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Old Yesterday, 01:16 PM
 
6,705 posts, read 3,700,561 times
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Schools are also stop teaching cursive. Well maybe in the future we are going to need cursive translators?
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Old Yesterday, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Florida
5,496 posts, read 3,164,719 times
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If you want to buy a digital watch, you have to hunt to find one. "High style" is analog, but very many young people have never owned a watch. They dig in their pocket for a phone when they want to know the time.
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Old Yesterday, 01:20 PM
 
27,812 posts, read 19,480,587 times
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any reasonably intelligent person should be capable of learning how to read an analog clock in less than 5 minutes.
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Old Yesterday, 01:25 PM
 
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I'm sure there will be some transition -- but like the lost of the abacus we will somehow manage.
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Old Yesterday, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Arizona
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I say, "so what?" Not many people wear wrist watches any more.
Times change. When's the last time you used your abacus? Or your slide rule?
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Old Yesterday, 01:27 PM
 
24,136 posts, read 12,669,238 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jo48 View Post
Schools are also stop teaching cursive. Well maybe in the future we are going to need cursive translators?
Nope they will scan it with their phones and it will translate.
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Old Yesterday, 01:30 PM
 
3,113 posts, read 1,257,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reed067 View Post
People have been using analog clocks for almost as long as they have been telling time. However, with the abundance of modern technology, the younger generations are finding it difficult to tell the time using the hands of the clock.

In the UK, the home of the world’s most famous clock, Big Ben, many educators are phasing out analog clocks in favor of digital ones. Students taking the GCSE and A-level exams were complaining that they couldn’t read the time. In order to make everything “as easy and straightforward as possible,” they are making the switch to digital time reading.

Stephanie Keenan works at Ruislip High School in northwest London and is the Head of English. Her school has installed digital clocks in the exam hall.

Teachers have started “removing analog clocks from examination halls because teenagers are unable to tell the time [1].” While many classrooms will still have analog clocks, during scholastic aptitude examinations digital clocks are favored. Students are under strict time constraints during these tests, and teachers believe that using digital clocks in favor of analog clocks help students.


https://evolve.shared.com/schools-ar...box=1567782909

Not sure how I feel about this there are going to be times in their life where they under a deadline, Coddling them now isn’t going to help them down the road.
If the old round clock is a thing of the past big deal. I have trouble reading a sundial or an hourglass.
Although I loved my Felix the Cat clock.
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Old Yesterday, 01:36 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
30,453 posts, read 55,421,310 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mohawkx View Post
I say, "so what?" Not many people wear wrist watches any more.
Times change. When's the last time you used your abacus? Or your slide rule?
I don't have an abacus despite my age, but I actually found my slide rule in a box when cleaning out some storage. Around here, in my family and at work almost everyone has a time-telling device on their wrist. Many are Apple watches, other various forms of Fitbit or other fitness tracking that also happe to show the time.
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Old Yesterday, 01:38 PM
 
6,018 posts, read 1,633,297 times
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Many young people also cannot read or write in cursive. We are sliding backward very quickly.
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Old Yesterday, 01:40 PM
 
1,193 posts, read 639,833 times
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Don't know anything about the u.k. but in the u.s. yes, many kids can't read an analog clock, can't count back change, can't write in cursive, can't tie shoelaces. Because they haven't been taught to. There's nothing wrong with them so please ease up on the derogatory comments about intelligence. How many of us can operate a slide rule? Or multiply three figures times three figures in our heads like they had to do in parts of the agricultural 19th century midwest, just to graduate 8th grade?
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