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Old 09-10-2019, 12:58 PM
 
556 posts, read 118,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winterfall8324 View Post
https://books.google.ca/books?id=y1W...page&q&f=false

In 1978 72% of Americans called the war fundamentally wrong and immoral.

As time went on the numbers consistently dropped and in 2000 only 35% thought it was wrong and immoral while even more (37%) thought it was honorable.

I know the media defends the war as a mistake rather than a war crime, and I know Americans don't care about means when the ends justify them (Vietnam today is a growing and healthy industrial economy). I also know in a lot of ways the Vietnam war was good for American geopolitical power as we have Vietnam as an ally now.

But why do less Americans see it as immoral, and so consistently less overtime? Do we know less about it, did we forget who Ho Chi Minh was, what the French war was about, what the Geneva conference agreed to?

Or is it that Americans have become more patriotic?
Reagan called it a noble cause. Pol Pot killed millions. It's understandable that communist regimes were feared. While the Vietnamese economy is doing well since reforms made in the 80s, their human rights record is very poor. They would be much better off if the US won that war.
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Old 09-10-2019, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Manchester NH
10,165 posts, read 2,850,445 times
Reputation: 2703
Quote:
Originally Posted by mascoma View Post
Reagan called it a noble cause. Pol Pot killed millions. It's understandable that communist regimes were feared. While the Vietnamese economy is doing well since reforms made in the 80s, their human rights record is very poor. They would be much better off if the US won that war.
Pol Pot came to power because of the Indochina wars.
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Old 09-10-2019, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Eureka CA
8,523 posts, read 11,316,067 times
Reputation: 12993
Your premise is flawed, way flawed.
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Old 09-10-2019, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Arizona
13,211 posts, read 7,921,466 times
Reputation: 7048
Why have Americans become more supportive of the Vietnam war?

Could be a form of the 'holocaust syndrome'.

It doesn't take long after a horrific event for people to start rewriting history to suit their agenda. The EUROS did it and are still doing it with their extermination of the Native American in the new world and portraying them as ignorant savages who's only function in life was killing.
The White nationalists of Europe willingly participated in the round up and extermination of over 6 million Jews and a total of 20 million ethnic minorities and there are many now who justify it or flat out deny that it ever existed.
History is always written and then distorted to suit the times.

I was a 4 tour combat vet in Vietnam.

the Vietnam war was flat wrong for America, driven by a bunch of hard right war hawks who wanted to establish and prove America's might and influence in the Eastern Pacific.
It was started on a false flag event in the Tonkin Gulf(Yes I was there and helped start it)
It ended in a rout for America and all it's allies who sided with us on the matter.
It was a waste of money, a waste of America's moral fiber and most of all it was a huge waste of America's son's and Daughter's lives.
Not just the ones who died or were physically wounded but all those millions who participated in the grand fraud and are permanently mentally damaged in the name of patriotism. Me included.

There are some things you do for your country that are so horrible and against the grain of humanity that you can never forget them and you try to live with the memories until the day you die.
Currently, 20 combat vets a day commit suicide. Living with the memories is harder that actually being there.

Anyone who says they killed, dropped bombs on villages or sprayed a group of black pajama farmers with their M60, from their Huey, and say's they feel no guilt is a psychopath and way off normal.
Normalcy is never forgetting the guilt. Only then is there possible redemption for all the things we did.

Last edited by mohawkx; 09-10-2019 at 02:34 PM..
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Old 09-10-2019, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Manchester NH
10,165 posts, read 2,850,445 times
Reputation: 2703
Quote:
Originally Posted by mohawkx View Post
Why have Americans become more supportive of the Vietnam war?

Could be a form of the 'holocaust syndrome'.

It doesn't take long after a horrific event for people to start rewriting history to suit their agenda. The EUROS did it and are still doing it with their extermination of the Native American in the new world and portraying them as ignorant savages who's only function in life was killing.
The White nationalists of Europe willingly participated in the round up and extermination of over 6 million Jews and a total of 20 million ethnic minorities and there are many now who justify it or flat out deny that it ever existed.
History is always written and then distorted to suit the times.

I was a 4 tour combat vet in Vietnam.

the Vietnam war was flat wrong for America, driven by a bunch of hard right war hawks who wanted to establish and prove America's might and influence in the Eastern Pacific.
It was started on a false flag event in the Tonkin Gulf(Yes I was there and helped start it)
It ended in a rout for America and all it's allies who sided with us on the matter.
It was a waste of money, a waste of America's moral fiber and most of all it was a huge waste of America's son's and Daughter's lives.
Not just the ones who died or were physically wounded but all those millions who participated in the grand fraud and are permanently mentally damaged in the name of patriotism. Me included.

There are some things you do for your country that are so horrible and against the grain of humanity that you can never forget them and you try to live with the memories until the day you die.
Currently, 20 combat vets a day commit suicide. Living with the memories is harder that actually being there.

Anyone who says they killed, dropped bombs on villages or sprayed a group of black pajama farmers with their M60 from their Huey and say's they feel no guilt is a psychopath and way off normal.
Normalcy is never forgetting the guilt. Only then is there possible redemption for all the things we did.
Thank you for your perspective.
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Old 09-10-2019, 02:51 PM
 
556 posts, read 118,086 times
Reputation: 554
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winterfall8324 View Post
Pol Pot came to power because of the Indochina wars.
Right. It's always the fault of the US. What is your reasoning? Mao killed 20–45 million people between 1958 and 1962.
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Old 09-10-2019, 03:44 PM
 
25,144 posts, read 12,328,267 times
Reputation: 10803
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winterfall8324 View Post
https://books.google.ca/books?id=y1W...page&q&f=false

In 1978 72% of Americans called the war fundamentally wrong and immoral.

As time went on the numbers consistently dropped and in 2000 only 35% thought it was wrong and immoral while even more (37%) thought it was honorable.

I know the media defends the war as a mistake rather than a war crime, and I know Americans don't care about means when the ends justify them (Vietnam today is a growing and healthy industrial economy). I also know in a lot of ways the Vietnam war was good for American geopolitical power as we have Vietnam as an ally now.

But why do less Americans see it as immoral, and so consistently less overtime? Do we know less about it, did we forget who Ho Chi Minh was, what the French war was about, what the Geneva conference agreed to?

Or is it that Americans have become more patriotic?
Because what liberals did to servicemen and women was despicable back then so amends are being made.
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Old 09-10-2019, 04:57 PM
 
5,255 posts, read 2,317,090 times
Reputation: 4180
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmagoo View Post
There`s no visual evidence of any kind that anyone was spit on or whatever. It`s a classic case of repeating the same lie over and over and it becomes a "fact". No police reports of breaking up a scuffle, no incidents on film, etc. Nothing!
Do you actually think a cop back then was going to report or arrest a soldier whipping on a hippy who called them pigs?

Sorry to burst your bubble. Vets were spit on. It happened to me.
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Old 09-10-2019, 05:00 PM
 
5,255 posts, read 2,317,090 times
Reputation: 4180
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmagoo View Post
Another reason it was a limited war was because what would victory look like? Japan and Germany were threats and they signed surrender documents. How could a non threatening nation surrender? What is it that we could insist they sign?
Maybe ask a South Korean?
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Old 09-10-2019, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Clyde Hill, WA
4,169 posts, read 742,945 times
Reputation: 1336
Quote:
Originally Posted by KenFresno View Post
The 1980's saw the rise of a very overt form of American ultra-nationalism and with it a societal trend toward glorification of the armed forces, specifically those in combat roles. This overall trend was further exacerbated by 911, the Iraq War and our nations collective response toward being attacked.

Can you imagine Hollywood studios releasing films now that depict American soldiers as amoral or in some cases as the villains like they did with films like The Deer Hunter (1978), Full Metal Jacket (1987) and Apocalypse Now (1979). Contrast the tone of those films with a movie like We Were Soldiers (2002) and look how different the depiction of the war was presented to the audience.
Hasbro had stopped making 'GI Joe' in the late 70s. They tried to substitute various action figures such as Indiana Jones, but none sold well. When Reagan came along, the culture transformed and they started making the GI Joe dolls once again.
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