natural to see salmon die-offs, and pink salmon populations crash eventually
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Old Yesterday, 11:07 AM
 
9,434 posts, read 2,885,184 times
Reputation: 5692
Yeah, nothing to see here. No climate change at all.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/08/19/weath...ntl/index.html

However, I think scientists are being too optimistic. I don't believe we have 200 years.
https://www.cnn.com/2019/08/18/healt...rnd/index.html
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Old Yesterday, 11:59 AM
 
3,998 posts, read 3,302,312 times
Reputation: 11623
I've posted on various threads on Climate change and regretted it, people seem to be up in arms on both sides of the issue to the extent that there is very little agreement between the opposing sides. That said, my own take on this revolves around the notion that anything we can do to ameliorate our tendencies toward polluting the environment, we should do, and we should try to expedite those restraint measures as soon as possible.

Political rhetoric has entered every aspect of our lives, but our air, water, and food, lie outside the realm of all that bickering, and they are all heavily impacted by pollution. Climate change that challenges our food supply is indeed a very big deal, and instead of seeing that some come here to laugh it up about the Salmon debacle, others seem to be incapable of grasping the information necessary to contribute a well thought out response, why is that remarkable?

For starters it simply demonstrates the reality of frictional politics as a huge deterrent to any meaningful conversation. And that serves those who have lots to lose in any attempt to curtail pollution, on any level. A divided country can't get much done, so, who's for pollution? Not many really, but change that to who's for jobs, who's for the automobile, who's for their electronic gadgetry, who likes to fly, and you get an entirely different response. So, equating pollution to all that sustains us, and---all of a sudden--pollution becomes just a slight annoyance compared to the all too often, negatively postured alternative.

I think most people would agree that we do need to curtail any and all forms of pollution that present as a harm to our food, air, and water, the how's of that would need to be consistent with what is do-able in the short term as well as what we will expect of ourselves in the future. As a side note: Political friction and endless debate among the ill informed masses will most surely slow the positive attempts to create a better/safer environment. We allow that science knows best in most all things of a technical nature, so, our concerns about pollution shouldn't be thought of as any thing other than a scientific challenge, and therefore best left to the best minds to contemplate.
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Old Yesterday, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Cumberland Co., TN
22,243 posts, read 21,910,419 times
Reputation: 21659
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eeyore1954 View Post
Speaking of facepalming. First of all it is not know if warm waters are the cause. Second it is not 2,000,000
Exactly. I think it is a combination of the increase populations and increase in water temps. In another article it stated locals saw this happen 4 or 5 years ago and there was a thermal block in the river in 2016.
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Old Yesterday, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Long Island, N.Y.
1,523 posts, read 361,452 times
Reputation: 1176
The pearl clutching in this thread is hilarious.
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Old Yesterday, 01:41 PM
 
3,217 posts, read 928,753 times
Reputation: 1928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicano3000X View Post
Let's hope so....from the same link

"Alaska's Bristol Bay, the largest sockeye salmon fishery in the world, is annually seeing boom times for salmon returns, and in 2016 celebrated the 2 billionth salmon caught in its waters, after more than a century of commercial fishing."
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Old Today, 03:13 AM
 
34,668 posts, read 41,853,334 times
Reputation: 30090
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilot1 View Post
Which would drastically reduce our standard of living and kill the economy. The climate changes naturally and drastically. What percentage is due to Man? What will the taxes, and restrictions do to reduce climate change? What if the natural climate change rises as it always does?
Going from fossil fuel power to Wind/solar/hydro will affect your standard of living? how so?
What % of current trends in Global Warming is due to man? well the use of 100 milion barrels of fossil fuel per day is having a major impact on our climate, As for increased taxes? yes there will be some taxes involved in cleaning up the mess we've made,in return we get a cleaner environment..
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instru...re_Anomaly.svg
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