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Old 08-29-2019, 02:04 PM
 
67,159 posts, read 30,776,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilot1 View Post
No. My family has had shore property since 1947. The water has actually receded over the years.
That's been my experience, as well. I've had land accretion, not land erosion.
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Old 08-29-2019, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Port Charlotte, FL - Pasadena, People's Republic of Maryland
3,003 posts, read 2,898,663 times
Reputation: 2490
I have two waterfront houses; one on the Chesapeake and one on Charlotte Harbor (FL). Not worried in the least. Unless, that is, I find the fountain of youth and will live for several centuries or longer. Then I'll worry....maybe.
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Old 08-29-2019, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Long Island
33,784 posts, read 14,233,141 times
Reputation: 7258
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenPineTree View Post
I live in Miami, and no. If it happens, it will be after I'm dead. I think it's just common sense if you want to buy real estate by the ocean you need to prepare yourself for the risk the coastline erodes and damages your property. Most people consider that risk to be worth the award of seeing the ocean everyday.
You must live well inland because they are definitely feeling the effects of sea level rise. I don't know how you prepare yourself for underwater property.



Looking back Miami was at one time a reef when it was this warm, hopefully you are old.
Quote:
IN Miami’s fashionable financial district, a slab of limestone juts out of the ground beneath the elevated tracks of the commuter rail line, across the street from a new apartment building. The pockmarked rocks sit about 25 feet above sea level. But 120,000 years ago, this limestone outcrop was part of a white sandy shoal beneath a sea that covered the lower third of Florida.


Back then, the sea was 20 to 30 feet higher than it is today. These high seas were fed by ice melt from Greenland and Antarctica in a world that was perhaps less than 1 degree Celsius warmer than our own, or 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit.
https://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/24/o...ter-miami.html

Last edited by Goodnight; 08-29-2019 at 06:59 PM..
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Old 08-29-2019, 06:56 PM
 
18,483 posts, read 11,331,103 times
Reputation: 9739
I absolutely think the seas are and will rise due to climate change. I think the first U.S. casualty will be the Gulf coast.
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Old 08-29-2019, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Victoria, BC.
31,059 posts, read 31,979,778 times
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I live in a coastal city, but am over 100 feet above sea level...No worries here, but my oldest son lives on the waterfront in Campbell River, and he's a bit concerned, as the ocean is already chewing away at his property.
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Old 08-29-2019, 07:12 PM
 
3,325 posts, read 960,107 times
Reputation: 2008
Gulf Coast and parts of the East Coast.......but the land is sinking faster than the sea is rising

...so even if there was no climate change sea level rise....they would sink anyway

http://www.ela-iet.com/HGS_Subsidenc...roceedings.pdf
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Old 08-29-2019, 07:17 PM
 
3,325 posts, read 960,107 times
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..the rate of sea level rise on Campbell River is 0.014 inch a year...and the ocean is chewing away at his property?
that's about 1 inch in 100 years.....

https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/sl...?stnid=822-071
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Old 08-29-2019, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Long Island
33,784 posts, read 14,233,141 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seacove View Post
I absolutely think the seas are and will rise due to climate change. I think the first U.S. casualty will be the Gulf coast.
The Norfolk area and Virginia have a problem but its really the entire east coast and the gulf. Its not just the coastal areas, many rivers are going to see changes from increased rainfall.
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Old 08-29-2019, 07:52 PM
 
3,325 posts, read 960,107 times
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60% of the sea level rise in Norfolk, Va and Virginia....is from the land sinking
..if sea level rise stopped tomorrow....it would still sink

https://www.vims.edu/GreyLit/VIMS/sramsoe425.pdf
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Old 08-29-2019, 08:03 PM
 
3,325 posts, read 960,107 times
Reputation: 2008
No changes have been measured in rainfall amounts in the past 200 years....global warming has not increased rainfall or flooding

https://ars.els-cdn.com/content/imag...008744-gr2.jpg
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