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Old 06-06-2009, 06:39 PM
 
69,372 posts, read 55,346,365 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by odanny View Post
Because of travel limitations.
Those in the subburbs dont have travel limitations, not limited by public transit
Quote:
Originally Posted by odanny View Post
Have you ever ridden your bike to work before?
I havent riden a bike or a car to work in 6 years, or a bus, subway and not even a camel. I work out of my home..
Quote:
Originally Posted by odanny View Post
How many Americans can get from their home to their workplace on something that uses no oil?
You think we're almost out of oil? Please.
Quote:
Originally Posted by odanny View Post
You are a perfect example of what is called "sleepwalking towards the cliff".

Oh, and that does not factor in Mother Nature, either. Your head will explode if I even start discussing that
Your a prime example of someone who thinks the sky is falling because oil and gas costs money, as if those in the subburbs dont work in the subburbs.. Give it a break and start to think outside your narrow minded life about how others actually survive.
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Old 06-06-2009, 06:42 PM
 
69,372 posts, read 55,346,365 times
Reputation: 9358
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordBalfor View Post
Well, I think that there is SOME truth to what Odanny said. I think that rising energy costs will put more of a focus on higher density living. Certainly I've seen that trend here in the Seattle area (though clearly part of the reason for that has been the high cost of land) - and it IS true that in places like Phoenix the furthest out developments have generally been the hardest hit during the housing collapse - mostly because people are reluctant to buy too far away from their work.
Not at all true, we will see more people working from home, and a shift in demographics, those that work downtown will move downtown, those that down will move out of it due to costs. The doom and gloom of the subburbs have been predicted my whole life and its done nothing but expand.
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Old 06-06-2009, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Mississauga
1,575 posts, read 1,748,035 times
Reputation: 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by pghquest View Post
Those in the subburbs dont have travel limitations, not limited by public transit

.
What is it with this fascination with head banging? Be careful - it can cause a concussion.
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Old 06-06-2009, 06:51 PM
 
69,372 posts, read 55,346,365 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mississauga75 View Post
What is it with this fascination with head banging? Be careful - it can cause a concussion.
I read your response numerous times, cant find how it relates to the topic..

If you dont understand how those in the subburbs dont have limitations on travel, and those in the city do, then I think you're not qualified to discuss the topic.

For clarification, those in the city have to wait until public transportation picks them up, or they hire a taxi, either way, they are limited in their travel. Those in the subburbs get in their car and simply go. Nope, no limitations there..
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Old 06-06-2009, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Central Illinois -
21,364 posts, read 14,269,446 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pghquest View Post
You think we're almost out of oil? Please.
Consumption: Going way up.

Supply: Going down daily.

No matter what man invents, at no time will we ever be able to extract more oil to meet the increasing demand. Because we are past peak oil. Which means all the problems related to this imbalance will only get worse unless an alternative to oil is developed.

We aint even close. And, like climate change, cannot predict how exactly it will impact the greatest consumers of oil, the United States.

Also, I'll give you some advice: I wouldn't discuss others qualifications, especially when they are much greater than your own.


Last edited by odanny; 06-06-2009 at 07:36 PM..
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Old 06-06-2009, 06:56 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
19,868 posts, read 22,722,776 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pghquest View Post
I've been saying it for six months now, the market was over sold, so any short term recovery is simply a recovery of the market, not the economy..

http://www.city-data.com/forum/5641114-post168.html
Recovery for the economy is on it's way as well. It's isn't here yet, but the Recessionary period (ie that the economy is contracting) will likely be over in the next couple of months (by September).
The only question then will be how quickly and how strongly the economy recovers.

Ken
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Old 06-06-2009, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Mississauga
1,575 posts, read 1,748,035 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pghquest View Post
I read your response numerous times, cant find how it relates to the topic..

If you dont understand how those in the subburbs dont have limitations on travel, and those in the city do, then I think you're not qualified to discuss the topic.

For clarification, those in the city have to wait until public transportation picks them up, or they hire a taxi, either way, they are limited in their travel. Those in the subburbs get in their car and simply go. Nope, no limitations there..
Wow - it was called a joke - sorry for being light-hearted - sheeeeeeeeeeeeesh.....

it depends on the Public transportation system and where they work right. I mean if you live and work in a strong dt core - it might be more practical to take the subway a few stops to your destination.. It is cheaper and you don't need a car. Shopping is plentiful and cheap food - come to dt Toronto and i'll show you.
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Old 06-06-2009, 06:59 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
19,868 posts, read 22,722,776 times
Reputation: 7167
Quote:
Originally Posted by pghquest View Post
Not at all true, we will see more people working from home, and a shift in demographics, those that work downtown will move downtown, those that down will move out of it due to costs. The doom and gloom of the subburbs have been predicted my whole life and its done nothing but expand.
I'm not predicting doom and gloom for the suburbs.
I AM predicting a move towards higher-density housing (even in the suburbs) and a slowing of suburban sprawl.

Ken
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Old 06-06-2009, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Mississauga
1,575 posts, read 1,748,035 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LordBalfor View Post
I'm not predicting doom and gloom for the suburbs.
I AM predicting a move towards higher-density housing (even in the suburbs) and a slowing of suburban sprawl.

Ken
Actually in Toronto we are already building numerous high rise condominiums to deal with increasing population... we have pretty much sprawled as far as we can go so the only way to go now is up! Even Mississauga which is pretty much a suburb of Toronto is building a high density urban core and condo's galore becuase the last few townhouse complexes are being built in the city - thats all she wrote - mississauga has maxed out and the city will only be able to permit condo's..
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Old 06-06-2009, 07:23 PM
 
5,397 posts, read 6,873,186 times
Reputation: 4043
Question for the posters here more economically astute then me (and that probably is a lot):

Could the recent rise in stock prices be a TARP bubble? News still seems pretty bad, yet companies were getting praised and rewarded with a higher recommendation to buy for losing less money then predicted. Is that really a strong reason for a stock price to increase?

Will stock prices run up with no real resons why only to be yanked back down like during the dot com bust? I remember stock prices going nuts back then with no financial reason for it. None of those companies were making money and had huge P/E ratios.

I've stayed in the market with mutual funds and was considering selling some if DOW gets to 9,000 to try to take some profit. I don't know if we'll ever see 14,000 again. Any opinions?
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