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Old 04-26-2009, 05:59 AM
 
943 posts, read 2,781,286 times
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Were some of the released prisoners held by America tortured? I am not talking about the leaders of 9/11 or the Taliban or terrorists who admitted they were guilty. But instead I am talking about prisoners in the CIA or Military Jails or people who were turned in for a bounty and were later determined innocent.

What do you think of America if they were given aggressive interrogation as a possible terror suspect but it is now suspected they were actually innocent? Should America pay them millions to make up for their pain?

I am interested in what Republications and Bush supporters feel?
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Old 04-26-2009, 02:50 PM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
4,883 posts, read 7,321,716 times
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I don't think they will honestly answer that question.
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Old 04-26-2009, 03:06 PM
 
Location: FL/TX Coasts
1,456 posts, read 3,764,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weekend Traveler View Post
Were some of the released prisoners held by America tortured? I am not talking about the leaders of 9/11 or the Taliban or terrorists who admitted they were guilty. But instead I am talking about prisoners in the CIA or Military Jails or people who were turned in for a bounty and were later determined innocent.

What do you think of America if they were given aggressive interrogation as a possible terror suspect but it is now suspected they were actually innocent? Should America pay them millions to make up for their pain?

I am interested in what Republications and Bush supporters feel?
they will call it self-defense...Native Americans know something about that
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Old 04-26-2009, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, NV
1,067 posts, read 2,639,660 times
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Even as a pretty conservative person, I fall in the more "liberal" rankings on this one. The Geneva Convention was established for a reason, and in light of the lessons learned that got most of our world on that collaborative conclusion, I think the reason for its establishment deserves a great deal of heeding. That we would do to others what we would not want done to ourselves is just despicable, no matter what others might have done to us. It's starting to look like that was the case lately. Some countries consider us a threat and have chosen in the past to do reprehensible things to American visitors, and I've always been glad that we live in an age where that stuff is held accountable as much as possible.

As an American, I hope that the world does not judge me for what my government establishments choose to implement. I was never one of the brainwashed minions who blasted our Social Contract into a lop-sided mess just out of a little fear and vindictiveness. I don't have power over anything politically, and I feel that those who share that boat with me best err toward liberty in what they reinforce and punish via democracy.

And to those who think terrorism is some horrible new atrocity: Look it up... terrorism is an age-old atrocity, and the fact is very unnerving that we let it accomplish one of its primary goals by bringing us down to its level. Force and intimidation should go nowhere in politics in the 21st Century. Only when that is understood and abided will any of us have hope for security.

As for the specific terrorism of Islamic extremists, they hate our liberties, and aside from the erradication of Israel (you have to face it if you're a liberal who sees room for negotiation with violent activists, they have a right to feel that Zionist injustice in the wake of WWII disenfranchised them, but they're in no mood to compromise at this point, and really follow a rather archaic means of getting political attention), nothing would make Islamic extremists happier than to watch America become an infamous police state in the eyes of a world that is understandably intimidated to see such a power player in the global market fall to knee-jerk reactionism and nationalistic empirialism, not to mention corporate corruption and Congressional petty malaise. At this point, one worries that the other power players are just biding their time until our corruption internationally and domestically leads our reputation and institutional functionality beyond repair.

That said, I can't wait to see what this thread yields. It won't be pretty, but it should be a great exchange of all sorts of perspectives... and a bit amusing in some cases, I'm betting.
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Old 04-26-2009, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Harrisonville
1,831 posts, read 2,116,368 times
Reputation: 398
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weekend Traveler View Post
Were some of the released prisoners held by America tortured? I am not talking about the leaders of 9/11 or the Taliban or terrorists who admitted they were guilty. But instead I am talking about prisoners in the CIA or Military Jails or people who were turned in for a bounty and were later determined innocent.

What do you think of America if they were given aggressive interrogation as a possible terror suspect but it is now suspected they were actually innocent? Should America pay them millions to make up for their pain?

I am interested in what Republications and Bush supporters feel?

I'm a Republican but not a Bush supporter at all. It is more than likely, it was in the testimony given to the Senate Armed Services Committee that many of the torture victims were not terrorists, combatants, or even Iraqi or Afghani. Some were people forced to give false testimony of the phony (at the time) Al Quaida-Iraq connection. That ultimately has cost the lives of 4,000 Americans. We'll learn a lot more when the joint bipartisan select committee is chosen and begins their inquiry. The issue is fast moving from the illegal to the treasonous.
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